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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1925 



METCALF PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO., Northampton 



Finance Committee 



Articles of the Warrant 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

HAMPSHIRE, SS. 

To A. R. Breor Constable of the Town of Hatfield, in 
the County of Hampshire; , GREETING. 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are directed hereby to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said Town, qualified to vote in elections and town af- 
fairs, to meet at the Town Hall in said Hatfield on 

MONDAY THE FIRST DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1926. 
at ten o'clock in the forenoon then and there to act on the 
following articles; 

(The polls will be open at ten A. M., and will remain 
open at least four hours, or for such longer time as the 
majority of voters present shall direct, but in no case shall 
they be kept after the hour of eight o'clock in the evening) 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year; Town Clerk. Three Selectmen. One As- 
sessor for three years. Town Treasurer. One member of 
the School Committee for three years. One Water Commis- 
sioner for three years. One Sinking Fund Commissioner 
for three years. Tax Collector. Auditor. Director of Hamp- 
shire Trustees for County Aid to Agriculture. Tree Warden. 
Elector under the Will of Oliver Smith. Trustee of Public 
Library for three years. Six Constables. All the foregoing 
to be voted for on one ballot. 

3 



Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to the payment 
of 13th note and interest, on the Center School, amount 
recommended $2,675.00 

Article 6. To take action in relation to maintenance, 
ordinary repairs on highways, bridges, sewers, and side- 
walks. 
The Finance Committee recommend $10,000.00 

Article 7. To take action in relation to the raising 
and appropriating money to pay bonds of town officers. 
The Finance Committee recommend $100.00 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money to defray expense of Memorial Hall for ensu- 
ing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend $200.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for Tree Warden and Gypsy and Brown Tailed 
Moth work. 
The Finance Committee recommend $500.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for inspection of animals and barns and 
stamping. 
The Finance Committee recommend $300.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for supplies and maintenance of Fire Depart- 
ment. 
The Finance Committee recommend $1,000.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appro-" 
priate money for Insurance. 
The Finance Committee recommend $1,250.00 



Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for contingencies. 
The Finance Committee recommend $1,200.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of the poor for the ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend $3,500.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for payment of interest. 
The Finance Committee recommend $3,500.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of salaries of town officers. 
The Finance Committee recommend . $3,300.00 

Article 17 To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the maintenance of the schools for ensu- 
ing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend $51,100.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the employment of one or more School 
Physicians. 
The Finance Committee recommend $100.00 

Article 19. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of cemeteries. 
The Finance Committee recommend $100.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for Memorial Day. 
The Finance Committee recommend $125.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the Public Library. 
The Finance Committee recommend $850.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of tuition, of Hatfield Stu- 
dents attending the Smith Industrial School. 
The Finance Committee recommend $500.00 



Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for 
County Aid to Agriculture per Chap. 273 of the Acts of 1918. 
The Finance Committee recommend $150.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for Street Lights. 
The Finance Committee recommend $4,500:00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for Police Protection for the ensuing year. 
The Finance Committee recommend $2,250.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the improvement of North Street 
from the end of the present stone road North. 
The Finance Committee recommend $2,000.00 



Total of the amounts recommended $89,200.00 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
WM. L. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



Article 27. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to bor- 
row money in anticipation of the revenue for the current 
financial year. 

Article 28. To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote "That the 
citizens of the town conduct their business on Standard 
Time for the year 1926." 

Article 30. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the taking up remains of old and putting 
in new sidewalk on Elm Street. 

Article 31. To see what action the town will take in 
extending King Street sewer to the residence of Joseph 
Gowash. 

Article 32. To see what action the town will take in 
procuring site for the proposed Soldier's Memorial Hall. 

And you are directed hereby to serve this Warrant by 
posting up attested copies thereof in five public places in 
said town, seven days at least before the time for holding 
said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due returns of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at the time 
and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this the twenty-second day of 
January in the year of our Lord, One Thousand nine hun- 
dred twenty-six. 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
ROBERT J. McGRATH, 2nd, 
DANIEL F. RILEY, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Selectmen's Report 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Dr. C. A, Byrne, $ 50.00 

Dr. A. J. Bonneville, 50.00 



Appropriation, $ 100.00 

STREET LIGHTS 



$ 100.00 



Amherst Gas Co., 




$4,396.00 


Appropriation, 


$4,500.00 




MAIN STREET SIDE WALK 




M. B. Ryan, Supt., 




$ 60.00 


J. T. Powers, Team, 




32.00 


John Wenzel, Labor, 




26.00 


T. Massonowski, Labor, 




36.00 


T. Novak, Labor, 




34.00 


C. Semkowski, Labor, 




36.00 


P. Zima, Labor, 




28.00 


H. L. Stoddard, Labor, 




42.00 


W. Kingsley, Labor, 




42.00 


E. Keller, Labor, 




24.00 


G. Howard, Labor, 




10.00 


Webster Box Co., Lumber, 




1.44 


E. Sehepp, Labor, 




2.00 


Est, Al. Strong, Gravel, 




10.20 


Geo. Newman, Guard duty, 




15.00 


North Hatfield Grain Co., 


Cement 


246.50 



$ 645.14 



APPROPRIATION & RECEIPTS 

Appropriation, $ 500.00 

Jo. Schepp, Extra Walk laid, 27.00 

Thos. Day, Extra Walk Laid, 48.60 

E. Day, Extra Walk Laid, 59.40 



BONDS, TOWN OFFICERS 






Boyle & McGlynn, Treas. Bond, 


$ 


50.00 


Tax Collector's Bond, 




44.00 




$ 


94.00 


Appropriation, $ 100.00 






CEMETERIES 






F. W. Bardwell, Treas. V. I., 


$ 


90.00 


J. Podlesney, Mowing Hill Cemetery, 




10.00 



$ 100.00 
Appropriation, $ 100.00 

COUNTY AID TO AGRICULTURE 

Warren M. King, Treas., $ 150.00 

Appropriation, $ 150.00 

MEMORIAL HALL 

Hebert Bros, Coal, $ 43.17 

North Hatfield Grain Co., Coal, 72.57 

V. H. Keller, Janitor, 75.00 

W. P. Boyle, Repairs, 3.60 

F. G. Howard, Supplies, 2.60 

$ 196.94 
Appropriation, $ 200.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 

F. W. Woodward, Band, $ 81.00 

F. G. Howard, Flags, 20.00 

S. W. Kingsley, Wreaths 12.00 

Northampton St. Ry. Co., School Tickets, 8.40 

$ 121.40 
Appropriation, $' 125.00 



INSURANCE 

Boyle & MeGlynn. $ 944.50 

Howard & Woodward. 684.88 



$1,629.38 
Appropration. $1,500.00 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS & BARNS 

F. T. Bardwell. Inspector. $ 300.00 

Appropriation. $ 300.00 

CONTINGENT 
P. R. Mullaney, Postage, $ 8.00 

Metcalf Printing Co., Prtg. Town Reports, 232.30 

Metcalf Printing Co., Supplies, 35.50 

M; H. Dwight, Office work & Postage. 67.54 

H. Pellam. Care Town Clock, 25.00 

H. Pellam. Janitor Town Hall and lawns, 33.50 

Director of Accounts, Approving Notes, 12.00 

H. S. Gere & Sons. Advertising, 60.82 

H. M. Stacey, Auto Tax List, 4.00 

A. E. Martell, Office Suplies, 20.38 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., Registering of Births, 6.25 

A. J. Bonneville. M. D.. Registering of Births, ' 13.25 

C. H. Chase. Deed Transfers, 19.60 

C. H. Chase, Reg. deed, 1.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Assessors 7 Supplies, 6.67 

Guarantee Brush Co.. 1 Brush, 2.00 

A. H. Beers. Surveying. 10.00 

"Wright & Potter. Tax Blanks, 5.00 

J. W. Heffernan. Supplies, 2.60 

W. & L. E. Ghirley, Sealers' Supplies, 17.93 

A. H. Bartlett. Office Supplies, . 2.60 

J. Podlesney. Mowing Hill Cemetery, 5.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel.. 10.74 

Northampton Commercial College, Supplies, 6.25 

Carters Ink Co.. Record Ink, 2.75 



10 



Stevens & Andre, Bill for Collecting Conn. Valley 

Tobacco Ass'n. 1923 Tax, 
R. J. McGrath, 2nd, Exp. acct. 
Foster & Farrar, Supplies, 
W. P. Boyle, Repairs on Memorial Hall, 
A. P. Graves, Forest Fire, 
F. T. Bardwell, Forest Fire, 



Appropriation, $1,500.00 



292.87 


9.00 


1.05 


34.51 


50.00 


17.10 



$1,015.21 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

A. R. Breor, Salary, $ 12.50 

A. R. Breor, Storage Fire Truck 1924, 15.00 

M. Fox, Labor at fires, 17.50 

C. Fox, Labor at fires, 1.50 

A. Belise, Labor at fires, 15.05 
Grin Graves, Labor at fires, 13.00 
R. J. McGrath, Labor at fires, 5.00 
John T. Ryan, Labor at fires, 10.00 
Sid Carl, Labor at fires, 5.00 
Alfred E. Breor, Labor at fires, 10.00 
Henry Labbee, Labor at fires, 7.00 
Jo Wesloski, Labor at fires, 12.00 

E. Vollinger, Labor at fires, 5.00 
M. Yarrows, Labor at fires, 3.00 
Allen Smith, Labor at fires, 13.00 

F. Guyetska, Labor at fires, 12.50 
Jo Smith, Labor at fires, 10.50 

B. Dulaski, Labor at fires, 5.00 
J. L. Day, Storage of Fire Wagon, 1924, 15.00 
J. J. Betsold, Storage of Fire Wagon, 1924, 15.00 

C. H. Crafts, Storage of Fire Wagon, 1924, Labor, 22.00 
H. W. Marsh, Storage of Fire Wagon, 1924, 15.00 
W. E. Boyle, Storage of Fire Wagon, 1924, 15.00 
John Marlow, Chief N. F. D., Assistance at Boyle Fire, 75.00 
S. M. Bourdon, Labor 2.00 



11 



A. Toezko, Labor, 


16.00 


J. L. McGrath, Labor, 


2.00 


C. W. Esloski, Labor, 


9.00 


B. Kiley ; Labor. 


4.00 


M. B. Ryan. Labor, 


15.00 


Jo Wilkes, Labor, 


4.00 


Tom Wicklas, Labor, 


9.00 


John Wickels, Labor, 


2.00 


J as, McGrath, Labor, 


2.00 


John Small, Labor, 


11.00 


John Wenzel, Labor, 


2.00 


H. Pellam, Labor, 


6.50 


W. Greenough, Labor, 


2.00 


AY. J. Shea, Labor, 


5.00 


Chas. Winter, Labor, 


3.00 


U. S. Rubber Co., Hose, 


63.28 


P. E. Balise, Korza Fire, Brush fire, 


35.00 


Hatfield Garage, Ford & Equipment for Fire Truck, 


273.30 


Hatfield Garage. Drying Hose, 


15.00 


Hatfield Garage, Supplies & Repair service, 


10.50 



$ 821.13 
Received from Paul Korzo, 

acct. forest fire, $ 35.00 

Appropriation, $800.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

A. R. Breor, Chief, Salary, $ 1,916.67 

A. R. Breor, Exp. Telephone, 44.70 

Hatfield Garage, Gas, repairs, tires, etc., 426.24 

J. B. Gocloski, Services, 9.00 

Geo. Newman, Services, 31.50 

R. J. McGrath, 2nd. Services, . 20.00 

S. M. Bourdon, Services, 5.00 

H. Pellam, Services, 9.00 

J. L. McGrath, Services, 9.00 

S. W. Kingsley, Services, 8.00 

12 



Prof. K. E. Wells, Analysis of liquor sample, 5.00 

Whitcombs, Cash Grocery, Gas & Oil, 

Herrick Foote, Badges (Constables), 

C. D. Reese, Badges, 

Foster-Farrar Co., Supplies, 

F. G. Howard, Supplies, 

Boyle & McGlynn, Insurance on car, 

Chilson's Auto Top Shop, Repairs, 

Chase Motor Co., Exchange of Cars, 

Chase Motor Co., Alcohol, 

Proulx & Fitzgerald, Repairs, 

H. H. Smith Mfg. Co., Stamp, 

Register of Motor Vehicles, Registration, 

$2,812.28 

APPROPRIATION & RECEIPTS 

Court Fines, $ 901.00 

Miscellaneous, 11.70 

Appropriation, 2,250.00 

$3,162.70 

INTEREST 

Commonwealth of Mass., Int. on Water Bonds $1,720.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Int. on notes, 2,329.92 

C. D. Parker Co., Inc., Int. on notes, 883.78 

M. J. Ryan, Treas., Int. on Water Bonds, 140.00 



10.61 


3.14 


6.16 


44.45 


19.27 


30.00 


27.22 


175.00 


1.00 


.60 


.72 


10.00 



$5,073.70 



APPROPRIATION & RECEIPTS 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Interest $ 524.20 

L. A. Deinlein, Treas., Water Board, 1,400.00 

Appropriation, 3,000.00 

$4,924.20 

MAPLE STREET SIDEWALK 

M. B. Ryan, Supt., $ 57.00 

J. T. Powers, Team, 60.00 

13 



J. Wenzel, Labor, 

H. Stoddard, Labor, 

W. Kingsley, Labor, 

T. Novak, Labor, 

T. Massenowski, Labor, 

T. Semkoski, Labor, 

P. Zinia, Labor, 

G. Howard, Labor, 

E. Keller, Labor, 

J. McGrath, Guard, 

G. Weicek, Oil, 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement, 



APPROPRIATION & INCOME 

Appropriation, $1,000.00 

J. Fortsch Extra walk laid, 13.00 

E. Kempesti, Extra walk laid, 6.00 

Geo. Weicek, Extra walk laid, 16.00 



42.00 


46.00 


56.00 


44.00 


44.00 


48.00 


44.00 


44.00 


44.00 


30.00 


.20 


487.05 



$1,046.25 



BRADSTREET STONE ROAD 


<P-L,\J<JU.\J\J 


M. B. Ryan, Supt., 


$ 264.00 


J. Wenzel, Labor, 


164.00 


W. Kingsley, Labor, 


156.00' 


T. Maskowski, Labor, 


156.00 


P. Zima, Labor, 


134.00 


C. Semkoski, Labor, 


156.00 


E. Keller, Labor, 


92.00 


T. Novak, Labor, 


136.00 


T. McGrath, Labor, 


110.00 


F. Johnson, Labor, 


96.00 


H. Stoddard, Labor, 


138.00 


Town Truck, 


320.00 


E. N. Dickinson, Gravel, 


143.80 


J. Small Trucking gravel, 


130.22 


H. W. Wolfram, Trucking gravel, 


216.22 



14 



W. Wolfram, Trucking gravel, 114.75 

M. Kugler, Trucking gravel, 114.75 

A. Beers, Trucking gravel, 51.00 

J. T. Powers, Team, 72.00 

J. King, Filing saws, 1.25 

Ben-Ford, Goal, 15.51 

J. Coffey.. Posts, 67.90 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Coal, 27.18 

Walsh Boiler Works, Repairs on boiler, 28.46 

J. A. Sullivan Co., Supplies, 8.35 

Hedge-Mathieas Co., Shovels, 14.00 

M. C. Bailey, Lumber, 183.15 

J. H. Pierce, Paint, 59.90 

Buffalo Springfield Roller Co., Repairs, 56.71 

American Tar Co., Tarvia, 1,015.31 
J. ,S. Lane & Son, Inc., Stone, • 2,019.85 



$6,262.31 



Appropriation, Town, $2,000.00 
Appropriation, County, 1,000.00 

Appropriation, State, 3,000.00 

Additional by State to complete, 132.37 



$6,132.37 

HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES & SIDEWALKS 

Barrett Co., Tarvia, $ 2,357.83 

J. S. Lane & Son, Inc., Stone, 333.77 

Gleason Bros., Trucking stone, 254.66 

E. N. Dickinson, Gravel 74.70 

E. R, Connelly, Cement Mixer, 225.00 

Hatfield Garage, Repairs, Gas, oil, supplies, 1,699.00 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement, 47.60 

B. &. M. R. R., Freight & Cinders, 110.68 
Jas. R. Coffey, Posts & Team, 163.56 
W. H. Riley & Co, Labor & Materials, 35.75 

C. A. Maynard, Shovels, 8.21 

15 w 



HATFIELD 



N. E. Road Cachinery Co., Repairs, 

J. H. Pierce, Paint, 

J. A. Sullivan, Supplies, 

W. L. Graves, Labor and materials, repairing 

water tanks, 
M. W. Boyle, Care, Prospect & Bridge St. com'n, 
Sid Carl, Team, 
A. Bokina, Posts, 
W. N. Potter Sons, Supplies, 
John King, Filing Saws, 
Paul Levitre, Team, 
Leviter Bros., Job work, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. E., Freight, 
F. G. Howard, Supplies, 
Foster-Farrar Co., Supplies, 
H. D. Smith, Hose, 
Webster Box Co., Lumber, 
F. S. Parson, Repair, 
Geo. Cruickshank, Repair, 
A. Klekot, Sand, 
Mrs. L. H. Kingsley, Sand, 
M. Brennan, Sand, 
Est. A. L. Strong, Sand, 

S. W. Kingsley, Rent of sand lot, Bridge St., 
Bisbee Bros.. Plank, , 
M. J. Ryan, Supplies. 

Northampton Ma eh. & Weld. Co., Job work, 
Chilson 'sAutop Shop, 
S. M. Bourdon, Gas, 
Whitcomb's Cash Gro., Gas & oil, 
Northampton Radiator Works, Job, 
Rubber Store, 
Reg. Motor Vehicles, Reg., 
Jo. Pelc, Gas, 

Howard 8z Woodward, Ins. on Snow Truck, 
A. Wickles, Care Main St. Common, 
E. A. Breor, Truck, 



Jfi 



9.05 


22.75 


34.79 


25.00 


8.00 


2.40 


3.40 


7.25 


40.00 


2.50 


36.54 


40.17 


5.96 


6.85 


19.63 


.45 


2.25 


10.50 


2.40 


6.70 


27.40 


5.00 


54.00 


62.64 


12.35 


.70 


1.80 


13.24 


4.75 


.72 


2.00 


1.25 


45.50 


40.00 


20.00 



M. B. Ryan, Supt., 

J. Wenzel, Labor, 

T. Novak, Labor, 

T. Massenowski, Labor, 

G. Howard, Labor, 

E. Keller, Labor, 

W. Kingsley, Labor, 

C. Semkoski, Labor, 

P. Zima, Labor, 

H. L. Stoddard, Labor, 

Tom McGrath, Labor, 

J. Vollinger, Labor, 

R. Belden, Labor, 

Geo. Englehardt, Labor, 

J. Jenski, Labor, 

R. Cutter, Labor, 

L. Casten, Labor, 

J. T. Powers, Team, 

P. J. Boyle, Team, 



1,073.00 


603.84 


310.00 


376.00 


94.00 


63.50 


200.00 


228.00 


248.00 


236.00 


24.00 


3.00 


2.00 


8.50 


6.00 


2.00 


39.00 


520.00 


228.00 



$10,229.10 



SNOW REMOVAL 

Following accounts includede in the above for snow re- 
moval and clearing side walks. 

P. Levitre, Team, $ 24.00 

Jas. Coffey, Team, 129.00 

Sid Carl, Team, 8.00 

Hatfield Garage. labor & Supplies, 768.41 

Howard & Woodward, Ins. on truck, 45.50 



$ 974.91 



APPROPRIATIONS & RECEIPTS 

Appropriation $11,000.00 

M. W. Boyle, Coal, 20.45 

P. W. Mullins, Coal, 12.16 

J. C. Ryan, Coal, 9.60 



17 



Est. Al. Strong, Coal, 6.62 

D. P. Sheehan, Coal, ■ 7.28 

Town of Whately, Truck, 22.00 

Water Dept, Labor, 46.00 

Adam Fischer, Repairs to fence, 10.00 

W. W. Gore, Cement work, 33.00 

Use of truck on Bradstreet Road, 320.00 

Use of truck on N. HatneldSchool, 95.00 



$11,582.11 

POOR ACCOUNT 

City of Holyoke, $ 1,034.14 

Mass. Hospital School, 222.85 

City of Northampton, 950.21 

Cooley-Dickenson Hospital, 190.50 
A. R. Breor, transportation patients to Tewksbury 

and to Boston, 108.52 

Wm. Micklack, Repairing, 2.75 

J. S. Bardwell, 36.20 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., 79.22 

M. J. Ryan, 50.44 

F. G. Howard, 295.65 

Shea & Fortsch, 172.33 

H. D. Smith, 8.45 

Department Aid & Relief, 17.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, 60.00 

W. H. Dickinson, 120.00 

Jas. Coffey, 11.75 

Kimball & Carey Co, 14.25 

Town Aid, 16.50 



3.390.76 



APPROPRIATION & RECEIPTS 

Appropriation $ 2,000.00 

State Dept. Aid & Relief 60.54 

Miscellaneous, 34.42 



18 



$ 2 ; 094.96 



NORTH HATFIELD SCHOOL REPAIR JOB 



Highway Dept., Excavating, cellar and cement work 

digging sewer and other jobs, $ 1,144.00 

A. H. Beers, Survey, 4.00 

L. A. Deinlein, Water connections and materials, 87.61 

M. Dulaski, Brick work, 314.50 

W. L. Graves, Labor and materials 223.51 

W. L. Boyle, Painting, 688.13 

J. K. Holt, Labor, 31.60 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement, 392.40 

W. H. Riley & Co., Labor & Materials, 46.80 

W. W. Wolfram, Gravel, 10.00 

Karl C. Putnam, Architect, 475.00 

Paul Holich, on acct. addition to school grounds, 100.00 

J. B. Kennedy, on a*ct. of contract, 2,000.00 

E. R, Connelly, on acct labor and materials, 1,000.00 



Appropriation, Feb. 2, 1925, 
Appropriation, Aug. 12, 1925, 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1925 
E. R. Connelly, Total ami of bill, 

Less amt. paid 

Balance due, 
J. B. Kennedy, Amt. of contract, 

Less amt. paid, 

Balance due, 
Paul Holich, Price of lot, 

Less amt. paid, 

Balance due, 



$ 6,517.55 

$ 6.000.00 • 
5,000.00 

$11,000.00 

$ 4,482.45 
$ 4,865.53 
1,000.00 

$ 3,865.53 



$ 3,547.50 
2,000.00 

$ 600.00 
100.00 



Balance of appropriations on hand Dec 31, 
Exceeded appropriations. 

19 



1,547.50 



500.00 

5,913.03 

4,482.45 

1,430.58 



ADDITION TO BRADSTREET SCHOOL LOT 
H. R. Belden, $ 700.00 

Appropriation, 700.00 

TOWN HALL 

Expense 
W. P. Boyle, Repairs, 
Amherst Gas Co., Lights, 
Geo. Newman, Police duty at dances, 
Jas. L. McGrath, Police duty at dances, 
Poster-Farrar Ca., Hardware, 
P. G. Howard, Supplies, 
Est Al. Strong, wood, 
Merrick Lumber Co., Lumber, 
W. L. Graves, repairs, 



$ 105.45 


23.92 


12.00 


16.00 


17.50 


7.62 


39.00 


3.56 


16.60 



$ 241.65 



RECEIPTS 

Received of Henry Pellam as follows : 

Dances, $ 110.50 

Basketball, - 14.00 

Tobacco Association. 7.50 

Polish Society, 'S.W 

Elks, 2.00 



$ 137.00 

OLD ACCOUNTS 

M. H. Dwight, Collecting bal, of 1923 taxes, $ 200.00 

E. L. Graves, Bal. due on 1919 Salary Tax Co., 100.00 

E. L. Graves, Bal. due on 1922 Salary Tax Col, 350.00 

E. L. Graves, Bal. due on 1923 Salary Tax Col., 100.00 

E. L. Graves, 37 days work assisting Mr. Kingsley, 185.00 

Elias Back & Son nlc. Refund 1923 Corp. Tax, 929.45 



$ 1,864.45 
No Appropriation. 

20 



LIBRARY 
Ellen A . Waite, Librarian Salary and extra work, $ 297.00 

Eleanor Howard, assistant 62.80 

Madeline Lang, Assistant, 6.00 

Albert Whitney Co., Books, 15.53 

Mrs. E. A. Cowan, Books, 5.00 

Sherwoods, Books, 292.88 

Library Book House, Books, 18.76 

Harlem Book Co., Books, 6.20 
A. R. Wormrath Inc., Books, s 6.61 

Library Bureau, Books, 10.60 

A. Whitman Co., Books, 15.44 

J. P. McLeod, Books, 2.40 

Carrie C. Cutter, Magazines, 62.75 

Gaylord Bros., Supplies 5.65 

W. P. Boyle, Repairs, 10.00 

Merrick Lumber Co., Lumber, 5.76 

Amherst Gas Co., Lights, 23.69 

W. L. Graves, Repairs, 2.00 

F. G. Howard, Supplies, 1.30 



$ 850.37 
Appropriation, 850.00 

SMITH'S AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition of Hatfield Students, $ 1,016.25 

Appropriation, $ 300.00 

State Refund y 2 1924 Tuition, 342.12 

$ 642.12 

SCHOOL HOUSE NOTES & INTEREST 

Note No. 25 paid, $ 2,405.00 

Interest, 360.00 



$ 2,765.00 
Appropriation, 2,765.00 



21 



SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS 

John McHugh, Elector, Salary 1924-25, $ 20.00 

E. W. Strong, 150.00 

J. R. McGrath, 2nd, 75.00 

R. G. Billings 75.00 

C. W. Wade^ Auditor, 10.00 
Marion C. Billings, Ballot Clerk, 13.00 
Margaret P. Ryan, Ballot Clerk, 5.00 
Mrs. Kate Mullaney, Ballot Clerk, 10.00 
Mary McGlynn, Ballot Clerk,' 3.00 
M. Crawford, Ballot Clerk, 5.00 
R. J. McGrath, Ballot Clerk, 5.00 
J. E. Godin, Ballot Clerk, 5.00 

D. J. Ryan, Ballot Clerk, 8.00 
R. J. McGrath, Assessor and taking census 366.75 
M. H. D wight, Apply on acct Assessor and census 150.00 
M. H. D wight, y 2 Salary, 1924 Tax Col., 175.00 
Jas. J. Fitzgerald, Sealer, 150.00 
V. H. Keller, Town Clerk, Treas., Dec. 24, 1925, 

Clerk B. S, 1,250.00 

V. H. Kellen, Assessor and census, 50.00 



Appropriation 




TREE WARDEN 


M. 


B. Ryan, 


J. 


Wenzel, 


T. 


Novak, 


T. 


Massenowisk, 


P. 


Zima, 


C. 


Semkoski, 


w 


. Kingsley, 


H. 


L. Stoddard, 


Lavitre Bros., 



& GYPSY MOTH 



$ 


2,525.75 


$ 3,300.00 


$ 


101.00 




70.00 




28.00 




24.00 




36.00 




20.00 




36.00 




22.00 




2.25 



$ 339.25 
22 



Appropriation, 


$ 750.00 




Jo. Zehelski, Taking down tree, 


12.50 


$ 762.50 


SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 




Retirement 


Net Salary 


R. W. Proctor, Principal 


$ 60.00 


$ 1,380.00 


F. M. Gifford, Principal, 


40.00 


920.00 


H. J. Talmadge, 


60.00 


1,540.00 


F. H. Hale, 


81.00 


1,539.00 


E. J. Burke, 




833.32 


Mae E. Toole, 


67.80 


1,288.20 


Mary E. Ryan, 


69.30 


1,316.70 


Louise F. Frisbee, 


60.80 


1,155.20 


C. J. Larkin, 


90.00 


1,710.00 


Mrs. Mary B. Powers, 




1,200.00 


Margaret A. Ryan, 




1,000.00 


Sarah V. Kilej*, 




1,000.00 


Mrs. Grace Bardwell, 




990.00 


Sarah V. Quinn, 


26.75 


508^25 


Rowena F. Damon, 


27.00 


513.00 


Mildred Boyle, 


, 30.00 


570.00 


Helen F. O'Leary, 


27.00 


513.00 


Mrs. Lena P. Fitzgerald, 




1,000.00 


Hilda Corman, 


47.00 


893.00 


Mary E. Boyle, 


50.00 


950.00 


Eleanor B. Whalen, 


49.00 


931.00. 


Mrse. Nina C. Palmer, 




597.50 


Margaret B. Schmitter, 


47.00 


893.00 


Rhena M. Mills, 


28.50 


541.50 


Mrs. Mary D. Donelson, 




1,000.00 


Catherine B. Brace (Mrs. Harris), 


55.00 


1,045.00 


Margaret M. Nolan, 


47.00 


893.00 


Fredonna Leicht, 


29.75 


565.25 


Maud E. Boyle 




870.00 


Bernice Bradley, 


85.00 


765.00 


Gertrude Phillips, 




900.00 



22 



0. A. Morton, Supt., 


100.00 


1,600.00 


Mrs. Constance Mullaney, 




400.00 


Mary E. Fenton, 


18.00 


342.00 


Margaret 'Donnell, 


18.00 


342.00 


Mrs, S, M. Bourdon, 




400.00 


Kathleen Connelly, 


18.00 


342.00 


Leonio Bertrand, 


18.00 


342.00 


H. L. Ford, 


)N CLASSES 


400.00 


AMERIiCANIZATK 




Mary E. Ryan, 




102.00 


Eleanor B. Whalen, 




85.00 



$34,175.92 

AUTOMOBILE CLASS 

J^s. J. Fitzgerald, . $ 72.75 

ATTENDING SUMMER SCHOOLS 

Eleanor B. Whalen, 60.00 

Fredonna Leich, 25.00 



SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS 

Marion C. Billings, $ 99.00 

.Margaret P. Ryan, 60.00 

Mrs. C. K. Graves, 17.50 

Mrs. E. L. Graves, 10.00 

Mrs. S. M. Bourdon, 60.00 

Mrs. C. B. Mullaney, 2.50 

Mrs. G. A. Deinlein, 2.50 

Laura Smith, 2.50 

Marjorie Boyle, 20.00 

Mrs. Marion Clark, 25.00 

$ 299.00 

24 



JANITORS 

Frank Brehm, $ 1,950.00 

Geo. Dick Kingsley, 360.00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, 265.00 

Mrs. J. K. Holt, 292.30 

Leonard Trecartin, 343.25 





$ 3210.55 


TRUANT OFFICER 






A. R. Breor, 


i 


300.00 


SALARIES OF COMMITTEE 






A. J. Smith, 


$ 


75.00 


P. W. Muffins, 




60.00 


H. W. Marsh, 




50.00 




$ 


185.00 


Mass. Teachers' Retirement Board, 


$ 


1,249.00 


FUEL 






H. D. Smith, Coal, 


$ 


397.65 


North Hatfield Grain Co., 




1,687.94 


Kimball & Cary, 




907.59 


Webster Box Co., 




648.60 


Wm. R. Cutter, Wood, 




26.00 


J. R. Coffey, 




40.50 



$ 3,708.27 

REPAIRS 

W. P. Boyle, Labor and Materials, $ 575.55 

W. L. Graves, 76.57 

No. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement, 80.85 

B. Bernstein, Labor and Material, 7.10 

W. H. Riley & Co., Labor and material, 79.45 

Slatington Salte Co., labor and materials 18.42 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, labor and materials 21.75 

Merrick Lumber Co., matreials, 211.18 

25 



J. A. Sullivan & Co., materials, 8.33 

A. Donnis, Lumber 11.49 

The Rubber Store, 5.40 



$ 1096.09 
EXPENSE 

D. J. Shea, Piano tuning etc., $ 10.50 
Amherst Gas Co., Light & Power, 218.42 
Poster Farrar Co., Supplies, 55.35 
Chas. Cook & Son, 10.00 
A. J. Smith, Freight, 11.01 
Consolidated Dry Goods Co., 42.03 
M. J. Ryan, 36.26 
Northampton Elee. Lgt Co., 2.40 
Guarantee Brush Co., 4.50 
O. A. Morton, Traveling Exp., 188.46 
O. A. Morton, Office Eep., 138.05 
O. A. Morton, Miscellaneous Exp., 49.64 
N. E. Tel & Tel. Co., 63.42 
Herrick Foot, Tags, 5.55 
M. Crawford, Filing Saws, 4.50 
P. B. Murphy, Conference, 2.00 
Maud E. Boyle, Conference, 10.00 

E. J. Gare & Son, Cleaning Clock, 2.00 
W. R. Proctor, Conference, 16.05 
H. J. Talmage, Conference, 4.50 
H. W. Marsh, 21.00 
K. Malinocki, Mowing School St. yard, 9.00 
O. E. Belden, Sons, Care Bradstreet yard, 15.00 
Gertrude Phillips, 4.42 
Texas Co. 18.35 
J. H. Pierce, 1.70 
Bernice Cutter, School census, 23.00 
Whiteomb's Cash Grocery, Transportation of pupils, . 280.00 
H. W. Wolfram, 15.00 
Howard & Woodward, Insurance on School Bus, 131.41 
Public Speaker Supply Co., Books and supplies, 9.10 

26 



Louise R. Frisbee, . 40.00 

R. W. Proctor, 10.45 

0. Piston & Co., 50.81 

Institute for Public Service- 14.00 

Silver Burdett & Co., 43.29 

E. E. Babb & Co., 690.35 
Lyons & Carnahan, 7.84 
D.. VanNorstand & Co., 4.89 
D. C. Heath Co, 77.18 
J. L. Hammett & Co., 782.13 
Ginn & Co., 449.65 
Mildred Boyle, . 45.00 
N. F. Whippen, 1.50 
American Library Soc, 9.00 

F. G. Howard, 148.04 
Shea & Fortseh, 1.79 
Bridgman & Lyman, 3.50 
Alyn & Bacon, 14.62 

C. C. Richards Co., 4.85 
Coburn & Graves, 2.10 
Henry Ditson Co., Tools, 44.57 
J. A. Sullivan & Co., Tools, 142.69 

D. A. Fraser, Books & Supplies, 60.00 
A. W. Gilbert, 9.00 
Houghton Mifflin Co., 32.97 
Harris & Gillpatrick, 94.53 
J. B. Lippincott, 23.19 
Mass. T. B. League, .60 
Chas. E. Merrill Co., 12.99 
Metcalf Printing Co., 152.50 
McGraw Hill Book Co., 2.13 
Macmillan Co., 83.26 
Northampton Commercial College, 44.62 
Newsom & Co., '28.19 
N. A. Palmer Oo. r 29.50 
Rano McNally Co, 289.65 
A. P. Schmidt Co, 1.87 

27 



University of 111., 

Chas. Scribners Sons, 

H. L. Sanborn, 

Clarence Hawks, 

Public School Publishing Co., 

Howard & Brown, 

O'Donnell, Quirk Paper Co., 

S. B. Call & Sons, 

M, S. Page & Co., 

L. E. Knott Co., 

State of Mass., 

G. H. Congdon, 

Penn. Publishing Co., 

Jas. Berry, 

Carrie C. Cutter, 

American Book Co., 

Beckley, Cardy Co., 

Boston Badge Co., 

F. E. Compton Co., 

Chemical Rubber Co., 

Central Supply Co.. 

Milton Bradley Co., 

T. Purseglove, 

Potter Press, 

Plymouth Press, 

University Pub. Co., 

Wright & Potter 

World Book Co., 

W. M. Young Regalia. Co., 

$50,068.37 
APPROPRIATIONS & RECEIPTS 

Town Appropriation, $39,500.00 

State Fund, . 6,600.00 

Vocational, 3,097.27 

Smith-Hughs Fund, 408.23 . 

28 



2.97 


35.72 


6.93 


9.60 


7.29 


28.92 


102.50 


26,00 


8.00 


40.36 


8.00 


3.48 


1.60 


4.75 


29.85 


18.29 


13.55 


9.36 


215.00 


2.05 


125.04 


56.70 


5.75 


1.10 


29.06 


13.30 


6.16 


13.68 


5.00 



Tuition, Northampton pupils, 


335.35 


Dog Tax, 


261.64 


Americanization, 


120.00 


Miscellaneous, 


3.80 




<fc50 31 6 9 9 




q? tJ \J . O JL U . — «y 


Balance unexpended, 


247.92 



RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

Bonds of Town Officers $ 94.00 

Cemeteries, 100.00 

County Aid to Agriculture, 150.00 

Contingent, 1,015.21 

Fire Department, 821.13 

Highways, Bridges, Sidewalks, 10,229.10 

Bradstreet Stone Road, 6,262.3] 

Inspection of Animals & Barns, 300.00 

Insurance, 1,629.38 

Interest, 5,073.70 

Library, 850.37 

Memorial Hall, . 196.94 

Memorial Day, 121.40 

Old Bills, 1,864.45 

Police Dept. 2,812.28 

Poor, 3,390.76 

Schools, 50,068.37 

North Hatfield School repair job, 6,517.55 

School House Note & Interest, 2,765.00 

Bradstreet School lot addition, 700.00 

Smith Agricultural School, Tuition, 1,016.25 

School Physicians, 100.00 

Street Lights, 4,396.00 

Maple Street Sidewalk, 1,046.25 

Main Street Sidewalk, 645.14 

Saleries of Town Officers, 2,525.75 

29 



Tree Warden & Gypsy Moth, 339.25 

Town Hall, 241.65 



$105,272.24 

Appropriations and receipts $109,473.36 

Balance of appropriations and receipts over 

expenditures, 4,201.12 



$109,473.36 
Respectfully submitted, 
EDSON W. STRONG, 
ROBERT J. MCGRATH, 2nd, 
DANIEL F. RILEY, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 

I have examined the books of the Selectmen and find 
them correct, January 9, 1926. 

CHARLES E. WARNER. 



Hti 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD, FOR 1926 

Clarence E. Belden 
Clifford L. Belden 
Frank J. Betsold 
Samuel F. Billings 
Michael Brennan 
Carlton H. Crafts 
John L. Day 
Adam Doppman 
L. A. Deinlein 
Joseph Dippolt 
R, J. Fitzgerald 
Joseph Goller 
Ercent Godin 
Frederick Jubenville 
James Mullins 
John McHugh 
Charles E. Morton 
Fred A Pease 
Chas. Pfiffer 
John T. Powers 
Daniel F. Riley 
Daniel P. Sheehan 
John G. StenGlein 
Michael Saydlowski 
Charles E. Warner 
R. J. Whalen 
Charles W. Wade 
George 0. Whit comb 
Henry Wolfram 
Francis Lovett 
Malcolm Crawford 
Charles Winters 



31 



Treasurer's Report 



V. K. KELLER, Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To balance in the Northampton National Bank, 

December 31, 1924, $ 16,072.03 

Less Peter Aloise check out dated Aug. 23, 1923 
(Bond), 

Net Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1925, 

Received from E. L. Graves, Col., 1921 Tax, 

Received from E. L. Graves, Col., 1922 Tax, 

Received from E. L. Graves, Col., 1923 Tax, 

Recived from M. H. Dwight, Col., 1923 Tax, 

Received fromM. H. Dwight Col., 1924 Poll Tax, 

Received from M. H. Dwight Col., 1924 Tax, 

Deceived from M. H. Dwight Co., 1925 Tax, 

Received from M. H. Dwight, Co., 1925 Poll Tax, 

L. A. Deinlein, Treas. Water Com'rs, 

License Fees 1 — Fruit and Junk, 

License Fees — Pool Room, 

License Fees — Slaughter, 

License Fees — Auctioneer John McHugh, 

License Fees — Bus, DeLux Trans. Co., 

License Fees — Permits for sale denatured alcohol, 

Rent Town Hall, received from Henry Pellam: 
Dances & Pictures, 
Basketball, 
Citizens Club, 
Polish Society, 
Elks, 
Tobacco Association, 



32 



1,000.00 


$15,072.03 


291.04 


1,580.92 


150.00 


13,976.77 


46.00 


26,317.88 


47,930.20 


1,150.00 


2,030.00 


112.00 


4.00 


1.00 


2.00 


16.00 


4.00 


$110.00 


14.00 


1.50 


1.50 


2.00 


7.50 



County Treasurer. Refund Dog Tax, 


251.64 


Bradstreet Road, 


1,000.00 


Fines, 


7.50 


Iroquios Publishing Co., Refund (School acet.), 


2.80 


Sale of Junk, 


1.00 


Highway Dept. : M. W. Boyle, Coal, 


20.45 


J. C. Ryan, coal 


9.60 


P. W. Mullins, coal, 


12.16 


D. P. Sheehan, coal, 


7.28 


Est. A. L. Strong, coal, 


6.62 


Town of WJiately, 


22.00 


L. A. Deinlein, Treas., 


46.00 


N. Hatfield School use of truck, 


95.00 


Bradstreet Road, 


320.00 


Adam Fischer, Repairing fence, 


10.00 


W. W. Gore, Cement work, 


33.00 


Police Dept. : Court Fines, 


901.00 


Junk fees, 


2.00 


State Treasurer. : Bradstreet Road, 


3,132.37 


Corporation Tax, 


14,972.76 


Income Tax, 


1,767.66 


Poor, 


60.54 


Civilian War Tax, 


63.00 


Bank Tax, 


433.58 


Smith Hughes fund, 


408.23 


Smith Agr'l. School, 


343.12 


Household Arts, 


1,511.12 


Vocational, 


1,585.66 


English Speaking Classes 


120.00 


Street Railway Tax, 


505.92 


Poor: Hospital bill, 


34.42 


Howard & Woodward, rebate on Town Hall Ins., 


23.31 


Est. J. Gendron, 


13.71 


Jo Zehelski, y 2 cost of taking down trees, 


12.50 


Paul Korza, Forest fire, 


35.00 


Interest, Northampton National Bank, 


524.20 


City of Northampton, Tuition, 


335.35 



33 



Main & Maple St. Walks— 

J. Fortseli, extra walk put in 13.00 

G. Weicek, 16.00 

E. Kempesti, 6.00 

F. Schepp, 27.00 
T. Day, 48.60 
E. Day, 59.40 

Sewer Entrance, John Bittner, . Two, Elm St., 66.00 

First Nat 'I Bank Transfer, 150.56 

Sealers Fees Collected, 41.10 

Temporary Loans: 

Notes Nos, 21 and 23, $10,000.00 each, Favor 
C. D. Parker Co., Due Dec. 1, 1925 
rate 3.64 20.000.00 

Notes Nos 26 and 27, $10,000.00 each, favor 
C. D. Parker Co., Due November 15, 1925 
rate 3.70, 20,000.00 

Note No. 28, favor Northampton National 
Bank, dated November 2, 1925 due May 2, 



1926, rate 4.25, 


20,000.00 




$197,881.39 


Or. 




By Selectmens order paid 


$105,272.24 


Bills payable, notes No. 21 and 23, 


20,000.00 


Notes No. 26 and 27, 


20,000.00 


Notes No. 19 and 20, 


30, 000.00 


County Tax, 


12,595.87 


State Tax, 


6,960.00 


Penalty, 


7.00 


Repairs on State Highways, 


480.39 


Soldiers exemption, 


9.67 


Leeds Sanatorium, 


13.71 


Sinking Fund, 


630.00 


Miscellaneous, 


6.77 


Cash on hand, 


1,905.74 


i 


$197,881.39 



34 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield, for the year ending December 31, 
1925, and find them correct. 

I find Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of One 
hundred five thousand, two hundred seventy two dollars and 
twenty four cents, ($105,272.24) with evidences of their pay- 
ment by him: also cancelled notes and receipts for State and 
County taxes paid and other items. Balance on hand 
$1,905.74. 

•CHARLES E. WARNER, 
January 19, 1926. Auditor. 



E. L. GRAVES in account with TOWN OF HATFIELD 

1921 TAXES < 
Dr. 



To cash received 
Abatements 



By uncollected taxes 
Addition to warrant 



$ 



Cr. 



291.04 
553.29 



634.33 
210.00 



$ 844.33 



844.33 



To cash received 
Abatements 



By uncollected taxes 
Interest collected 
Addition to warrant 



1922 TAXES 
Dr. 



Cr. 



$ 1,580.92 
387.93 



$ 1,707.11 

91.74 

170.00 



$ L968.85 



1,968.85 



35 



1923 POLL TAXES 
Dr. 

To cash received $ 150.00 

Abatements 80.00 

$ 230.00 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes $ 180.00 

Additions 50.00 

$ 230.00 

1923 PROPERTY TAX 

Dr. 

To uncollected $12,806.90 

To addition to warrant .34 

To interest collected 1,361.11 

$14,168.35 

Cr. 

By cash paid Treasurer $13,976.75 

By receipt found 25.00 

By abatements 166.60 

$14,168.35 

1924 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

To uncollected $ 38.00 

To addition to warrant 8.00 

$ 46.00 



Cr. 
By cash paid treasurer $ 46.00 



$ 46.00 



1924 PROPERTY TAX 

Dr. 

To uncollected $39,016.55 

To interest collected 739.23 



— : $39,755.78 

36 



Or. 
By abatements $ 37.97 

By cash paid treasurer 26,317.88 

By uncollected 13,399.93 

$39,755.78 

1925 POLL TAX 

Dr. 

To Assessors warrant $ 1,396.00 

$ 1,396.00 

Or: 
By cash paid Treasurer $ 1,150.00 

By uncollected 246.00 

— $ 1,396.00 

1925 PROPERTY TAX 

Dr. 

To Assessors warrant $95,780.44 

To addition ot warrant 77.86 

To interest collected 13.60 

$95,871.90 



Or. 
By cash paid treasurer $47,930.20 

By uncollected 47,941.70 

$95,871.90 

I have this day examined the books of the Tax Collector 
and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 
January 18, 1926. Auditor. 



37 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Dr. 

Notes outstanding. Renewal of Note No. .16 
Dated May 14, 1924 by Note No. 25, 
Dated May 14, 1925, 

Note No. 28, Due May 2, 1926, 
Balance due on North Hatfield School Job, 



Cr. 
By Uncollected Taxes, 1924, Property, 
By Uncollected 'Taxes 1925, Property, 
By Uncollected Taxes, 1925, Poll, 
Balance of Appropriations and Receipts over 

expenditures, 
Net Debt incurred for the year, 



$40,000.00 

20,000.00 

5,913.03 



$65,913.03 


$13,399.93 

47,941.70 

246.00 


4,201.12. 

124.28 



$65,913.03 



PERPETUAL CARE 


CEMETERY 


AND OTHER 


FUNDS 




Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund, 


1924 


1924 


1924 


Hannah W. Smith, 


$ 12.00 


$ 10.00 


$ 40.38 


Augusta Wells, 


15.88 


10.00 


355.64 


Oliver Warner, 


2.32 


2.00 


51.52 


John H. Sanderson, 


4.77 


4.00 


105.78 


Luman M. Moore, 


10.11 


8.00 


224.35 


P. M. Wells, 


5.79 


5.00 


128.13 


Benjamin Waite, 


3.47 


2.00 


78.12 


Abby Dickinson, 


4.37 


3.50 


97.08 


Silas G. Hubbard 






237.19 


Levi Graves 


3.94 


2.00 


151.94 


Lucy L. Morton, 


12.33 


4.00 


279.70 


Charles Smith, 


193 


4.00 


109.52 


Lemuel B. Field, 


4.91 


4.00 


108.97 


Charlotte G. Wilkie, 


51.42 




1,181.74 



38 



Rufus H. Gowles, 
Charles E. Hubbard, 
Alpheus Cowles, 
James Porter, 
Daniel W. Allis, 
J. H. Howard, 
Fannie M. Burke, 
Charles S. Shattuck, 
Seth W. Kingsley, 
E. S. Warner, 
Reuben Belden, 
Theodore Porter, 
Charles L. Graves, 
Roswell Hubbard, 
Cooley D. Dickinson, 
Elizah Bardwell, 
Joseph D. Billings, 
Memorial Town Hall, Int. 
Edward C. Billings, 
Augusta Beals, 



4.95 


4.00 


110,47 


5.15 


4.00 


115.08 


4.82 


4.00 


106.91 


4.56 


4.00 


104.00 


7.43 


5.00 


166.33 


4.68 


4.00 


103.75 


4.60 


4.00 


105.01 


4.60 


4.00 


104,86 


4.56 


4.00 


103,98 


9.39 


7.00 


208.92 


4.64 




109.77 


4.46 


4.00 


101.59 


4.46 


4.00 


101.63 


4.55 


4.00 


101.10 


5.81 


10.00 


126.48 


14.24 


4.00 


323.42 


4.55 


4.00 


100.70 


137.67Deposit 32.65 


3,549.19 


25.00 


20.00 


560.00 


4.49 


4.00 


102.37 



39 



REPORT OF THE SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 



Dec. 31, 1924 Amount of Fund $40,548.90 

Additions 903.32 



$41,452.22 
Paid Water Bonds, 1 to 30 30,000.00 



Balance on Hand, Dec. 31, 1925 $11,452.22 

Easthampton Savings Bank $ 1,310.37 

First National Bank, Savings Dept, 1,141.85 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Bonds 2,000.00 

Hatfield Water Bonds 7,000.00 



$11,452.22 



M. J. RYAN, 
ERCENT E. GODIN, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the vouchers and securities 
of the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 

Jan. 23, 1926. 



40 



Police Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31st 1925 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1925, 117 

Males, 108 

Females, 9 



117 

Offences for which arrests were made : 

Auto Violations, 23 

Drunkenness, 22 

Assault and Battery, 13 

Liquor Violations, 5 

Larceny, 4 

Junk Dealers, No License, 7 

Unnatural Act, 2 

Begetting, 2 

Labor Law Violations, 3 

Disturbing the Peace, 7 

Violating School Law, 2 

Forgery, 2 

Unlicensed dogs, 4 

Vagrancy, 4 

Idle Persons, 2 

Setting Fire in open, 1 

Destroying Property, 1 

Promoting Lottery, 3 

Receiving Stolen Goods, 1 

Returned to Vet. Hospital, 9 



117 



41 



Total Fines District Court, $2,053.00 

Of this amount 762.00 was for violation of automobile 
laws, $378.30 was appealed to Superior Court, leaving a bal- 
ance of $912.70 returned to the town. 

During the year we traded automobiles by paying $175.00. 
I believe that this is cheaper than trying to run a car over 
one year. This year's car mileage was 18,700 miles. 

Permit me to take this occasion to express my apprecia- 
tion of your own very real support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Police Officer. 



42 



Town Clerk^s Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 



BIRTHS 

BY 
MONTHS 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
April 




b b <l OD 


o 
O 


Nov. 
Dec. 

Total 


Male 
Female 


6 13 1 
3 12 1 


3 


4 2 

5 2 12 


8 


1 4 33 
2 19 


Total 


9 2 5 2 


3 


9 2 3 2 


8 


1 6 52 


BIRTHPLACE 


OF 


PARENTS 












Male 




Female 


United States 

Poland 

Canada 

Czecho-Slovakia 

Germany 






16 

31 

2 

2 




20 

26 

1 

4 

1 



51 52 

BIRTHS FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 
1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 

84 95 83 88 88 



MARRIAGES g-gSl^l^g'ltJS 8 I 
BY MONTHS ^Eu^^g^^^^O^Q h 



13 3125 233 23 



First marriage of both, 22 

Second of bride and first of groom, 1 

Oldest groom, 54 

Youngest groom, 19 

Oldest bride, 39 

Youngest bride, 17 



43 





BIRTH 


PLACE 








Groom 


Bride 


United States 




12 


18 


Poland 




- 7 


4 


Austria 




1 




Canada 




2 




Scotland 




1 


1 



53 53 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 

Anthony " Zuroff George C. Pfieffer 

■ Woloss Anna S. Lowell 

Charles Slnssars Abbie Carl 

Alec Kieziel Peter J. Deinlein 

Frank Molinoski Elizabeth Duga 

John Gendrin Roswell Hubbard 

Emily B. Smith Anna Nolan 

John Deinlein Joseph Kuchyt 

James F. Mullins Mary Burda 

Charles L. Warner Eda I. Charters 

Age of oldest person deceased (female) 95 



DOGS LICENSED 

145 Male dogs @ $2.00 each $290.00 

16 Female dogs @ $5.00 each 80.00 



$370.00 
Less fees 161 dogs @ 20c each 32.20 



$337.80 
Paid County Treasurer • $337.80 



44 



NOTICE 

All Dogs Must Be Licensed on or 
Before March 31st, 1926 

Extracts from Chapter 140, General Laws of Massa- 
chusetts Section 137. The owner or keeper of a dog which 
is three months old or over shall annually on or before 
March 31, cause it to be registered, numbered described and 
licensed 'for one year from the first day of April following. 

Sec. 138. The owner or keeper of a dog may at any 
time have it licensed until the first clay of April following, 
and a person who becomes the owner or keeper of a dog 
after April first which is not duly licensed, and the owner 
or keeper of a dog which becomes three months old after 
March 31 in any year shall, when it is three months old, 
cause it to be registered, numbered, described, licensed and 
collared as required by preceding section. 

Respectfully submitted, 

V. H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 



45 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal Estate $ 656,212.00 

Value of assessed Real Estate 2,160,860.00 



Total Value of assessed Estate $2,817,072.00 

Value of assessed buildings $1,196,890.00 

Value of assessed land, 963,970.00 



$2,160,860.00 

Number of polls assessed • 698 

Residents assessed on property 561 

Non-Residents assessed on property 70 

Number of persons assessed on property 896 

For poll tax only 265 

Rate of tax per $1,000.00 $34.00 

Number of horses assessed 364 

Number of cows assessed 285 

Number of neat cattle assessed 67 

Number of sheep 137 

Number of fowls 947 

Number of dwelling houses 458 

Acres of land 9,051 
State tax $ 6,960.00 

State Highway tax 480.39 

County tax 12,595.87 

Town tax 73,472.83 

Over layings 3,667.35 

Addition to warrant 51.31 

Estimated receipts, 

Bank and corporation tax 2 500.00 

Income tax 10,697.72 

All others 5,200.00 

46 



Value of property exempt from tax 

under Chap. 59 General Laws : 

Church property 53,700.00 

Town property 261,900.00 

k l Omitted Assessments" 77.86 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN K. McGRATH 
MYRON H. D WIGHT 
VER.NET H. KELLER 

Assessors of Hatfield 



47 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 30th An- 
nual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

"We have received the past year as follows : 
Balance on Deposit, First National Bank $ 5,623.03 

One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Deposit Northampton National Bank, 2,310.45 

Deposit First National Bank, Savings Dept., 1,079.53 

Deposit Northampton Institute of Savings, 1,155.66 

Deposit Amherst Savings Bank, 1,757.01 

Three Boston & Maine R. R. Bonds, 3,000.00 

Interest on Deposits and Bond. 511.24 

Cash from Collection of Water Rates, 5,850.68 



$22,317.60 



"We have paid the past year as follows: 
Town of Hatfield, $ 2,076.00 

Salaries of Water Commissioners, 100.00 
D. F. Riley, Cash paid for labor, No. Hatfield 

Water Main, 66.00 

C. W. Wade, labor, 12.00 

Kiley & Gleason. Repairing water main. 578.88 

Northampton Water Dept.. Pipe and supplies, 738.09 

M. C. Bailey & Co., Plank. 44.95 

Hebert Bros. Coal Co., Charcoal, 3.30 

W. H. Riley & Co.. Supplies. 129.00 

R. A. Slocombe, labor, 7.20 

W. L. Graves, labor and supplies, 40.50 

L. A. Deinlein. trucking, labor and repairs, 383.62 

Boston & Maine R. R. Co., freight. 1.33 

James R. Coffey, team and labor, 6.00 

George Newman, Police duty, 5:00 

Norwood Engineering Co.. 12 Service Baxes, 60.00 

M. B. Ryan, labor cleaning reservoire. 30.00 

• 48 



F. I. Webster Co., Londen Carrier, 

Amherst Gas Co.. Lights No. Hatfield Water Main 

E. W. Strong, collecting, work and cash paid, 

M. J. Ryan, Sinking Fund Com.. 3 Bonds, 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Printing, 

Joseph Sadoski. land, 

A. H. Beers, line and levels, 

J. W. Heffeman. blank books, 

R. L. Belden, use of sewer pump, 

Boyle & McGlynn, Treas. Bond, 

Herman Harris, Police duty July 4th. 

J. B. Golowski, Policed uty July 4th, 

Peter Gallant, Police duty July 4th, 

C. H. Crafts. Police dutv July 4th. 



Balance in Treasury : 
Cash on deposit, First National Bank. 
One Liberty Bond, 
Deposit Amherst Savings Bank, 
Deposit Northampton National Bank, 
Deposit First National Band. Savings Dept.. 
Deposit Northampton Institute of Savings. 
Three Boston & Maine R. R. Bonds. 



82.35 


i, 45.38 


616.53 


3,000.00 


1.70 


100.00 


3.00 


5.50 


6.00 


12.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


$ 8,174.33 


$ 3,572.44 


1,000.00 


1,836.95 


2.402.31 


1.123.31 


1.208.22 


3.000.00 



$ 14.143.27 



Respectfully submitted 
J. W. KILEY. 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS. 
L. A. LEINLEIN 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Water Commissioners of the Town of Hatfield and I find 
them correct with orders on file for all payments made and 
s balance in the treasury of $14,143.27. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 
January 19. 1926 Auditor. 



49 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library : 

During- the year 1925 we have added 479 books to the 
library, 465 by puehase, 14 presented. Of these 285 were for 
the adult department. 

The circulation of books and magazines has been 6820 
in the adult department, 6277 in the juvenile, making a 
total circulation of 13,097. 

The Library offered prizes to the boys and girls of the 
5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grades in the center school for the best 
review of some book selected from the A. L. A. list, 

These prizes, consisting of books, were won by : 



Peter Rogolewski 


8th grade 


Jack McLeod 


7th grade 


Jessie Tobacco 


7th grade 


Margaret Stoddard 


6th grade 


Doris Smith 


6th grade 


Robert Ryan 


6th grade 


Edward Kroliski 


6th grade 


Michael Janos 


5th grade 


Stanley Nartowicz 


5th grade 


Sophie Kraulisz 


5th grade 


FINANCIAL STATEMENT 




Balance from lines of 1924 $ .71 




Fines,. 1925 12.80 






$ 13.51 


Supplies $ 2.85 


Postage and express 5.67 




Balance on hand .49 






$ 13.51 


ELLEN A. WAITE 


Librarian 



50 



BOOKS ENTERED DURING 1925 



Fiction 



Aldrich, Bess Streeter 
Aldrich, Bess Streeter 
Atherton, Gertrude 
Bacheller, Irving 
Bacheller, Irving 
Bailey, Temple 
Bailey, Temple 
Bailey, Temple 
Bailey, Temple 
Barclay, Florence, 
Barclay, Flornece 
Barrington, E. 
Beach, Rex 
Beach, Rex 
Benefield, Barry 
Bindloss, Harold 
Bindloss, Harold, 
Bindloss, Harold 
Binns, Ottwell 
Bojer, Johan 
Bower, B. M. 
Bower, B. M. 
Bower, B. M. 
Bower, B. M. 
Brand, Max 
Brand, Max 
Brown, Alice, 
Browne, K. R. G. 
Buchan, John 
Burt Katharine 
Byrne, Donn 
Cable. George W. 
Christie, Agatha 
Churchill, Winston 



Mother Mason 

The Rim of the Prarie 

The Crystal Cup 

Darrell of the Blessed Isles 

The Turning of Griggsby 

The Gay Cockade 

Mistress Anne 

The Tin Soldier 

The Trumpeter Swan 

. The Upas Tree 

The Upas Tree 

Glorious Apollo 

Big Brother 

The Crimson Gardenia 

The Chicken-wagon Family 

Cross Trails 

Prairie Gold 

Thurston of Orchard Valley 

The Lady of The North Star 

The Emigrant 

Bellehelen Mine 

Cabin Fever 

Lure of Dim Trails 

The Voice of Johnny Water 

Dan Barry's Daughter 

The Seventh Man 

The Mysteries of Ann 

The Cheerful Fraud 

John McNab 

Quest 

O'Malley of Shanganagh 

Old Creole Days 

The Secret Adversary 

The Crisis 



51 



Churchill, Winston 
Churchill, Winston 
Connor, Ralph 
Connor, Ralph 
Conrad, Joseph 
Cooper, Courtney 
Cullum, Ridgwell 
Cullum, Ridgwell 
Cullum, Ridgwell 
Cullum, Ridgwell 
Curtiss. Philip 
Curwood, James 0. 
Curwood, James 0. 
Curwood, James 0. 
Curwood, James 0. 
Davis, Elmer 
Dawson, Coningsby 
Dawson, Coningsby 
Day, Holman 
Delaneld, E. M. 
Dell, Ethel M. 
Dell, Ethel M. 
Eggleston, George Cary 
Evarts, Hal G. . 
Farnoll, Jeffery 
Ferber, Edna 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Fletcher, J. S. 
Forman, Henry J. 
Fox, John Jr. 
Furman, Lucy 
Galsworthy, John 
Garland, Hamlin 
Garrett, William 
Gibbs, A. Hamilton 
Gibbs, George 



The Crossing 

Richard Carvel 

The Foreigner 

The Man from Glengarry 

Youth 

The White Desert 

Luck of the Kid 

The One Way Trai] 

' The Saint of the Speedway 

Watchers of the Plains 

The Gay Conspirators 

The Ancient Highway 

The Flaming Forest 

The Hunted Woman 

The Valley of Silent Men 

The Keys of the City 

Old Youth 

The Vanishing Point 

Clothes Make the Pirate 

Mrs. Harter 

Tetherstones 

Top of the World 

The Warrens of Virginia 

The Cross Pull 

The Loring Mystery 

Cheerful by Request 

The Copper Box 

The Markenmore Mystery 

The Mystery at Lynne Court 

The Pony Express 

Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come 

The Glass Window 

The Forsyte Saga 

Cavanagh, Forest Ranger 

Dr. Ricardo 

Soundings 

The House of Mohun 



52 



Gibbs, Sir Philip 

Green, Anna Katherine 
Gregory, Jackson 
Gregory, Jackson 
Gregory, Jackson 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Grey, Zane 
Hallet, Richard M. 
Hawthorne, Hildegarde 
Hendryx, James B. 
Henry, 0. 
Henry, O. 
Henry, 0. 
Henry, 0. 
Henry, 0. 
Hichens, Robert 
Holmes, Thomas K. 
Horton, Robert J. 
Hueston, Ethel 
Hueston, Ethel 
Hugo, Victor 
Hough, Emerson 
Hutchinson, A. S. M. 
Irwin, Will 
Kaye, Smith Sheila 
Keith, Marion 
Kelland, Clarence B. 
Kennedy, Margary 
Kilbourne, Fannie 
Kilbourne, Fannie 
King, Basil 
King, Basil 
King, Basil 



The Reckless Lady 

The Leavenworth Case 

Judith of Blue Lake Ranch 

Maid of the Mountain 

The Short Cut 

The Border Legion 

The Heritage of the Desert 

The Lone Star Ranger 

The Man of the Forest 

To the Last Man 

Wanderer of the Wasteland 

The Canyon of Fools 

Makeshift Farm 

The Texan 

Hoart of the West 

Postscripts 

Rolling Stones 

Sixes and Sevens 

The Voice of the City 

After the Verdict 

The Heart of Canyon Pass 

Rider 0' the Stars 

Merry 

Prudence 's Sisters 

The Hunchback of Notre Dame 

The Purchase Price 

One Increasing Purpose 

Youth Rides West 

The George and the Crown 

A Gentleman Adventurer 

Contraband 

The Constant Nymph. 

The Education of Sally May 

Mrs. William Horton Speaking 

The Dust Flowei 

The High Forfeit 

Let No Man Put Asunder 



53 



Knight, Gladys 
Lea, Fannie Heaslip 
Lincoln, Joseph C. 
Lewis, Sinclair 
Lockhart, Caroline 
Lowndes, Mrs, Bellor 
Lowndes, Mrs. Bellor 
Lucas, E. U. 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz ; Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill 
Lynde, Francis 
McCarter, Margaret 
Maeaulay, Rose 
McCutcheon, George Barr 
McCutcheon, George Barr 
McCutcheon, George Barr 
MacGowan, Alice 
Mackenzie, Compton 
Marquand, J. P. 
Marshall, Edison 
Marshall, Edison 
Marshall Edison 
Martin, Helen R. 
Masefield, John 
Maxwell, W. B. 
Miller, Alice Duer 
Miln, Louise J. 
.Montgomery, L. M. 
Morris Gouverneur 
Mulford, Clarence 
Mulford, Clarence 
Nathan, Robert 
Norris, Kathleen 



Marriage for Two 

The Dreammaker Man 

<^ueer Judson 

Arrowsmith 

The Dude Wrangler 

The End of the Honeymoon 

The Chine in the Armor 

Advisory Ben 

Ariel Custer 

The Best Man 

Cloudy Jewel 

The Enchanted Barn 

The Girl from Montana 

Not Under the Law 

Mellowing Money 

Vanguard of the Plains 

Orphan Island 

East of the Setting Sun 

Oliver October 

Romeo in Moon Village 

Girl of the Plain Country 

Seven Ages of Woman 

The Unspeakable Gentleman 

Land of Forgotten, Men 

Reward's Folly 

Sleeper of the Moonlit Ranges 

The Snob 

Sard Harker 

Spinster of this Parish 

The Reluctant Duchess 

Mr. Wu 

Kilmeny of the Orchard 

The Penalty 

Black Buttes 

The Orphan 

Jonah 

Little -Ships 



54 



ember, Marie 
'Higgins, Harvey 
Oppenheim, E. Phillips 
Ostenso, Martha 
Oyer, Henry 
Oynen, Henry 
Packard, Frank 
Paine, Ralph D. 
Parrish, Anne 
Payne, Elizabeth 
Pedler, Margaret 
Pedler, Margaret 
Phillips, David Graham 
Phillpotts, Eden 
Pidgin, Charles F. 
Pinkerton, Robert 
Pollock, Channing 
Poole, Ernest 
Porter, Eleanor 
Porter, Eleanor 
Porter, Eleanor 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Porter, Gene Stratton 
Prichard, K. and H. 
Pryce Richard 
Quick, Herbert 
Raine, William M. 
Rath, E. J. 
Rath, E. J. 
Rath, E. J. 
Reeve, Arthur 
Reeve, Arthur 
Reynolds, Mrs. Baillie 
Reynolds, Katharine 
Rhodes, Eugene M. 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts 



His Wife in Law 

Julie Cane 

The Inevitable Millionaires 

Wild Geese 

The Snow Burner 

Tarrant of Tin Spout 

Broken Waters 

In Zanzibar 

The Perennial Bachelor 

All the Way by Water 

Red Ashes 

The Vision of Desire 

The Price She Paid 

A Voice from the Dark 

Quincy Acams Sawyer 

The Test of Donald Norton 

The Fool 

The Hunter's Moon 

Miss Billy 

Miss Billy's Decision 

Miss Billy Married 

Her Father's Daughter 

Laddie 

, The Keeper of the Bees 

Don Q 's Love Story 

Romance and Jane Weston 

The Invisible Woman 

Brand Blotters 

The Brains of the Family 

The Dark Chapter 

Good References 

The Ear in the Wall 

The Romance of Elaine 

The Spell of Sarnia 

Willow Creek 

Bransford of Rainbow Range 

Bab, A Sub. Deb 



55 



Rinehart, Mary Roberts 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts 
Richmond, Grace 
Roberts, Cecil 
Roe, Virgie E. 
Rowland, Henry C. 
Ruck, Berta 
Ruck, Berta 
Sabatini, Rafael 
Sabin, Edwin L. 
Scott, Leroy 
Seltzer, Charles 
Seltzer, Charles 
Seltzer, Charles 
Sinclair, Bertrand 
Smith, Harriet L. 
Springer, Norman 
Stern, G. B. 
Stevenson, Burton E. 
Stevenson, Robert Louis 
Stevenson, Robert Louis 
Stockton, Frank 

The Casting away 
Stringer, Arthur 
Stringer, Arthur 
Tarkington, Booth 
Tarkington, Booth 
Tarkington, Booth 
Tarkington, Booth 
Taylor, Katherine 
Terhune, A. P. 
Terhune, A. P. 
Thompson, Maurice 
Train. Arthur 
Travers, Ben 



The Circular Staircase 

K 

The Red Lamp 

The Window at the White Cat 

Red of the Redneldy 

Scissors 

Nameless River 

The Return of Prank Clamart 

The Arrant Rover 

Sweethearts Unmet 

The Carolinian 

The White Indian 

The Heart of Katy O'Doone 

The Boss of Lazy Y 

.Square Deal Anderson 

The Way of the Buffalo 

Burned Bridges 

Pollyanna's Jewels 

Fire Mountain 

Thunderstorm 

A Soldier of Virginia 

The Black Arrow 

Kidnapped 

of Mrs. Leeks and Mrs. Aleshine 
The Diamond Thieves 
The Silver Poppy 
The Gentleman from Indiana 
Monsieur Beaucaire 
Penrod 
Seventeen 
Natalie Page 
The Amateur Inn 
The Runaway Bag- 
Alice of Old Vincennes 
Tut, tut, Mr. Tutt 
Mischief 



56 



Vernier, Norman 
Wallace, Dillon 
Wells, Carolyn 
Wentworth, Patricia 
Wentworth, Patricia 
Weston, George 
Wharton, Edith 
Wield emer, Margaret 
Williams, Sidney 
AVilliams, Valentine 
Williams, Valentine 
Williams, Valentine 
Willsie, Honore 
Willsie, Honore 
Willsie, Honore 
Wister. Owen 
Wodehouse, P. G. 
Wodehouse, P. G. 
Woodrow, Mrs. Wilson 
Woodward, W. E. 
Wright, Harold Bell 



The Imperfect Importer 

Testing of Jim McLean 

Wheels within Wheels 

The Ann am Jewel 

The Red Laquer Case 

The Beauty Prize 

The Mother's Recompense 

The Year of Delight 

In the Tenth Moon 

The Red Mass 

The Three of Clubs 

The Yellow Streak 

The Forbidden Trail 

Lydia of the Pines 

We Must March 

The Virginian 

Bill the Conqueror 

Sam in the Suburbs 

The Second Chance 

Lottery 

A Son of His Father 



Young, Francis Brett 


Sea, Horses 


Young, Francis Brett 


Woodsmoke 


Miscellaneous 




Life of Elbert Gary, the Story of Steel 




From Immigrant to Inventor 


Michael Pupin 


Antobiography of Benjamin Franklin 




Samuel Pepys 


J. L. Dubreton 


Life of Shivaji Maharaj 


Presented 


Plutarch's Lives 


Abridged by Ginn 


Through the Shadows with 0. Henry 


Al. Jennings 


Buffalo Bill's Life Story 


W. F. Cody 


Anna Karenina 


Lyof N. Tolstoi 


Scott's Guy Mannering edited by C. Yonge 


Life of Christ 


Giovanni Papini 



I 



The Last Days of Pompii 
Quo Vadis 

Best Short Stories of 1924 
When we were very Young 
Poe 's Best Tales 

Wit and Humor of American Statesmen 
The Prisoner at the Bar 
Favorite Tales for Story Telling 
A Tenderfoot with Peary 
David goes Voyaging 
Gypsy Fires in America 
A Tropical Tramp with the Tourists 
Jungle Roads 

Into the Frozen South Scout Marr of the Quest Expedition 
Has the North Pole been discovered? T. E. Hal] 

(Presented) 



Bulwer-Lytton 

Hunry Sienkiewicz 

E. J. O'Brien 

A. A. Milne 

Edgar Allen Poe 

Arthur Train 

J. D. Cowles 

George Bosup 

David B. Putnam 

Irving Brown 

H. L. Foster 

Theodore Roosevelt 



The White Devil of the Black Seas 

The Next War Addresses! at Harvard 

The First Time in History 

How to Take out Citizen's Papers 

The Constitution of the United States 

Political Ownership-Electric Light Industry 

What Shall I Be? 

The Book of Athletics 

Home Handy Book 

Carpentry for Beginners 

Tinkering with Tools 

Keeping up with Science 

Biology 

Evolution 

Etiquette 

A Reader's; Guide Book 

Birds of Massachusetts Forbush 



L. S. Palen 

(Presented) 

A. L. Strong 

Presented 

Presented 

Presented 

Clayton H. Ernst 

Paul Withington 

A. F. Collins 

J. D. Adams 

H. H. Savior 

E. E. Slosson 

Vernon Kellog 

Vernon Kellog 

Emily Post 

M. L. Becker 

(Presented) 



Juvenile Department 



Abbott, Jane 
Alcott, Louisa M. 



Larkspur 
Old Fashioned Girl 



58 



Arabian Nights 
Archibald, Mrs. George 
Ashmun, Margaret 
Baldwin, James 
Baldwin, James 
Barbour, Ralph H. 
Barbour, Ralph H. 
Barrett, E. C. 
Barrie, James 
Bates, Katherine Lee 
Bassett, Sara Ware 
Bassett, Sara Ware 
Bassett, Sara Ware 
Bassett, Sara Ware 
Baynes, Ernest H. 
Bennett, Ethel Hume 
Brooks, Amy 
Brooks, Amy 
Brooks Amy 
Brooks, Amy 
Brooks, Amy 
Brooks, Elbridge 
Brown, Edna 
Carroll, Lewis 
Carter, Herbert 
Chase, Annie 
Chaffee, Allen 
Chaffee, Allen 
Chaffee, Allen 
Chase, Mary Ellen 
Cheney, Edward 
Clarke, Covington 
Cobb, B. and E. 
Cobb, B. and E. 
Coffin, Charles Carleton 
Curtis, Alice T. 
Defoe, Daniel 



(Altimus, Rub) 

Lady Gay 

No School Tomorrow 

Gulliver's Travels 

Fifty Famous Stories 

Center Rush Rowland 

Right Guard Grant 

Betty Jane of the House of Smiles 

Peter and Wendy 

In Sunny Spain 

The Story of Leather 

The Story of Silk 

The Story of Sugar 

The Story of Wool 

Polaris, an Eskimo Dog (Presented) 

Judy of York Hill 

Dorothy Dainty's Castle 

Dorothy Dainty at the Shore 

Randy's Summer 

Brandy 's Winter 

Rosalie Dare's Test 

The Heroic Life of Lincoln 

Whistling Rock 

Alices Adv. in Wonderland 

Boy Scouts in France (Presented) 

Boyhood of Famous Americans 

Travels of a Honk-a-Tonk 

Twinkly Eyes, the little Black Bear 

Twinkly Eyes at Valley Farm 

Virginia of Elk Creek 

Scott Burton on the Range 

The Lost Canyon 

Clematis 

Arlo 

The Boys of '76 

A Yankee Girl at Gettysburg 

Robinson Crusoe 



59 



Dodge, Mary Mapes 
Eggleston, Edward 
Eliot, Ethel C. 
Ernst, Clayton H. 
Faris, John T. 
Faris, John T. 
Fisher, Elbert 
Fitzhugh, Percy K. 
French, H. W. 
Giddings. Theodore 
Giddings, Theodore 
Ginther, Pemberton 
Ginther, Pemberton 
Ginther, Pemberton 
Grey, Zane 
Hawkes, Clarence 
Hawkes, Clarence 
Heyliger, William 
Holbrook, Florence 
Irving, Washington 
Judd, Mary C. 
Judson, Clara I. 
Judson, Clara I. 
Judson, Clara I. 
Judson, Clara I. 
Keller, Helen 
Kipling, Rudyard 
Lamb, Charles and Mary 
Lansing, Marion 
Lansing, Marion 
Lawrence, Josephine 
London, Jack 
Long.Wm. J. 
Long, Wm. J. 
Long, Wm. J. 
McLane, F.M. 



Hans Brinker 

The Hoosier Schoolboy 

Buttercup Days 

Mark of the Knife 

Makers of our History 

Real Stories from History 

From San Francisco to Japan 

Westy Martin 

The Lance of Kanana 

.Songs of Childhood 

Introductory Music 

Betsey Hale 

Betsey Hale Tries 

Betsey Hale Succeeds 

The Red headed Outfit 

Dapples of the Circus 

Pal O'Mine 

High Benton 

Nature Myths 

Rip Van Winkle 

Wigwam Stories 

Mary Jane in Canada 

Mary Jane's Country Home 

Mary Jane in New England 

Mary Jane at School 

Story of My Life 

Puck of Pook's Hill 

Tales from Shakespeare 

Life in the Green wood 

Tales of Old England 

Elizabeth Ann and Doris 

Jerry of the Island 

Northern Trails I and II 

Ways of Wood Folks 

Wilderness Ways 

Boy scouts of Lighthouse Troop 



60 



Malone, Cap! P. B. Winning his way to West Point 

(Presented) 

Meadow, Croft Boys 7 Life of Edison 

Meigs, Cornelia Rain on the Roof 

Muir, John Stickeen 

Murlock, Miss Little Lame Prince 

Munroe, Kirk The Flamingo Feather 

Otis, James The Life Savers 

Otis, James Ruth of Boston 

Parkman,Mary Heroes of Today 

Pier, Arthur S. Harding of St. Timothy's 
Porter, Horace Aeroplane Scouts in Russia (Presented) 

Roll Wheeler, Francis Boy with-'U. S. Foresters 

Root, Jean C. Nathan Hale 

Ruskin, John King of the Golden River 

Scott, Everett Third Base Thatcher 

Seaman, Augusta H. Blue Bonnet Bend 

Seaman, Augusta H. Sally Simms Adventures it 
Shaler, Robert Boy Scouts in the Great Flood (Presented) 

Shaler, Robert Boy Scouts of the Life Saving Crew 

(Presented) 
Sidney, Margaret Five Little Peppers, how they grew 

Singmaster, Elsie A Boy at Gettysburg 

Smith, Nora Archibald Children of the Lighthouse 

Smell, Roy J. The Crimson Thread 

Spyri, Johanna _Moni, the Goat Boy 

Stevenson, Robert Louis Child Garden of Verses 

Sutcliffe, Alice Robert Fulton 

Tappan, Eva M. The Golden Goose 

Tornlinson, Everett Scouting with Daniel Boone 

Tomlinson, Everett Scouting with Gen. Funston 

White, Eliza Orne When Molly was Six 

Wiggin, Kate Douglas Polly Oliver's Problem 
Aesops Fables 
Anderson's Fairy Tales 

Bailey, Carolyn Boys and Girls of Pioneer Days 

Bailey, Carolyn Stories from an Indian Cave 

61 



Bailey, Carolyn 
Bailey, Carolyn 
Bannerman, Helen 
Banta, N. M. 
Banta, N. M. 
Blaisdell 
Byington, Eloise 
Chance, Lulu M. 
Children's Cheery Books 
Children's Cheery Books 
Collodi. N. 

Cornman and Gerson 
Donahey, Mary 
Fryer, Jane E. 
Fryer, Jane E. 
Goldman. 
Goodridge, J. F. 
Gordon, Elizabeth 
Hawkes, Ernest 
Haaren, John 
Hopkins, Wm. J, 
Howard, Frank W. 
Hunt, Clara W. 
June, Caroline 
June Caroline 
June, Caroline 
Kirby, E. and M. 
La Rue, Mabel 
Lofting, Hugh 
Mac Harg, William 
Maltby, Ethel 
Maltby, Ethel 
Maltby, Ethel 
Morris, Mrs. J. E. 
Mother Goose Rhymes 
Neher, Bertha 
Olmstead and Grant 



Surprise Stories 

The Wonderful Tree 

Little Black Quibba 

The Brownies and the Goblins 

Ten Little Brownie Men 

Child Life Books one and two 

Doll Land Stories 

Little Folks of Many Lands 

Peter Rabbit 

The Wee wee Woman 

The Heart of Pinoechio 

The Geography Primer 

Best Tales for Children 

Young American Reader: Our Home 

Stories of Every day Friends 

Mother Goose Land 

Mother Goose Melodies 

King Gumdrop 

Eskimo Land 

Fairy Life 

Sand man : More Farm Stories 

Banbury Cross Stories 

Peggy 's Playhouses 

Fifty Indian Legends 

Fifty Famous Stories 

The Social Twins 

Aunt Martha's Corner Cupboard 

In Animal Land 

Story of Mrs. Tubbs 

Let's Pretend 

The Gingerbread Boy 

Animal Story Book 

The Little Red Hen 

Travels of a Waterdrop 

Altemus Pub. 

Among the Giants 

Ned and Nan in Holland 



62 



Orton, Helen F. 
Orton, Helen F. 

Pease, Leonora 
Patri, Angelo 
Perkins, Lucy Fitch 
Perkins, Lucy Fitch 
Serl, Emma 
The Sleepy King 
Smith, Laura R. 
Smith, Laura R. 
Stickney 
Strong, Frances 
Strong, Frances 
Wiltse, Sara B. 
Wood, Mary H. 



American, 

Art Literature, 

Art and Life, 

Baldwin, Fairy Reader 

Beacon, 

Bolemins, 

Browne, 

Elson, 

Eugene Field, 

Everyday Classics, 

Eureka Primer 

Field, 

Happy Children Readers 

Jones, 

Learn to Study, 

McCloskey, 

McManus, Nursery Tales' 

Natural Method 

Pathway to Reading 

Richmond, 



Little Lost Pigs 

Prince and Rover of Clover field 

Four and Twenty Dollies 

Pinoechio in Africa 

Colonial Twins 

Dutch Twins 

Work a- day doings on the Farm 

Altimus Publisher 

Children of Many Lands 

The Pixie on the Farm 

Earth and Sky : Book one 

All the Year Around -Autumn 

All the Year Around- Winter 

Folk Lore Stories 

The Children's First Story Book 



Readers 



One and Two 

One and Two 

Primer 

First and Second 

First and Second 

Primer and First 

Book One 

Primer and First 

Primer 

Primer, First and Second 

Advanced Second 

One and Two 

First and Second 

One and Two 

Primer 

Primer 

First 

First and Second 

Second 



63 



Riverside, Primer 

Sunshine, Primer 

Williams Choice Literature, One and Two 



Magazines 



American Magazine 
Good Housekeeping 
Harper 's Magazine 
Scribner 's Magazine 
National Geographic 
Popular Mechanics 
Review of Reviews 
World's Work 
Science and Invention 
Ladies Home Journal 
Better Homes and Gardens 
Child Life 
Boy's Life 
The American Boy 
St. Nicholas 



64 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1925. 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patrick W. Mullins, Chairman Term Expires 1926 

Harry W. Marsh, Secretary Term Expires 1927 

Mrs, Cora King Graves ' Term Expires 1928 

SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 

177 Prospect St., Northampton Telephone 2103-M 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D. (Center and North Hatfield schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M. D. (Hill, Bradstreet, West Hatfield schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur R. Breor 





SCHOOL CENSUS 








April 1, 


1925 














Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Between 5 and 7 






73 


78 


151 


Between 7 and 14 






278 


267 


545 


Between 14 and 16 






64 


52 


116 


Totals 1925 






415 


397 


812 


Totals 1924 






409 


378 


787 


Totals 1923 






388 


351 


734 



67 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 



First Winter Term — 7 weeks 



Second Term- 



weks 



Spring Term — 7 Aveeks 



Fall Term — 16 weeks 



First Winter Term 



Opens January 4, 1926 
Closes February 19, 1926 

Opens March 1, 1926 
Closes April 23, 1926 

Opens May 3, 1926 
Closes June 18, 1926 

Opens September 7, 1926 
Closes December 23 1926 

Opens January 3 1927 



No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week; re- 
open the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following 
Monday is observed as a, holiday. Legal holidays in Massa- 
chusetts include January first, February twenty-second, April 
nineteenth, May thirtieth, July fourth, the first Monday in 
September, October twelfth, Thanksgiving and Christmas, 



Report of School Committee 



The school population is slightly greater this year than last. 
More pupils are enrolled in the schools. There are 18 more 
pupils in grades 4 to 8 in the Center School than last year. 
These have been so distributed that they are accommodated 
in the regular rooms without additional teachers. 

While the school budget is necessarily larger because of 
this increased school registration, it may be of interest to 
note that it is costing $17.46 per pupil less "than the State 
average for towns of similar' valuation. The total cost per 
pupil in Hatfield is $60.42. The average for similar towns is 
$77.88 per pupil. 

As the school lot at Bradstreet was very small, an addition 
was puchcased in accordance with the vote of the town at the 
last annual meeting. A playground in connection with the 
North Hatfield School was also purchased. All the schools 
now have good playgrounds. • 

The furnace at the Hill School has been repaired and the 
ventilation improved. Some very much needed repairs were 
made at the Center School. 

Plans, specifications and bids were secured for the remodel- 
ing of the North Hatfield building. These provided for ex- 
cavation for a basement under the old part, installation of 
modern sanitary equipment, and a heating and ventilating 
plant as well as the improvement of schoolrooms and new 
hall and stairways. The building is now in as good condition 
as any in town. The heating and ventilating system is so 
installed that it will be adequate for heating and ventilating 
the upper roim if it is ever needed for school purposes, 

A smaller per cent of our teachers secured new positions 
during last vacation. The new teachers who took their places 

69 



are doing excellent work and the schools seem to be progress- 
ing very satisfactorily. 

In the resources, other than taxation, for this year there 
are no receipts from the Academy Trustees. The income from 
some of the funds has been reduced. They are planning to 
make some repairs on the Academy building this next year. 
They are to contribute $1,000 toward the maintainance of the 
schools. The expenses have been kept within the budget 
recived with a balance in the treasury of $247.92 

It is the rule in all towns using the State System of accoun- 
ting- for the town to appropriate the total budget for the 
School Department and then turn into the treasury all money 
received from the State and all other sources. We recommend 
that the two methods be carefully considered when appropria- 
tions are made this year. 

PATRICK W. MULLINS, 

HARRY W. MARSH. 



Financial Statement 

December 31, 1925 





RECEIPTS 




Town Appropriation, 




$39,500.00 


State Fund, 




6.600.00 


Vocational, 




3, 097.27 


Smith- Hughes, 




408.23 


Tuition, 




335.35 


Dog Tax, 




251.64 


Americanization, 




120.00 


Miscellaneous, 




3.80 
• $50,316.29 



70 



EXPENDITURES 

School Committee, $ 185.00 

Superintendents of Schools and 

Attendance Officer, 2 000.00 

Supervisors, 1,720.00 

Teachers— Academy, 10,550.b2 

Teachers— Elementary, 20,824.95 

School Nurse, 900.00 

Americanization, 187.00 

Janitors and Supplies 3,299.16 

Fuel, 3,708.28 

Repairs, 1,096.09 

Books and Supplies, 4,292.36 

Transportation, 645.42 

Miscellaneous, 659.49 



-$50,068.3' 



Balance Unexpended, $ 247.92 

SPECIAL 

Appropriation for Bradstreet School lot, $ 700.00 
Cost of lot, 700.00 



SPECIAL 

Total Appropriation for North Hatfield 

School building, $11,000.00 

Amount expended, Dec. 31, 1925, 6,517.55 



Balance unexpended, $ 4,482.45 

Bills unpaid, 5,913.03 

Extra Appropriatino needed, $ 1,430.58 



71 



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ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 

of the 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

for the 

Year Ending December 31, 1926 



Anker Printing Company 
Holyoke Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 

For Town Meeting, February 7, 1927 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Hatfield in said County, Greeting : — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
town of Hatfield, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, 
to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield oh Monday, the 7th 
day of February, next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following named articles, to wit: — 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: — Town Clerk, three Selectmen, one Assessor for 
3 years, one Water Commissioner for 3 years, Town Treasurer, 
one member of School Committee for 3 years, one Trustee of 
Public Library for 3 years, Auditor, Tree Warden, Elector under 
the Will of Oliver Smith, Tax Collector, Farm Bureau Director, 
Six Constables, all of the foregoing to be voted for on one 
ballot. 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon and 
be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time as the 
majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no case will 
they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the evening. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town officers 
and committees and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to the payment of 
School House Note No. 27 and interest, on Centre School, 
amount recommended $2, 585. 00 

3 



Article 6. To take action in relation to the maintenance of 
ordinar}' repairs on highways, bridges, sewers and side walks 
and raise and appropriate money for the same amount rec- 
ommended 310,000.00 

Article 7. To take action in relation to raising and appro- 
priation of money to pay bonds of town officers. Amount 
recommended 3150. 00 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to defray expense of Memorial Hall for the ensuing year, 
amount recommended 3200.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Tree Warden and Moth Work. 

Amount recommended for Tree Work 3650.00 

Amount recommended for Moth Work 3100.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for inspection, of barns, animals, and stamping. Amount 
recommended 3300.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the maintenance of the Fire Department. 
Amount recommended 31,000.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Insurance. Amount recommended 3810.00 

Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Contingencies. Amount recommended. . .31,000.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for care of the poor for ensuing year. 
Amount recommended 34,000.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for payment of Interest. 
Amount recommended 33,500.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of salaries of town officers for ensuing 
year. Amount recommended 33,300.00 

4 



Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the maintenance of the schools for ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $5 3, 400. 00 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more school physicians. 
Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for care of cemeteries. 
Amount recommended $100.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. Amount recommended $125.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library. Amount recommended $850.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuition of Hatfield students attend- 
ing Smith's Agricultural School. Amount recommended $550.00 

Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County 
Aid to Agriculture per Chap. 273, Acts 1918. 
Amount recommended $150.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for street lights. Amount recommended $4,350.00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Police Protection for the ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $2,800.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to extend the 
South Street sewer and raise and appropriate money for same. 
Amount recommended $500.00 

Article 27. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for purchase of new truck for the highway department. 
Amount recommended $1,800.00 

Article 28. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of the overdraft on North Hatfield 
School job. Amount recommended $1,430.00 

5 



Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money to purchase additional fire fighting apparatus. 
.Amount recommended 31,000-00 



Total appropriations recommended by the Finance 

Committee ' £94,850.00 

As you are faced with the necessity of a new truck for the 
Highway Department, new fire fighting apparatus and possibly 
your own snow removal equipment during the ensuing year. 
your finance committee have not recommended appropriations 
for certain permanent improvements that we personally think 
desirable. 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
HUGH McLEOD, 
WM. L. BELDEN, 

Finance Committee. 



Article 30. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue for the current financial year. 

Article 31. To revise and accept the list of Jurors reported 
by the Selectmen. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the building of sidewalk on Elm Street from 
Brick Schoolhouse to the Tom Fitzgerald place, or any part 
thereol. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the extension of the sewer on King Street. 

Article 34. To see what action the town will take in regard 
to removal or scraping snow from the main highways. 

Article 35. To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen 
to request the B. & M. Transportation Co., to furnish bus 
transportation to those parts of the town not already served 
with transportation facilities. 

Article 36. To see what action the town will take in rela- 
tion to the urgent request of the patrons of the Amherst Gas 
Co., for a prompt reduction in the rates charged. 

And you are directed hereby to serve this Warrant by 
posting up attested copies thereof in five public places in said 
town, seven days at least before time for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk, at the time and place 
of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this the 25th day of January in the 
year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred twenty-seven. 

EDSON W T . STRONG, 
ROBERT J. McGRATH, 2nd, 
DANIEL F. RILEY, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Selectmen's Report 



To : :. •■:.<■ of Hatfield: 

In accordance with the requirements of the Statutes of 
Massachusetts, the following report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1926. is respectfully submitted: 

INSPECTION, ANIMALS, BARXS AXD STAMPING 

Fred T. Bardwell 3300.00 

Appropriation 3300.00 

MEMORIAL HALL 

W. L. Graves 3-85 

North Hatfield Grain Co.. Coal US. : ; 

A". H. Keller. Janitor 75.00 

3194.40 
Appropriation 3200.00 

MEMORIAL DAY 

F. W. Woodward. Band 381.00 

F. G. Howard. Flags 26.02 

S. W. Kingsley. Wreaths 12.00 

3119.02 
Appropriation 3125.00 

STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Co S4.396.00 

Appropriation 34.500.00 

SCFXCL PHYSICIANS 

Dr. Bonneville 350.00 

Dr. Byrne 50.00 

Appropriation 31C0.00 

TREE WARDEN AXD GYFSY MOTH WORK 

M. B. Ryan 3180.00 

John Wenzel 94.00 

J. T. Powers 77.00 

H. L. Stoddard 16.00 

8 



P. Zima §26.25 

J. King 5.50 

Hatfield Garage 40.50 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Inc 8.00 

A. Lacourse 8.75 

Foster & Farrer Co 3.25 

2459.25 
Appropriation 3500.00 

CEMETERIES 

Henry Pellan, Care, Charlott Wilkie Lot 34.00 

Highway Dept., Work, Hill Cemetery 15.00 

219.00 

Appropriation 2100.00 

Sale of Lots 1.00 

BONDS OF TOWN OFFICERS 
Boyle & McGlynn, Tax Collector and Treasurer's 

Bond ' 2149.50 

Appropriation v. 2100.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

A. R. Breor, Chief, Salary.. 22,000.00 

A. R. Breor, Expense, Telephone 42.89 

Chief Bresnahan, Expense 5.00 

Boyle & McGlynn, Insurance 28.00 

Atlantic Refining Co., Oil 15.60 

Chase Motor Co 205.05 

Chilsons Auto Top Shop 65.38 

P. J. Dupree, Liquor Raids 30.00 

A. Florence 185.00 

J. Gocloski 5.00 

F. Harris 5.00 

R.J. Richards 5.00 

J. T. Hughes 15.50 

H.J. Sargent ■ 15.50 

L.J. Levalle 16.50 

F. Feardcn ■ 30.50 

J. I. McCratb 69.00 

9 



Hatfield Garage 3354.62 

Geo. Newman 3 1.00 

Whitcombs Cash Grocery •. 13.21 

Proulx & Fitzgerald 4.07 

Registrar Motor Vehicles 10.00 

Herald Job Print 6.50 

Wm. Thayer 2.07 

S. W. Kingsley 8.00 

Shaw, Hickey & Cook 190.35 

S. Kacinski 1.89 

33,360.63 

Appropriation 32,250.00 

Court Fines 1,262.95 

COUNTY AID TO AGRICULTURE 

Hampshire Trustee to County Aid 3150.00 

Appropriation 3150.00 

NORTH HATFIELD SCHOOL REPAIR JOB 

E. R. Connelly - 33,865.53 

J. B. Kennedy 1,547.00 

Paul Holich, Lot 500.00 

35,912.53 

Balance on Hand, December 31, 1925 4,482.45 

Overdraft 31,430.08 

POOR 

City of Holyoke 31,535.33 

City of Northampton 656.60 

Town Aid 923.50 

Department of Public Welfare 90.00 

Mass. Hospital School 390.86 

Treasurer Hampshire Co 226.28 

Dr. Byrne 31.00 

J. S. Bardwell 43.00 

10 



Shea & Fortsch 326.88 

F. G. Howard 25.58 

33,949.03 

Appropriation 33,500.00 

From State 132.00 

LIBRARY 

American Book Co . 35.09 

Amherst Gas Co. . . 19.70 

Carrie C. Cutter 16.75 

Commissioner of Public Safety 2.00 

Gaylord Bros 3.90 

Gazette Printing Co 12.62 

Ginn & Co ,...'.. 28.09 

Harlem Book Co , 6.21 

Library Book House 70.96 

Library Bureau 3.25 

Standard Book Co 5.36 

Sherwoods 352.47 

Lnion Library Association 12.11 

Longmans, Green 5.99 

H. R. Hunting Co 19.30 

Ellen A. Waite 180.80 

Eleanor Howard 48.15 

Madeline Lang 14.40 

V. S. Keller 35.40 

Mrs. S. Kacinski 6.00 

Margaret Whalen . 5.40 

3853.95 

Appropriation 3850.00 

Sale of Books and Paper 12.60 

NORTH STREET ROAD 

Barrett Co 3403.00 

A. H. Beers 5.00 

J. L. Boyle 64.00 

W. E. Boyle 60.00 

Estate, A. L. Strong 60.00 

11 



J. S. Bradwell 362.00 

Mrs. L. H. Kingsley 65.00 

T. Kelliher 7.00 

Sabin Coal Co , 12.53 

Kimball Cary Co 10.76 

North Hatfield Grain Co 19.34 

J. S. Lane & Son., Inc 976.82 

M. B. Ryan 186.00 

J. W. Wentzel 112.00 

H. L. Stoddard 126.00 

J. T. Powers .. 94.50 

P. Zima • 80.50 

F. Johnson : 101.50 

T. Masenowski 29.75 

H. Wolfram 6.50 

Chas. Merrill 42.00 

22,524.20 

Appropriation £2,000.00 

From County Commissioners 300.00 

From John C. Ryan 200.00 

INSURANCE 

Boyle & McGlynn , 3112.40 

Howard & Woodward 981.06 

£1,093.46 

Appropriation #1,250.00 

Refund from Liability Policy 59.60 

INTEREST 

State Treasurer ?780.00 

Northampton National Bank 3,075.00 

M. J. Ryan, Treasurer Sinking Fund . 420.00 

?4,275.00 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Receipts, Northampton Nat. Bank. . 149.70 
L. A. Deinlein, Treas., Water Board 800.00 

12 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

American Steam Pump Co $450.00 

Auto Fire Equipment Co 10.22 

P. E. Balise, Chief, Salary 135.00 

Pioneer Rubber Co 88.00 

J. L. Day 15.00 

J.J. Bestold 15.00 

C. H. Crafts 15.00 

H. W. Marsh 17.00 

W. E. Boyle 15.00 

Coburn & Graves 1.80 

Hatfield Garage 370.41 

H.J. Purseglove.. 18.50 

Jo Slussars .-•■•■ 6.36 

Nicholas Ney 21.60 

S. Vachula 15.40 

F. Dickinson 18.40 

L. Vachula 13.80 

J. Kacinski 12.00 

J. Kennedy 10.20 

Chas. Holt 11.80 

D. Walsh 11.80 

R. Dickinson 7.20 

R. Kennedy 7.20 

Chas. Slattery 7.20 

Paul Vachula 4.00 

C. H. Crafts . ' 7.00 

John Small 28.00 

J. Wenzel 12.00 

Tom Wicklas 15.00 

Henry Labbee • 16.00 

Franklin Shea 7.00 

Adolph Toczko 24.00 

John Zagrodnik 14.00 

Al Kent 2.00 

H. Pellam 16.00 

M. B. Ryan 17.00 

Allen Smith 15.00 

Leonard Wenzel 10.00 

13 



Peter Gallant £5.00 

Jo Zagrodnik 5.00 

Mike Gogle . . 9.00 

Orin Graves 6.00 

C. Fox . .... . ... 6.00 

Raymond Balise 5.00 

Chas. Winters 4.00 

S. Yarrows 2.00 

Tony Staszko 4.00 

S. Vishaway 2.00 

Eureka Fire Hose Co 16.00 

21,544.89 
Appropriation #1,500.00 

CONTINGENT 

Amherst Gas Co 35.54 

Auto Tax List !" 5.00 

W. P. Boyle 72.25 

Dr. Bonneville . . 7.25 

Dr. Byrne 7.50 

Bancroft Press 24.00 

Boyle & McGlynn, Care Bridge St. Common 25.00 

P. E. Chew, Mortgage Records Book 15.00 

C. D. Reese, Dog Tags 7.67 

C. D. Chase 20.30 

Mrs. Dehey 36.58 

Director of Accounts 14.00 

W. & L. E. Gurley 21.43 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Inc : 22.51 

Commissioner of Public Safety .50 

M. H. Dwight, Postage 16.00 

F. G. Howard 1.90 

V. H. Keller 10.15 

Hobbs & Warren 13.34 

J. W. Heffernan 2.60 

A. H. Irvine Co 4.07 

Merrick Lumber Co 196.81 

P. B. Murphy 3.75 

J. L. McGrath 9.55 

14 



MaxKugler 36.00 

North Hatfield Grain Co 39.42 

M.J. O'Neil 65.00 

W. C. Tannant 86.00 

Northampton Commercial College 2.70 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co 53.31 

Metcalf Printing Co., Town Reports 182.40 

Metcalf Printing Co., Ballots 29.50 

Shaw, Hickey & Cook 629.26 

Stevens & Andre, Aloisa Case 992.24 

Webster Box Co 777 

H. Pellam, Care Town Clock 25.00 

H. Pellam, Janitor Town Hall, Mowing Lawn 25.50 

A. H. Wicklas, Care Post Office Common, and Mem- 
orial Hall Lawn ..' 50.00 

Estate, A. L. Strong, Wood, Town Hall 52.00 

Rev. S. C. Zdebl, Damage to Hedge 4.00 

^2,792.80 

Appropriation 31,200.00 

Receipts : 

Aloisa Check. 1,000.00 

School Rent 43.00 

Ball Team, Telephone Calls 10.95 

J. C. Ryan, Binder 3.75 

City of Northampton 370.72 

Cash in Safe. 26.62 

Wright & Potter .70 



32,655.74 

SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS 

E. W. Strong, Chairman 3150.00 

R. J. McGrath 75.00 

D. F. Riley 75.00 

C. E. Warner, '25 and '26 Auditor 20.00 

M. H. Dwight, Balance of 1925 Assessors Salary. . . 178.98 

M. H. Dwight, Balance of 1926 Assessors Salary. . . 189.00 

M. H. Dwight, Balance 1924 Tax Collectors Salary 175.00 

M. H. Dwight, Balance 1925 Tax Collectors Salary 500.00 

15 



F. Jubenville, Stamping #19.20 

V. H. Keller, Town Clerk, Clerk Board Selectmen.. 1,200.00 

V. H. Keller, Registrar 10.00 

.Marion C. Billings, Ballot Clerk 15.00 

Mrs. Catherine Mullaney, Ballot Clerk 15.00 

Joseph Godin, Ballot Clerk . 15.00 

M. Crawford, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

Dewey J. Ryan 5.00 

Jas. J. Fitzgerald, Sealers Salary and Mileage 162.30 

John R. McGrath, Assessor Salary 304.85 

T. W. Ryan, Registrar '25 and '26 20.00 

L. Billings, Registrar '25 and '26 20.00 

Chas. Flynn, Registrar '25 and '26 20.00 

J. R. McGrath, Ballot Clerk 10.00 

33,189,33 

Appropriation 33,300.00 

SMITHS AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition of Students Attending Smith School 31,050.00 

Appropriation 3500.00 

Due from State 511.88 

Names of Students Attending Smith School 
Zygmund Borowski Michael Filipek 

Malcolm Frisbee Frank Novak 

George Omasta Michael Raff a 

Frank Wesolowski 

SCHOOL HOUSE NOTE AND INTEREST 

Note No. 26 Paid through Northampton Nat. Bank 32,000.00 
Interest Paid through Northampton Nat. Bank. . . . 675.00 

32,675.00 
Appropriation 32,675.00 

SCHOOLS 

Retirement Net 
Fees Salary 

F. M. Gifford, Principal 3100.00 32,390.00 

F.H.Hale 54.00 1,026.00 

16 



Retirement Net 

Fees Salary 

E.J. Burke 32,533.28 

H. E. Rollins ?22.50 427.50 

Mae E. Toole 69.82 1,326.68 

Mary E. Ryan 69.65 1,323.35 

Louise R. Brisbee 39.00 741.00 

Maxine M. Blanchard 26.00 494.00 

C. J. Larkin, Principal 89.55 1,701.45 

Mrs. Mary B. Powers 1,170.00 

Margaret A. Ryan 995.00 

Sarah V. Kiley 992.50 

Mrs. Grace W. Bardwell 957.50 

Mrs. Constance Mullaney 995.00 

Mary E. Fenton 47.00 893.00 

Margaret O'Donnell 47.00 893.00 

Mrs. Mary L. Bourdon 600.00 

Hilda Corman 50.00 950.00 

Mrs. Lena P. Fitzgerald 1,000.00 

Mrs. C. B. Harris 54.45 1,034.55 

Margaret M. Nolan 50.00 950.00 

Kathleen Connelly 45.50 864.50 

Leonie Bertrand 27.00 513.00 

Mrs. Mary Donellson 950.00 

Theresa C. Kondrat 18.00 342.00 

Ellen O'Hara 17.77 337.73 

Mary C. Kelly 18.00 342.00 

H. L. Ford. . . 72.00 968.00 

Margaret E. Schmitter 50.00 950.00 

Maud E. Boyle 912.50 

Mary E. Boyle 30.00 570.00 

Eleanor Whalen 49.50 940.50 

Mrs. Bernice B. Ormond 85.00 790.00 

J. L. Lacey 10.40 197.60 

Jas. J. Fitzgerald 201.00 

Substitute Teachers 

Marion C. Billings 3112.00 

Mrs. Marion Clark 125.00 

Mrs. E. L. Graves . . 82.50 

17 



Mrs. C. K. Graves £21.00 

Margaret P. Ryan 42.50 

Hildegarde Kolbe 15.00 

Mrs. Margaret Mullaney 10.00 

Mrs. Margaret Brooks 30.00 

Canning Course 

Anna Belden £94.00 

Superintendent 

O. A. Morton £100.00 £1,599.92 

O. A. Morton, Office and Traveling Expense 377.64 

Attendance Officer 

A. R. Breor £300.00 

Janitors 

Frank Brehm £1,950.00 

Geo. Dick Kigsley 360.00 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl .' 264.00 

Mrs. J. K. Holt 262.00 

L. Trecartin 318.00 

Supplies. . 58.95 

School Nurse 

Gertrude Phillips ; . . £600.00 

Marion Holmes 333.32 

Fuel 

Kimball & Cary Co., Coal £1,379.80 

North Hatfield Grain Co., Coal 2,149.13 

Webster Box Co., Coal 951.32 

Estate, A. L. Strong, Wood 26.00 

Jas. Coffey, Wood 24.00 

F. T. Bardwell 16:00 

Repairs 

W. P. Boyle £205.25 

Conn Dry Goods Co 39.88 

Foster-Farrer Co 16.96 

W. L. Graves 57.47 

W. W. Gore 10.00 

Holland Furnace Co 27.00 

Highway Dept 13.50 

F. G.Howard 9.13 

18 



J. B. Kennedy 336.08 

Merrick Lumber Co 114.07 

J. Reagan 10.70 

W. H. Riley & Co 19.90 

J. A. Sullivan 3.50 

J. J. Hogan 191.17 

Slating Slate Co 15.00 

E. W. Strong 8.00 

North Hatfield Grain Co 10.20 

School Committee 

P. W. Mullins, Salary 1925 $75.00 

H. W. Marsh, Salary 1925 60.00 

Expense 3.00- 

New Equipment 

Bean Spray Pump Co. 336.00 

J. W. Heffernan 11.60 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins ' 63.68. 

New England Oil Burner Co 55.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., New Furnace, Bradstreet School 650.00 

Miscellaneous 636.05 

Transportation 

B. & M. Trans. Co $426.00 

Northampton St. Ry. Co 140.00 

Whitcombs Cash Grocery 464.00 

Stanley Kacinski 8.00 

Books and Supplies 2,997.85 

$51,443.35 

Appropriation .$51,100.00 

Smith-Hughes Fund 350.05 

HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES AND SIDEWALKS 

Amherst Gas Co., Lighting Underpass Signs $44.16 

Atlantic Refining Co 27.50 

Bisbee Brothers 180.00 

Buffalo Springfield Roller Co 296.17 

E. A. Breor 12.00 

John Bowowski 2.00 

J. L. Boyle 261.00 

19 



Raymond Balise £16.00 

Gordon Billings 3.25 

Ralph Boyle 8.00 

W. E. Boyle 9.00 

B. &M. R. R 22.49 

M. C. Bailey Co.,, Inc 25.60 

Barrett Co 1,812.06 

J. R. Coffey 154.00 

H. W. Carl 140.00 

F. Betsold 12.00 

M. H. Dwight 72.00 

S. S. Dwight, Express Charges 3.78 

Tom O'Dea 3.25 

A. Doppman 22.00 

F. Doppman 28.00 

L. Deinlein 4.00 

Wm. Englehardt 4.00 

Chas. Eberlein 96.35 

C. Fox 3.25 

John Filpek 2.00 

Foster-Farrer 66.16 

Orin Graves 10.00 

Ray Gore 2.00 

Francis Godin 3.25 

W. L. Graves 2.75 

M. J. Gleason 62.70 

Geo. Howard 18.00 

Wm. Hayes 32.00 

Jack Howard 3.25 

Chas. Hafey - 8.00 

Hampshire Auto Parts Co 1.50 

F. G. Howard 33.70 

Howard & Woodward 47.40 

Hatfield Garage 1,716.51 

Frank Johnson 92.75 

John Jenski 14.00 

S. W. Kingsley 13.25 

Kendall Brush & Broom Co 31.63 

Paul Levitre 24.00 



20 



J. S. Lane & Son, Inc £858.59 

T. Masenowski 197.75 

P. Malinowski 32.75 

R. J. Merrick 20.00 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co 25.40 

North Hatfield Grain Co 21.67 

Norwood Engineering Co 3.00 

Proulx & Fitzgerald 23.80 

M. B. Ryan, Supt 1,422.00 

M. B. Ryan, Telephone Tolls 3.70 

M.J. Ryan 35.76 

W. H. Riley & Co 20.35 

J. T. Powers 507.50 

H. L. Stoddard 343.00 

J. H. Pierce 1.35 

Allen Smith 4.25 

H. D. Smith 6.00 

J. S. Stenglein 4.00 

J. A. Sullivan & Co 4.00 

Sabin Coal Co 11.38 

G. P. Trowbridge 4.00 

Jo Parent 3.25 

Northampton Water Dept . 14.75 

N. E. Road Machinery Co. ... • 10.50 

F. E. Sanderson 20.88 

B. Vollinger. .'. -.-...' 14.00 

Jo Vollinger 19.50 

Whitcomb Cash Grocery 7.12 

Register Motor Vehicles 2.00 

Webster Box Co 6.27 

John Wenzel 606.00 

P. Zima 267.75 



39,968.98 



Appropriation 310,000.00 

Receipts 358.29 



Cost of snow removal for 1926 included in the above 31,650.28 



21 



MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS PAID 

E. L. Graves, Refund on 1920 Tax Collections 322.92 

Forest Fires 35.80 

License Fees Refunded 8.00 



366.72 
No Appropriations. 

TOWN HALL ACCOUNT 

Amherst Gas Co " 320.33 

W. P. Boyle, Repairs 22.40 

342.73 
Receipts 

Basket Ball 37.50 

Dances 50.50 

Polish Societies 6.00 

364.00 

WESTFIELD STATE SANATORIUM 

Board and Medical Care Michael Kurasiewicz 3101.00 

By Cash, John Kurasiewicz 101.00 

RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

Bonds of Town Officers . 3149.50 

Cemeteries 19.00 

County Aid to Agriculture 150.00 

Contingent 2,792.80 

Fire Department 1,544.89 

Highways, Bridges, Sidewalks, etc 9,968.98 

North Street Road 2,524.20 

Inspection of Barns and Animals, Stamping 300.00 

Insurance 1,093.46 

Interest 4,275.00 

Library 853.95 

Memorial Hall 194.40 

Memorial Day 119.02 

Police Dept 3,360.63 

Poor 3,949.03 

Schools 51,443.35 

22 



North Hatfield School Repair Job £5,912.53 

School House Note and Interest 2,675.00 

Smith Agricultural School, Tuition 1,050.00 

School Physicians 100.00 

Street Lights 4,396.00 

Salaries of Town Officers 3,189.33 

E. L. Graves 22.92 

Forest Fires 35.80 

License Fees Refund 8.00 

Tree Warden and Gypsy Moth 459.25 

Town Hall 42.73 

Westfield State Sanatorium 101.00 



£100,730.14 

Total Appropriations, Feb. 1, 1926. .£89,700.00 
Balance Unexpended on North Hat- 
field School Job, Dec. 31, 1925. . . . 4,482.45 
Receipts credited to Town Accounts 5,429.16 
Overdrawn 1,118.53 



£100,730.14 
Respectfully submitted, 
EDSON W. STRONG, 
ROBERT J. McGRATH, 2nd, 
DANIEL F. RILEY, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 
January 19, 1927. 

I have examined the books of the Selectmen and find them 
correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 



23 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1927 

Clarence E. Belden 
Clifford L. Belden 
Frank J. Betsold 
Samuel F. Billings 
John B. Bitner 
Roswell G. Billings 
Carleton H. Crafts 
Henry Charlebois 
John H. Day 
Adam Doppman 
Joseph Dippolt 
George A. Deinlein 
Wm. F. Englehardt 
Ercent Godin 
Frederick Jubinville 
Walter H. Hadley 
Albert J. Labbee 
Charles E. Morton 
James L. McGrath 
Fred A. Pease 
Charles Pfieffer 
John T. Powers 
Daniel F. Riley 
Michael Saydlewski 
Charles Slattery 
John L. Sheehan 
M. B. Ryan 
George O. Whitcomb 
Francis Levett 
Malcolm Crawford 
Charles Winters 



24 



Treasurer's Report 



V. H. KELLER, Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield 

Dr. 
To Balance in Northampton National Bank, Jan- 
uary 1st, 1926 31,905.74 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1924 Property Tax 13,248.95 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1925 Property Tax 30,217.54 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1925 Poll Tax 116.00 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1926 Poll Tax 958.00 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1926 Property Tax 42,660.30 

E. L. Graves, 1923 Tax 17.00 

K. H. Stone, Treasurer, Dog Tax Refunded ....... 235.17 

Aloisi check reentered 1,000.00 

A. Donnis, Rent School 40.00 

H. W. Marsh, Rent School Hall 3.00 

Hatfield Ball Team, Telephone 10.95 

Wright & Potter Ptg. Co., Refund .70 

J. C. Ryan, Paper Fastener .' 3.75 

City of Northampton, Tuition 370.72 

Cash Found in Safe 26.62 

O. Millard, Digging Grave 6.00 

Highway Dept., Taking Down Tree 5.00 

Dietz Baking Co., Damage to Fence 10.00 

L. A. Deinlein, Highway Dept. Work 54.34 

L. A. Deinlein, Interest , 800.00 

L. A. Deinlein, Sinking Fund 360.00 

Mike Janos, Highway Dept 8.20 

Yarrows & Klocko, Highway Dept 22.50 

Blasburg, Highway Dept 30.00 

N. Staszko, Highway Dept 15.00 

Howard & Woodward, Insurance Refund 59.60 

Northampton National Bank, Interest 149.70 

Library, Sale of Books 12.60 

License Fees 121.00 

Sealers Fees, J. J. Fitzgerald 45.83 

Court Fines, Police Dept 1,262.95 

County Commissioners, North Street Road 300.00 

25 



John C. Ryan, North Street Road 3200.00 

Treasurer of the Commonwealth, Vocational Edu- 
cation 2,836.34 

English Speaking Classes 18.88 

Smith-Hughes Fund Used for Schools Only. . . 350.05 

Mothers Aid, Refund 132.00 

Corporation Tax 1,470.36 

Income Tax, 1923 . . 76.50 

Income Tax, 1924 96.90 

Income Tax, 1925 290.00 

Income Tax, 1926 11,628.61 

Income Tax, 1926 Special 3,200.00 

National Bank Tax . . . 332.88 

Trust Co. Tax. . .. . 82.94 

Henry Pellam, Town Hall Rents 64.00 

John Kuriesiewicz, Westfield Sanatorium 101.00 

Smith Academy 500.00 

O. Millard, Cemetery Plot .50 

Paul Zima, Cemetery Plot .50 

Town of Whately, Use of Road Roller 181.25 

St. Joseph's Church, Highway Dept 41.25 

Job Work, Highway Dept 5.00 

Temporary Loans: 

Note No. 29 Dated March 3, 1926 10,000.00 

Note No. 32 Dated June 7, 1926 10,000.00 

Note No. 33 Dated Sept. 10, 1926 10,000.00 

Note No. 34 Dated Sept. 27, 1926 15,000.00 

Note No. 36 Dated Nov. 2, 1926 9,500.00 



3170,150.87 



Cr. 

By Selectmen's Orders Paid 3100,730.14 

County Tax 11,822.12 

Treasurer Commonwealth, State Tax. 6,960.00 

State Highways 708.00 

Soldiers Exemption 8.68 

Trust Co. Tax 1922 139.69 



26 



Bills Payable: 

Note No. 29 Due Sept. 10, 1926. £10,000.00 

Note No. 30 Due Nov. 11, 1926.. 20,000.00 

Note No. 32 Due Dec. 6, 1926. . . 10,000.00 

M. J. Ryan, Treas. Sinking Fund . . . . 360.00 

Balance on Hand 9,422.24 



3170,150.8? 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Dr. 

No. 31 Dated May 14, 1926, 1 yr... . $40,000.00 

J No. 33 Dated Sept. 10, 1926, 6 mo... 10,000.00 

No. 34 Dated Sept. 27, 1926, 6 mo. . 15,000.00 

No. 36 Dated Nov. 2, 1926, 6 mo. . . . 9,500.00 

Over Draft on North Hatfield School Job 1,430.08 



Outstanding 



$75,930.08 



Cr. 

By Cash on Hand $9,422.24 

Uncollected Taxes, 1924 422.24 

Uncollected Taxes, 1925 18,676.90 

Uncollected Taxes, 1926 46,266.14 

Bills Due Town: 

N. Staszke. $16.00 

P. Zima ' 19.75 

From State 873.60 

Balance Against Town 233.11 

$75,930.08 

January 19, 1927. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending Dec. 31, 
1926, and find them correct. I find Selectmen's orders on file 
and paid, for one hundred thousand, seven hundred thirty dol- 
lars ($100,730.14) and fourteen cents, also canceled notes and 
'receipts for State and County Taxes and other items paid. 
Balance on hand $9,422.24. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 

11 



TAX COLLECTORS REPORT 
MYRON H. D WIGHT, Collector 



1924 PROPERTY TAX 

Warrant .- £88,699.15 

Interest Collected 1,908.43 



£90,607.58 

Cash Paid Town Treas. 1924. §49,670.82 

Cash Paid Town Treas. 1925 26,317.88 

Cash Paid Town Treas. 1926 13,248.95 

Total Cash £89,237.65 

Uncollected Person Tax Secured by Lien . 75. 18 

Uncollected Real Estate Tax Protected 
by Preferred Claim in Bankrupcy 
Court £347.24 

Abatements 947.51 

— £90,607.58 

1925 POLL TAX 

To Uncollected Jan. 1st, 1926 £246.00 

By Cash Paid Town Treasurer £116.00 

By Uncollected Dec. 31, 1926 130.00 

— ■ £246.00 

1925 PROPERTY TAX 

To Uncollected, Jan. 1st, 1926 £47,941.70 

Interest Collected 822.74 

£48,764.44 

By Cash Paid Town Treasurer £30,217.54 

By Uncollected Dec. 31, 1926 18,546.90 

£48,764.44 

1926 POLL TAX 

To Warrant £1,328X0 

By Cash Paid Town Treasurer £958.00 

By Uncollected Dec. 31, 1926 370.00 

■ £1,328.00 

28 



1926 PROPERTY TAX 

To Warrant £88,383.59 

1st Addition 48.32 

2nd Addition 98.30 

Interest Collected 57.21 



,587.42 

By Cash Paid Town Treasurer $42,660.30 

By Abatements 30.98 

By Uncollected Dec. 31 . . 45,722.28 

By Cash on Hand 173.86 

— ; ?88,587.42 

January 19, 1927. 

I have this day examined the books of the Tax Collector 
and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 



29 



REPORT OF SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

Resources on Hand Dec. 31, 1926 
Hatfield Water Bonds, Nos. 40, 41, 42, 43, 48, 49 and 

50 37,000.00 

N. Y., N. H., & H., R R,Bonds, Nos. 4359 and 60 4's 

1957 2,000.00 

Easthampton Savings Bank 1,426.80 

Springfield Institute for Savings 227.42 

Springfield Five Cents Savings Bank 263.12 

Mechanics Savings Bank, Holyoke 153.22 

First National Bank, Northampton 1,188.19 

Northampton National Bank 3,986.58 

N. Y., N. H., & H., R. R. Coupons 40.00 



216,285.33 
M. J. RYAN, 
JOHN J. BESTOLD, 
ERCENT E. GODIN, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 
January 19, 1927. 

I have this day examined the accounts and receipts of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them as reported. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 



30 



Police Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31st, 1926 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1926 98 

Males 94 

Females 4 

—98 
Offences for which Arrests were made 

Auto Violations 24 

Drunkenness 18 

Assault and Battery ' 1 

Liquor Violations 21 

Larceny 6 

Junk Dealers, No License 6 

Disturbing the Peace 2 

Returned to Veterans Hospital 6 

Returned to State Hospital 6 

Vagrancy 4 

Returned to Lyman School 1 

Brought to Tewkesbury 3 

98 
Total Fines District Court . 32,767.95 

Of this amount #155. was for violation of automobile laws, 
31,350 was appealed to Superior Court, leaving a balance of 
31,262.95 returned to the Town. 

We have had very few serious accidents this past year 
compared with other years. One fatal accident and several 
minor ones. 

We have had some trouble with heavy trucks breaking 
through some of our bridges, two bridges were broken on 
Chestnut Street, and also Kingsley's Bridge was damaged. 
The owner, of the truck, that broke one of the Chestnut Street 
bridges made restitution of $70., and the other one made resti- 
tution of 360. There has been no settlement as yet for Kings- 

31 



ley Bridge. I would recommend that all bridges be double 
planked as it would save a lot of time and trouble. 

All of these bridges have been posted as to capacity and in 
two instances these signs have been taken down and some more 
have been defaced. The law says that a bridge must be posted 
with a sign on each end that can be read at a distance of fifty 
feet. 

Now when some one takes down or defaces a poster on 
any bridge if a truck should break through said bridge the 
Town is liable for damage. Any one caught taking down or 
defacing any of these signs will find that it is a very serious 
offence and punishable by a large fine or jail. 

Another thing that I would like to suggest at this time 
and that is taking up the watering tub on Main Street. Now 
in more ways than one this tub is a nuisance in the center of 
the road, children go to it and it is very dangerous more so on 
Sunday mornings when they come from church they run out 
to the tub not looking whether or not there are any auto- 
mobiles coming. Besides that it is not in working order half 
of the time it is either clogged up or broken and the water 
running into the street. 

I think that if it is necessary to have a drinking fountain 
that it could be arranged to have it near the sidewalk, that is 
about all this tub is used for. 

Our police car is in very good shape and I would recommend 
that it be run another year. Permit me to take this occasion 
to express my appreciation of your very real support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 
Chief of Police. 



32 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 
BIRTHS 

MONTHS A^l^ll^l^Q^ 

Male 326232222023 29 

Female 311302211012 17 



Total 637534433035 46 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Male Female 

United States 8 16 

Poland. -33 25 

Czecho-Slovakia 4 4 

Germany 1 1 

46 46 
BIRTHS FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



1921 1922 1923 
95 83 88 


1924 

88 


1925 

52 


MARRIAGES . ^ c ^ x v 
BY MONTHS ^ £ S < 1 ^ 

2 3 10 2 


1 


bo 




& ti o 8 3 
c£ O £ Q H 

2 5 1 1 18 


First Marriage of Both, 16. 
Second of Groom, 1. 
Oldest Groom, 32. 
Youngest Groom, 20 
Oldest Bride, 32 
Youngest Bride, 17. 








BIRTHPLACE 
United States 






Groom Bride 
16 18 


Poland 






2 — 



18 18 

33 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Hattie M. Donelson 
Roman Rogaleski 
Henry Skarzinski 
Abbie F. Billings 
George J. Bitner 
David Carpenter 
Patrick Brennan 
Alexander Dombrowski 
Thomas Yarrows 
Alice A. Lyons 
Paul Lesokoski 
Elizabeth Zapka 

Age of oldest person deceased 



Julia M. Pasek 

• Wojner 

Gladys Koblanski 
Michael Raffa 
Mirris D. Billings 
Thomas J. Coffey 
Margaret D. Powers 
Cheistine Osley 
Michael Wastak 
Nelson Allaire 
Margaret D. Graves 
Anna B. Strong 
(female) 99 years. 



DOGS LICENSED 

144 Male Dogs @ 32.00 each 3288.00 

27 Female Dogs @ 35.00 each 135.00 

3423.00 
Less Fees 171 Dogs @ 20c each 3 34.20 

3388.80 
Paid County Treasurer . 3388.80 



34 



NOTICE 

All Dogs Must Be Licensed on or 
Before March 31st 1927 

Extracts from Chapter 140, General Laws of Massachu- 
setts Section 137. The owner or keeper of a dog which is three 
months old or over shall annually on or before March 31, cause 
it to be registered, numbered, described and licensed for one 
year from the first day of April following. 

Sec. 138. The owner or keeper of a dog may at any time 
have it licensed until the first day of April following, and a 
person who becomes the owner or keeper of a dog after April 
first which is not duly licensed, and the owner or keeper of a 
dog which becomes three months old after March 31 in any 
year shall, when it is three months old, cause it to be registered, 
numbered, described, licensed and collared as required by 
preceding section. 

Respectfully submitted, 
V. H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 



35 



Assessors' Report 

1926 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate 3589,537.00 

Value of Assessed Real Estate 2,172,453.00 

Total Value of Assessed Estate 32,761,990.00 

Value of Assessed Buildings 31,212,360.00 

Value of Assessed Land 960,093.00 

32,172,453.00 

Number of Polls Assessed 664 

Residents Assessed on Property 574 

Non-Residents Assessed on Property 73 

Number of Persons Assessed on Property 866 

For Poll Tax Only 219 

Rate of Tax per 31,000.00. 332.00 

Number of Horses Assessed 352 

Number of Cows Assessed -307 

Number of Neat Cattle Assessed 53 

Number of Sheep 117 

Number of Fowls 822 

Number of Dwelling Houses 462 

Acres of Land 9,050 

State Tax 36,960.00 

State Highway Tax 3708.00 

County Tax 311,822.12 

Town Tax , 367,971.39 

Overlayings 32,250.17 

Addition to Warrant 3146.62 

Estimated Receipts: 

Bank and Corporation Tax 34,400.00 

Income Tax 311,628.61 

All Others 35,700.00 

Value of Property Exempt from Tax under Chap. 
59, General Laws: 

Church Property 353,700.00 

Town Property 3261,900.00 

Respectfully submitted. 
JOHN R. McGRATH, ) 

MYRON H. DWIGHT, !► , ""1°^ 
VERNETH. KELLER,J 0/i/ *^ 
36 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 31st annual 
report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: 

Balance on Deposit, First National Bank 33,572.44 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

Deposit Amherst Savings Bank 1,836.95 

Deposit Northampton National Bank. . 2,402.31 

Deposit First National Bank Saving Dept 1,123.35 

Deposit Northampton Institution for Saving. ..... 1,208.22 

Three Boston & Maine R. R. Bonds 3,000.00 

Cash from Collector of Water Rates 5,858.78 

Interest on Deposits and Bonds 554.83 

Cash from Broken Hydrants 100.00 

320,656.88 
We have paid the past year as follows: 

George F. Merrill, Surveys and Estimates 3445.00 

F. M. Crittenden, Printing Water Bills 13.00 

Shaw, Hickey & Cook, Professional Service 15.00 

Red Hed Mfg. Co., Parts, Tapping Machine 11.43 

Boyle & McGlynn, Treasurer Bond 12.00 

Water Commissioner's Salaries 100.00 

W. L. Graves, Labor and Supplies 31.85 

L. A. Deinlein, Labor and Cash Paid 39.65 

Town of Hatfield Highway Dept., Labor 54.34 

Joseph F. Chandler, Labor 48.00 

Town of Hatfield, Water Rates 1,160.00 

M. C. Bailey & Co., Inc., Lumber 7.25 

First National Bank, Rental of Box No. 193 5.00 

E. W. Strong, Collector, Labor and Cash Paid 583.26 

Northampton Machine & Welding Co., Welding. . . 18.19 



32,543.97 
Balance in Treasury: 

Cash on Deposit First National Bank 33,281.28 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

37 



Northampton Institution for Savings 32,263.19 

Nonotuck Savings Bank 2,015.00 

Florence Savings Bank 2,000.00 

Northampton National Bank Savings Dept 2,475.31 

First National Bank Savings Dept . 1,199.87 

Amherst Savings Bank 1,878.26 

Hampshire County Trust Co 2,000.00 



318,112.91 
Respectfully submitted, 
J. W. KILEY, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 
L. A. DEINLEIN, 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Water Commissioners of the Town of Hatfield and I find them 
correct with orders on file for all payments made and a balance 
of 318,112.91 in the treasury. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 
January 19, 1927. 



38 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

During the year 1926, 357 books' have been added to the 
library, 347 by purchase, ten presented, 183 were for the Ju- 
venile Department. 

The circulation of books and magazines has been 6,969 in 
the Adult Department, 6,676 in the Juvenile, making a total 
circulation of 13,64-5. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Balance from Fines of 1925 3 .49 

Fines, 1926 8.75 

From Sale of Old Paper ". . 2.90 

— 312.14 

Supplies 34.04 

Postage and Express 33.99 

Book 1.20 

Balance on Hand 2.91 

■ 312.14 

ELLEN A. WAITE, 

Librarian 



BOOKS ENTERED 

Fiction 
Aldrich, Bess Streeter 
Adams, Samuel Hopkins, 
Bailey, Temple, 
Balmer, Edwin, 
Bassett, Sara Ware, 
Bennet, Robert Ames, 
Bindloss, Harold, 
Bindloss, Harold, 
Bojer, Johan, 
Bowen, Marjorie, 
Bower, B. M., 
Bower, B. M., 
Bower, B. M., 



DURING 1926 

The Cutters 

Revelry 

The Blue Window 

That Royle Girl 

The Green Dolphin 

The Cattle Baron 

The Broken Trail 

Pine Creek Ranch 

The Last of the Vikings 

Mistress Nell Gwyn 

Bellehelen Mine 

The Eagle's Wing 

The Parowan Bonanza 



39 



Brandon, John G., 
Byrne, Donn, 
Cameron, Margaret, 
Cameron, Margaret, 
Canfield, Dorothy, 
Chambers, Robert W., 
Chisholm, A. M., 
Christie, Agatha. 
Cobb, Irving, 
Cole, G. and M., 
Colver, Alice Ross, 
Converse, Florence 
Croft, Freeman W., 
Cronyn, George W., 
Curwood, James 0., 
Delafield, E. M., 
Deland, Margaret, 
de la Roche, Mazo, 
Dell, Ethel M., 
Deeping, Warwick, 
Dunn ; J. Allen, 
Dunsany, Lord, 
"Elizabeth," 
Erskine, John, 
Erskine, Laurie Y., 
Ertz, Susan, 
Fairbank, Janet A., 
Ferber, Edna, 
Ferber, Edna, 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Ford, Sewell, 
Freeman, R. Austin, 
Freeman, R. Austin, 
Gale, Zona, 
Galsworthy, John, 
Glasgow, Ellen, 
Glasgow, Ellen, 



Young Love 

Hangman's House 

A Sporting Chance 

Johndover 

Her Son's Wife 

Cardigan 

The Land of Big Rivers 

The Man in the Brown Suit 

Those Times and These 

Death of a Millionaire 

The Dear Pretender 

Into the Void 

Inspector French's Greatest Case 

'49 A Novel of Gold 

The Black Hunter 

The Chip and the Block 

The Kays 

Delight 

A Man Lmder Authority 

Sorrell and Son 

Rimrock Trail 

The Charwoman's Shadow 

Introduction to Sally 

Private Life of Helen of Troy 

The Laughing Rider 

Afternoon 

The Smiths 

Dawn O'Hara 

The Show Boat 

The Heaven Kissed Hill 

Marchester Royal (presented) 

The Secret Way 

The Valley of Headstrong Men 

Meet 'em with Shorty McCabe 

The Shadow of the Wolf 

The Mystery of Angelina Frood 

Preface to a Life 

The Silver Spoon 

Barren Ground (presented) 

The Romantic Comedians 

40 



Gregory, Jackson, 
Gregory, Jackson, 
Grey, Zane, 
Grierson, Francis, 
Harris, Corra, 
Hendryx, James B., 
Hendryx, James B., 
Heywood, DuBose, 
Hough, Clara S., 
Hough, Emerson, 
Howarth, David, 
Hyatt, Stanley P., 
Jackson, Margaret, 
Jepson, Edgar, 
Johnston, Mary, 
Johnston, Mary, 
Jordan, Elizabeth, 
Kingsley, Florence, 
Knipe, E. B. and A. A., 
Kyne, Peter B., 
Lincoln, Joseph C, 
Loring, Emilie, 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill, 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill, 
Macnamara, Rachel S., 
McCutcheon, George B., 
McCutcheon George B., 
McCutcheon, George B., 
Major, Charles, 
Marhall, Archibald, 
Marshall, Edison, 
Marsh, George, 
Marsh, George, 
Melville, Herman, 
Miln, Louise J., 
Miln, Louise J., 
Miln, Louise J., 
Montgomery, L. M., 
Mulford, Clarence, 
Nicholson, Meredith, 



The Desert Thoroughbred 
Timber Wolf 
The Vanishing American 
The Limping Man 
Flapper Anne 
The Gold Girl 
The Prairie Flower 
Angel 
Leif the Lucky 
Mother of Gold 
The Valley of Gold 
The Markham Affair 
Elizabeth Tower 
The Buried Rubies 
The Great Valley 
The Slave Ship 
The Lady of Pentlands 
Resurrection of Miss Cynthia 
The Shadow Captain 
The Understanding Heart 
The Great Mogul 
Here Comes the Sun 
Lo Michael 
Coming Through the Rye 
Golden Dishes 
Black is White 
Brewster's Millions 
Kindling and Ashes 
Yolanda 
Mote House Mystery 
Child of the Wild 
Men Marooned 
The Valley of Voices 
Moby Dick 
In a Shantung Garden 
It Happened in Peking 
Ruben and Ivy Sen 
The Blue Castle 
Rustler's Valley 
The Hope of Happiness 



41 



Norris, Kathleen, 
Oember, Marie C, 
Ogden, George W., 
Ogden, George W., 
Cppenheim, E. P., 
Ostrander, Isabel, 
Packard, Frank L., 
Phillips, Gordon, 
Pedler, Margaret, 
Porter, Eleanor, 
Rath, E. J., 
Rath, E. J., 

Raine, William McLeod, 
Raine, William McLeod, 
Raine, William McLeod, 
Raine, William McLeod, 
Raine, William McLeod, 
Reed, Myrtle, 
Reeve, Arthur B., 
Rhodes, Eugene M., 
Richmond, Grace, 
Rickard, Mrs. Victor, 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts, 
Robertson, Frank C., 
Rowland, Henry C., 
Royde, Smith, 
Ruck, Berta, 
Ruck, Berta, 
Ruck, Berta, 
Sabatini, Rafael, 
Sabatini, Rafael, 
Sabatini, Rafael, 
Sanders, Charles W., 
Scoggins, C E., 
Singmaster, Elsie, 
Stackpoole, H. de Vere, 
Stribling, T. S., 
Stringer, Arthur, 
Thompson, Sylvia, 
Towne, Charles H., 



The Black Flemings 

Shepherds 

The Cow Jerry 

The Trail Rider 

Prodigals of Monte Carlo 

Annihilation 

Running Special 

High Explosives 

Tomorrow's Tangle 

Hustler Joe 

Gas, Drive In 

Elope If You Must 

Troubled W ; aters 

The Desert's Price 

A Man Four Square 

Crooked Trails and Straight 

Mavericks 

Lavendar and Old Lace 

The Radio Detective 

Good Men and True 

Cherry Square 

L T pstairs 

Tish Plays the Game 

Foreman of the Forty-Bar 

Hirondelle 

Naomi-Tortoise Shell Cat (presented) 

In Another Girl's Shoes 

The Immortal Girl 

Sweet Stranger 

Bartely's, the Magnificent 

Fortune's Fool 

The Strolling Saint (presented) 

Trouble Range 

The Red God's Call 

Keller's Anna Ruth 

Golden Ballast 

Teeftallow 

Never Fail Blake 

The Hounds of Spring 

Tinsel 

42 



Turnbull, Margaret, 
Van V'orst, Marie, 
Waller, Mary E., 
Warner, Sylvia T., 
Wentworth, Patricia, 
White, Stewart Edward, 
Whitlock, Brand, 
Widdemer, Margaret, 
Williamson, C. N. and A. M., 
Williamson, C. N. and A. M., 
Wodehouse, P. G., 
Wren, P. C, 



The Left Lady 

Big Tremaine 

Deep in the Hearts of Men 

Lolly Willowes' (presented) 

The Black Cabinet 

Skookum Chuck 

Up rooted 

The Gallant Lady 

Winnie Childs 

Million Dollar Doll 

He Rather Enjoyed It 

Beau Geste 



Miscellaneous 
Hitting the Dark Trail 
Famous Indian Chiefs 
Story of David Livingstone 
The Book Nobody Knows 
The Man Nobody Knows 
The Arcturus Adventure, 
Maine Beautiful, 
The Venture Book, 
The Dreadful Decade, 
Our Times 
East of Siam, 
The Mauve Decade, 
Atolls of the Sun, 
Boys of '61, 
Hoyle's Games, 
Will Roger's Illiterate Digest 
Ivanhoe, 

Quentin Durward, 
East Wind, 
School and Home, 
For the Story Teller, 
Three Musketeers, 
Microbe Hunters, 
The Story of Philosophy, 
A Wayfarer in Egypt (presented), 
Louder Please (presented), 



Clarence Hawkes 

C. H. Johnson 

Vautier Golding 

Bruce Barton 

Bruce Barton 

William Beebe 

Wallace Nutting 

Elinor Mordaunt 

Don Seitz 

Mark Sullivan 

Harry A. Franck 

Thomas Beer 

Frederick O'Brien 

Charles Carleton Coffin 

R. H. Foster 

Sir W T alter Scott 

Sir Walter Scott 

Amy Lowell 

Angelo Patri 

Carolyn S. Bailey 

Alexandre Dumas 

Paul de Kruif 

Will Durant 

A. A. Quibell 

Earnest E. Calkins 



43 



Homeopathy in the World War (presented) 
Amereka nasa Vlast (presented) 
Religious Orders of Women (presented) 



F. M. Dearbon 

William J. Long 

Elinor Dehey 



Alcott, Louisa M., 
Alcott, Louisa M., 
Allen, Charles F., 
Abbott, Jane, 
Altsheler, Joseph A., 
Altsheler, Joseph A., 
Ashmun, Margaret, 
Bailey, Temple, 
Ballantyne, R. M., 
Baum, Frank L., 
Barbour, Ralph H., 
Barbour, Ralph H., 
Barbour, Ralph H., 
Beard, Dan, 
Bonsels, Waldemar, 
Brooks, Amy, 
Chapman, Allen, 
Colum, Padraic, 
Cooper, Courtney R., 
Curtis, Alice T., 
Curtis, Alice T., 
Dickens, Charles, 
Dowd, Emma C, 
Drummond, Henry, 
Forrester, Izola, 
Garis, Howard, 
Garis, Howard, 
Garis, Lilian, 
Gordy, Wilbur Fisk, 
Gordy Wilbur Fisk, 
Gregor, Elmer, 
Grey, Zane, 
Hale, Lucretia P., 
Hasbrouck, Louise, 
Hawkes, Clarence, 



Juvenile 

Eight Cousins 

Little Men 

David Crockett, Scout 

Highacres 

Last of the Chiefs 

Horsemen of the Plains 

School Keeps Today 

Judy 

The Coral Island 

The Wizard of Oz 

Full-back Foster 

Right-end Emerson 

Right-tackle Todd 

The Black Wolf Pack 

Adv. of Maya, the Bee 

What Rosalie Dare Won 

Ralph of the Round House 

The Children's Homer 

Lions, 'n' Tigers, 'n' Everything 

Little Maid of Bunker Hill 

Little Maid of Monmouth 

A Christmas Carol 

Polly of Lady Gay Cottage 

The Monkey That Would Not Kill 

Kit of Greenacre Farm 

Rick and Ruddy in Camp 

Rick and Ruddy out West 

Nancy Brandon, Idealist 

Stories of Early American History 

Stories of Later American History 

Spotted Deer 

Roping Lions in the Grand Canyon 

The Peterkin Papers 

The Boys' Parkman 

Jungle Joe 



44 



Hawkes, Clarence, 
Hawkes, Clarence, 
Hill, Charles, 
Hope, Laura Lee, 
Hope, Laura Lee, 
Jackson, Helen Hunt, 
Lawrence, Josephine, 
Lawience, Josephine, 
Lofting, Hugh, 
Masefield, John, 
Murphy, Marguerite, 
Norwood, Edwin P., 
Pendexter, Hugh, 
Porter, Eleanor, 
Poulsson, Emilie, 
Pyle, Katharine, 
Pyle, Katharine, 
Richards, Laura E., 
Riley, James Whitcomb, 
Robinson, Mabel, 
Rush, Charles, 
Ruskin, John, 
Scbohey and Home, 
Seaman, Augusta H., 
Seaman, Augusta H., 
Seaman, Augusta H., 
Sheppard, W. C, The 

Smith, Mary P. Wells, 
Smith, Harriet L., 
Stokes, Susan, 
Taggart, Marion, 
Thorndyke, Helen L., 
Tomlinson, Everett T., 
Verrill, A. Hyatt, 
Whitney and Perry, 
Wells, R. F., 
Aesop's Fables 
Ashton, Mina, 
Aspinwall, Alicia, 



Pep 

The White Czar 

Fighting A Fire 

Bobbsey Twins at Cloverbank 

Bobbsey Twins Camping Out 

Nelly's Silver Mine 

Adventures of Elizabeth Ann 

Elizabeth Ann at Maple Spring 

Doctor Dolittle's Circus 

Jim Davis 

Patricia from New York 

The Other Side of the Circus 

The Young Loggers 

Six Star Ranch 

What Happened to Inger Johanne 

Theodora 

Prose and Verse for Children 

Queen Hildegarde 

Child Rhymes 

Little Lucia's School 

Modern Aladdins and their Magic 

King of the Golden River 

Stories of Great Musicians 

Jacqueline of the Carrier Pigeons 

The Sapphire Signet 

The Secret of Tate's Beach 

Rambler Club on the Texas Border 

Young and Old Puiitans of Hatfield 

Peggy Raymond's School Days 

Ten Common Trees 

Nancy Porter's Opportunities 

Honey Bunch 

The Young Sharp-shooter 

Deep Sea Hunters 

Four American Indians 

On Land and Sea with Caesar 

Story Book Tales 
Short Stories for Short People 



45 



Bailey, Carolyn, 
Bailey, Carolyn,, 
Bailey, Carolyn, 
Bailey, Alice, 
Banta, N. M., . 
Balch, Anna, 
Bladwin, James, 
Baldwin, James, 
Baldwin, James, 
Beebe, Emma, 
Beebe, Katherine, 
Bigham, Madge, 
Bishop, Ruth, 
Breck, John, 
Breck, John, 
Burgess, Thornton W., 
Castella, Helen, 
Chance, Lulu, 
Day, S. P., 
Denton, Clara, 
Denton, Clara, 
Dunlop and Jones, 
Dutton, Maud, 
Dopp, Katherine, 
Eldridge, Emma, 
Eugene Field, 
Field, Eugene, 
Fox, Frances M., 
Fox, Frances M., 
Grimm's Fairy Tales 
Gordon, Elizabeth, 
Haaren, J. H., 
Hall, May E., 
Hardy, Marjorie, 
Heath, Janet, 
Heller, Mrs., 
Hilkene, Ruth, 
Hix, Melvin, 
Hix, Melvin, 
Homer, Sidney, 



Boys and Girls of Discovery Days 

Every Day Stories 

Hero Stories 

Katrina and Jan 

Brownies at Work and Play 

Good Times at Grandpa's 

Fifty Famous Stories 

Fairy Readers 

Four Great Americans 

The Picture Primer 

First Year Nature Reader 

Little Boy in a Big World 

The Mermaid's Message 

The Bad Little Cwls 

The Blue Jay Who Went Tame 

Happy Jack 

The Sandman Fairy Stories 

Little Folks in Many Lands 

Reynard the Fox 

Cozy Corner Tales 

Homespun Stories 

Playtime Stories 

Fishing and Hunting 

Early Cave Men 

Child Reader in Verse 

Reader 

With Trumpet and Drum 

Adventures of Sonny Bear 

Little Bear's Adventure 

Really so Stories 

Songs and Stories 

Jan and Betje 

Wag and Puff 

The Hygienic Pig 

Little Golden Hood 

Willie Fox's Diary 

Once Upon A Time Stories 

Two Little Run-A-Ways 

Songs from Mother Goose 

46 



Hunt, Clara, 
Jacobson, Viola, 
Jacobs, Joseph, 
Johnson, Mabel, 
Krout, Mary, 
Lansing, Marion 
Lansing, J. S., 
Lang, Andrew, 
Lippincott, J. W 
Lucia, Rose, 
McCullough, Annie, 
Martin, John, 
Miller, Olive B., 
Miller, Olive Thorne, 
Mitchell, Edith, 
Orton, Helen F., 
O'Shea, 

Parker, Horatio, 
Parker, Horatio, 
Peabody, S. C, 
Paine, Marion, 
Perkins, Lucy Fitch, 
Pumphrey, Margaret 
Richey, Emma, 
Schwartz, Julia, 
Schwatka, Frederick, 
Serl, Emma, 
Shaw, Edward, 
Shaw, Edward, 
Sheriff Abigail, 
Sewell, Anna, 
Silvester & Peters, 
Simms, Mae, 
Skinner, Ada M., 
Skinner, Ada M., 
Skinner, Ada M., 
Smith, Eleanor, 
Smith, Eleanor, 
Smith, Laura, 
Smith, Laura, 



About Harriet 

Fifty Famous Stories 

English Fairy Tales 

Dot and David 

Alice's Visit to Hawaiian Islands 

Fairy Tales, Books One and Two 

Child's Word Garden 

Blue Fairy Book 

Red Ben, the Fox 

American Discoverers fro Little Americans 

Little Stories for Little People 

Read to Me Again 

Sunny Rhymes for Happy Children 

True Bird Stories 

Betty and Bobby Bubbles 

Bobby of Cloverfield Farm 

Six Nursery Classics 

Primary Music 

Music Book One 

Step by Step Primer 

Barnard Language Reader 

Dutch Twins Primer 

Stories of the Pilgrims 

Stories of Animal Village 

Five Little Strangers 

Children of the Cold 

Johnny and Jenny Rabbit 

Big and Little People of Other Lands 

Discoverers and Explorers 

Stories Old and New 

Black Beauty 

Happy Hour Stories 

Child Literature 

Child's Book of Verse 

Merry Tales 

Nursery Tales from Many Lands 

Music Primer 

Music Reader, Book One 

Circus Cottontail 

Hans and Hilda in Holland 

47 



Smith, Laura, Little Bear 
Smith, Laura, Snubby Nose and Tippy Toes 

Smith, Laura, Three Little Cottontails 

Thompson, J. G., Fables and Rhymes 

Warner, Gertrude C, Star Stories 

Wells, 0. S., The Fairy Book 

Wyss, J. D., Swiss Family Robinson 

Readers 

Barnes Easy Primer 

Brooks First Reader 

Brown and Bailey Jingle Primer 

Coe's, Easy Steps in Reading 

Cyr's, New Primer 

Cyr's, Art Readers, First and Second 

Field, Martin, Primer 

Horace, Mann, . Primer, First, Second 

Magee, First, Second 
Story Hour Readers, First, Second 
Story Hour Primer 
Sunshine Primer 

Wade and Silvester, First, Second 

Young and Field, First, Second 

Magazines 

American Magazine Ladies' Home Journal 

Good Housekeeping Better Homes and Gardens 

Harper's Magazine Music and Youth 

National Geographic American Boy 

Popular Mechanics Boys' Life 

Review of Reviews Child Life 

World's Work St. Nicholas 
Science and Invention 

Trustees 

MARION C. BILLINGS Term expires, 1927 

MRS. MARGARET MULLANEY Term expires, 1928 

V. H. KELLER Term expires, 1929 



48 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1926 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patrick W. Mullins, Chairman Term expires, 1929 

Harry W. Marsh, Secretary Term expires, 1927 

Mrs. Cora King Graves Term expires, 1928 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 
177 Prospect Street, Northampton Telephone 2103-M 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield Schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hatfield Schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Chief Arthur R. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 

October 1, 1926 

Boys Girls Totals 

Between 5 and 7 71 63 134 

Between 7 and 14 270 268 538 

Between 14 and 16 48 39 87 

Totals, 1926 . . 389 370 759 



51 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 

First Winter Term — 7 Weeks < f •* y ' ' 

(Closes February 18, 1927 

c a w 4. t qw i /Opens February 28, 1927 

second Winter lerm- — o Weeks < * . „ __ irk I- 

(Closes April 22, 1927 

c . ■ ' rr 7W , /Opens May 2, 1927 

Spring Term-7 Weeks j^^ June ^ 1927 

Fall Term-16 Weeks (Opens September 6 1927 

(Closes December 23, 192/ 

First Winter Term Opens January 2, 1928 

No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following 
Monday is observed as a holiday. 

Legal holidays in Massachusetts include January first, 
February twenty-second, April nineteenth, May thirtieth, 
July Fourth, the first Monday in September, October twelfth, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



52 



Report of School Committee 



The total enrollment in town this year is 15 more than 
last year. The enrollment in the Academy in October was 20 
more than last year. In grades 4 to 8, there has been an in- 
crease of 18, making 38 more pupils in the upper grades than a 
year ago. These extra pupils are being cared for without increas- 
ing the corps of teachers. Of course, the service to individual 
pupils is reduced because of the larger number per teacher. 
The indications are that a very similar increase will occur in 
the Academy and upper grades next September. While it may 
be necessary to employ another teacher, an effort will be made 
to so organize the classes that this will not be demanded. If 
it is impossible to do this, more money will be required for a 
teacher and new equipment for an additional room at the 
Center. There will be about 16 more children at Bradstreet 
next September than at present. This will necessitate en- 
larging the present room by moving the partition or transferring 
the grammar grades to the west room. 

Based on the last statistical report of the State Board of 
Education, the total cost per pupil in Hatfield was $64. 80 
which is an increase over the previous year of $4.38. The 
state average for the group of similar towns was $84.68. This 
amount is $6.80 higher than the year before. There are several 
towns where the cost per pupil is nearly twice as much as here. 
By comparing the 1927 budget item by item with the expen- 
ditures for the year just closed, it will be easy to see that the 
increases are demanded by natural conditions and a steady 
increase of attendance in the upper grades. 

During the year, a new heating plant has been installed at 
Bradstreet, and such repairs, have been made as were absolutely 
necessary to protect school properties. The school buildings 
in the different sections are in good condition. 

We feel that the town has a very capable corps of teachers 
and that the standard of work which is being maintained is high 

53 



considering the overcrowded conditions under which it is being 
achieved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PATRICK W. MULLINS, 
HARRY W. MARSH, 
CORA KING GRAVES. 



Financial Statement 

December 31, 1926 

RESOURCES 

Town Appropriation 251,100.00 

Smith-Hughes Fund 350.05 

- 251,450.05 

EXPENDITURES 

School Committee 2138.00 

Supt. of Schools and Attendance Officer 2,377.56 
Supervisors of Music, Drawing, Penman- 
ship and Health Education 2,733.52 

Teachers— Academy 10,978.78 

Teachers — Elementary 21,180.50 

Books and Supplies 2,997.85 

Janitors and Supplies 3,212.95 

Fuel ■ 4,546.25 

Repairs 787.81 , 

New Equipment 816.28 

Miscellaneous 636.05 

Transportation- — Academy 890.00 

Transportation- — Elementary 148.00 

251,443.35 

26.70 

54 



ESTIMATED FINANCIAL BUDGET FOR 1927 

School Committee 3200.00 

Superintendent of Schools and Atten- 
dance Officer 2,500.00 

Supervisors of Music, Drawing, Penman- 
ship and Health Education 2,800.00 

Teachers— Academy 11,400.00 

Teachers — Elementary 21,400.00 

Janitors and Supplies . 3,250.00 

Fuel 4,500.00 

Repairs 1,500.00 

Books and Supplies 3,500.00 

Transportation- — Academy 1,140.00 

Transportation — Elementary 900.00 

Miscellaneous 600.00 

- ?53,690.00 

Smith Hughes Fund 290.00 



Total Budget for 1927. . . 353,400.00 

From this amount is deducted State Reimbursements, 
Tuition, and Funds from Smith Academy Trustees. The 
balance is raised by the Town. 



55 



Totals 


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Harry E. Rollins 
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Mary E. Ryan 
Maxine E. Blanchard 
Clarence J. Larkin 
Mrs. Mary B. Powers 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Sarah V. Kiley 
Mrs. Grace W. Bardwell 
Theresa C. Mondrat 
Margaret O'Donnell 
Mrs. Constance Mullany 
Mary E. Fenton 
Hilda V. Corman 
Mrs. .Lena P. Fitzgerald 
Margaret M. Nolan 
Eleanor B. Whalen 
Harold L. Ford 
Margaret B. Schmitter 
Mary C. Kelly 
Mrs. Mary D. Donelson 
Mrs. Catherine B. Harris 
Ellen O'Hara 
Kathleen Connelly 
Maude E. Boyle 
Mrs. Bernice B. Ormond 
Marian Holmes 


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56 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 

Income Expense Balance 

Fund, 1926 1926 1926 

Hannah \Y. Smith £13.56 £10.00 £49.94 

Augusta Wells 16.16 10.00 361.80 

Oliver Warner 2.32 2.00 51.84 

John H. Sanderson 4.74 4.00 106.57 

Luman M. Moore 10.14 8.00 226.54 

P. M. Wells 5.83 10.00 123.46 

Benjamin Waite 5.54 2.00 79.66 

Abby Dickinson 4.41 3.50 97.99 

Silas G. Hubbard 10.78 4.00 243.97 

Levi Graves 6.89 4.00 154.83 

Lucy L. Morton 12.64 4.00 288.34 

Charles Smith 4.94 4.00 1 10.47 

Lemuel B. Field 4.93 4.00 109.90 

Charlotte G. Wilkie 53.75 1,235.49 

Rufus H. Cowles 5.00 4.00 111.47 

Charles E. Hubbard 5.22 4.00 116.30 

Alpheus Cowles 4.84 4.00 107.75 

James Porter 4.73 4.00 104.73 

Daniel W. Allis 7. 57 5.00 168.90 

J. H. Howard 4.71 4.00 104.46 

Fannie M. Burke 4.77 4.00 105.78 

Charles S. Shattuck 4.75 4.00 105.61 

Seth W. Kingsley 4.71 4.C0 104.64 

E.S.Warner 9.47 7.00 211.39 

Reuben Belden 4.97 1 14.74 

Theodore Porter 4.79 4.00 102.08 

Charles L. Graves 4.54 4.00 102.23 

Roswell Hubbard 4.54 4.00 101.69 

Cooley D. Dickinson 5.74 5.00 127.22 

Eliiah Bardwell 14.70 4.00 334.12 

Joseph D. Billings 4.55 4.00 101.25 

Memorial Town Hall, Int 144.02 3,693.21 

Edward C. Billings 27.40 20.00 567.40 

Augusta Beals 4.64 4.00 103.01 

Anthony Douglas New Account 50.U0 

Received : 

Perpetual Care Funds ?162.50 

Paid out care of lots 162.50 



V. H. KELLER, 



57 



Treasurer. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 

of the 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

for the 

Year Ending December 31, 1927 




Anker Printing Company 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 

For Town Meeting, February 6, 1928 : 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Hatfield in said County, Greetings: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and town affairs 
to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 6th 
day of February, next at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles, to wit: — 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: Town Clerk, Three Selectmen, One Assessor for 
3 years and One Assessor for one year. One Water Commissioner 
for 3 years, Town Treasurer, one member of the School Com- 
mittee for 3 years, One Trustee of the Public Library for 3 
years, Auditor, Tree Warden, Collector under the Will of 
Oliver Smith, Tax Collector, Farm Bureau Director, Six Con- 
stables. All of the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon and be 
kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time as the 
majority of the voters present shall direct but in no case will 
they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the evening: 

Article 3. To hear the report of the various town officers. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to the payment of 
School House Note No. 28 and interest $2,495.00 

Article 6. To take action in relation to the maintenance 
of ordinary repairs on highways, bridges, sewers and sidewalks 
and raise and appropriate money for the same. 
Amount recommended - #12,000.00 

3 



Article 7. To take action in relation to raising and ap- 
propriating money to pay bonds of town officers. 
Amount recommended $2 10.00 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to defray expense of Memorial Hall for the ensuing 
year. Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Tree Warden and Moth Work. 

Amount recommended for Tree Warden $600.00 

Amount recommended for Moth Work 150.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the inspection of barns, animals and slaughtering. 
Amount recommended $300.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the maintenance of the Fire Department. 
Amount recommended $900.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Insurance. Amount recommended $1,000.00 

Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Contingencies. Amount recommended. . . .$1,000.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for care of the poor for the ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $3,500.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of Interest. 
Amount recommended $3,000.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of salaries of town officers for the en- 
suing year. Amount recommended .....' $3,500.00 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the maintenance of the schools for the 
ensuing year. Amount recommended $52,900.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more school physicians. 
Amount recommended . .$200.00 

4 



Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of the cemeteries. 
Amount recommended $100.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. Amount recommended $125.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library. Amount recommended. .$850.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of tuition of Hatfield students 
attending Smith Agricultural School. 
Amount recommended $840.00 

Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County 
Aid to Agriculture per Chap. 273, Acts 1918. 
Amount recommended $150.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for street lights. Amount recommended $4,400.00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Police Protection for the ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $2,800.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for road on Chestnut Street, commencing at pres- 
ent State Highway easterly as far as appropriation will go. 
Same to be used with money from outside resources. 
Amount recommended .$3,000.00 

Total Appropriation Recommended $94,220.00 

In addition to the above recommended articles, there is to 
be assessed in the taxes for the year 1928, the amount raised 
at the Special Town Meeting held October 3rd, 1927, for Snow 
Removal Equipment, amount raised and appropriated $5,000.00. 
Amount raised and appropriated for Flood Damage at Special 
Town Meeting held November 22, 1927, $10,000.00. Total 
additional assessment $15,000.00. 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
ROBERT L. BELDEN, 
PATRICK W. MULLINS, 

Finance Committee. 

5 



Article 27. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in; anticipation of the revenue for the current financial year. 

Article 28. To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to choose its 
Selectmen for term of three years. Beginning with annual 
Town Meeting of 1929. One member of the Board of Selectmen 
to be elected for three years, one member for two years, and one 
member for one year, and one elected each year thereafter. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting up attested copies thereof in five public places in said 
town, seven days at least before time for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this the 26th day of January in the 
year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred twenty eight. 

ROBERT J. McGRATH, 2nd, 
EDSON W. STRONG, 
WILLIAM L. BELDEN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Selectmen's Report 

To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

In accordance with the requirements of. the Statutes of 
Massachusetts, the following report for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1927, is respectfully submitted: 



M. 

M. 
M. 



SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS 

Appropriation 33,300.00 

H. Dwight, three-quarters Salary 1926 Col $375.00 

H. Dwight, one-quarter salary 1927 Col 125.00 

H. Dwight, Assessor 1927 398.00 

V. H. Keller, Salary Town Clerk and Clerk of Board 

of Selectmen 1,200.00 

V. H. Keller, Assessor 72.00 

E. A. Breor, Assessor 72.00 

Chas. W. Wade, Sealer 150.00 

John McHugh, Elector 10.00 

E. W. Strong, Chairman Board of Selectmen 150.00 

R. J. McGrath, 2nd Selectmen 75.00 

W. H. Riley, Selectman. 75.00 

C. E. Warner, Auditor 10.00 

T. W. Ryan, Registrar .... . 5.00 

L. A. Billings, Registrar 5.00 

Chas. Flynn, Registrar 5.00 

V. H. Keller, Registrar 5.00 

Marion C. Billings, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

Margaret P. Ryan, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

J. R. McGrath, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

Jos. Godin, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

D. J. Ryan, Ballot Clerk 5.00 

E. L. Graves, Ballot Clerk '. . . . 5.00 

Unexpended Balance 538.00 



33, 300.00 

SCHOOL HOUSE NOTE NO. 27 

Appropriation 32,585.00 

Note No. 27 and Interest 32,585.00 

7 



BONDS OF TOWN OFFICERS 

Appropriation #150.00 

Boyle & McGlynn £148.00 

Unexpended Balance 2.00 

2150.00 
SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Appropriation #200.00 

Dr. A. J. Bonneville #100.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne 100.00 

#200.00 
COUNTY AID TO AGRICULTURE 

Appropriation #150.00 

Warren M. King, Treasurer #150.00 

STREET LIGHTS 

Appropriation #4,350.00 

Amherst Gas Co #4,350.00 

OLD BILL 

Appropriation #1,430.08 

Over Draft on North Hatfield School Job #1,430.08 

NEW TRUCK FOR TOWN 

Appropriation #1,800.00 

F. S. Parson's Old Truck and #1,800.00 

WESTFIELD STATE SANITORIUM 

To Cash Paid for Hatfield Patient #135.00 

By Cash from Hatfield Patient 135.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation #1,000.00 

Hatfield Garage, Storage of Truck #120.00 

Hatfield Garage, Supplies, Gas and Oil 234.42 

P. E. Balise, Chief, Salary 150.00 

Larkin Mfg. Co., Supplies 1.35 

Porter McLeod Co., Repairs 1.25 

H.J. Boyer 11.00 

Chilson's Auto Top Shop 7.00 

Foster-Farrer 9.38 

Shumway & Riley . 8.10 

8 



A. Smith Fire Calls 311.00 

J. Small 16.00 

C. Winters 13.00 

T. Wickles 7.00 

A. Balise 16.00 

J. Wentzel : 5.00 

H. Pellam 13.00 

M. B.Ryan 2.00 

J. Parada 8.00 

Sid Carl 17.00 

F. McGrath 2.00 

Jo Smith 2.00 

H.Harris 3.00 

S. Harris 3.00 

P. Harris 3.00 

C. Holt 1.50 

A. B. Wolfram 1.50 

A. Breor 1.50 

H. W. Marsh 17.00 

J. Boyle 2.00 

J. Slussars, Supplies 18.50 

J. A. Sullivan 6.40 

J. L. Day, Storage 15.00 

C. H. Crafts 15.00 

J. J. Betsold 15.00 

W. E. Boyle 18.75 

Lavetire Bros., Supplies 9.20 

L. Harris 2.00 

J. Raffa.: 2.00 

J. Ondras 2.00 

3790.85 

Unexpended Balance 209.15 

31,000.00 
INTEREST 

Appropriation 33,500.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Int. on Notes 33,063.76 

Unexpended Balance 446.24 

33,500.00 
9 



NEW FIRE EQUIPMENT 

Appropriation ? 1,000.00 

Ford Chassis £375.00 

Lavitre Bros., Truck Body 321.00 

W. L. Graves, Copper Tank 60.00 

Chemical Tank *. 100.00 

Pioneer Rubber Mais, Hose 44.00 

American LaFrance Co., Supplies 26.30 

Woodhouse Mfg. Co : 41.10 

Valve, Brass Pipe, Fender Iron 14.10 

Hatfield Garage, Labor 15.00 

Chilson's Auto Top Shop 3.50 



31,000.00 

INSURANCE 

Appropriation #810.00 

Howard & Woodward 3671.15 

Boyle & McGlynn 7.85 

Unexpended Balance 130.97 



3810.00 



MEMORIAL HALL 

Appropriation 3200.00 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Coal 354.67 

A. Wicklas, Mowing Lawn 10.00 

F. G. Howard, Supplies .75 

V. H. Keller, Janitor 75.00 

Unexpended Balance 59.58 



3200.00 



MEMORIAL DAY 

Appropriation 3125.00 

F. T. Woodward, Band 381.00 

J. C. Wightman 10.00 

S. W. Kingsley 12.00 

F. G. Howard, Flags 22.00 



3125.00 



10 



INSPECTION OF BARNS AND SLAUGHTERING 

Appropriation 3300.00 

F. T. Bardwell $300.00 

CEMETERIES 

Appropriation $100.00 

Henry Pellam 240.00 

Eugene S. Strong 10.00 

Unexpended Balance 50.00 

LIBRARY $100.00 

Appropriation $850.00 

Ellen A. Waite, Salary and Extra Work $267.74 

Margaret Whalen, Assistant Librarian 72.60 

Mrs. Kacinski, Branch Librarian, Bradstreet 6.00 

Carrie C. Cutter, Branch Librarian 6.00 

Carrie C. Cutter, Magazines 39.25 

Amherst Gas Co., Lights 19.70 

American Book Co., Books 15.17 

Library Book House, Books 45.45 

Doubleday & Paige, Books 6.00 

Sherwood, Books 312.12 

A. Whitman & Co., Books 13.24 

Ginn & Co., Books 11.00 

Gaylord Bros., Supplies 13.90 

Library Bureau, Supplies n . 3.25 

Unexpended Balance 18.58 

MOTH WORK $850.00 

Appropriation $100.00 

M. B. Ryan, Labor $17.50 

P. Zima, Labor 10.50 

J. L. McGrath, Labor 6.50 

J. Ondras, Labor 3.50 

C. Ziexulewicz 3.50 

J. Giawaski 3.50 

Fitzhenry & Guptil, Supplies 1.76 

S. S. Dwight, Express .73 

Unexpended Balance 52.51 

$100.00 
11 



TREE WARDEN 

Appropriation 3650.00 

J. J. Stenglein 7.50 

3657.50 

Jas. L. McGrath, Supt 3104.70 

J. Ondras, Labor 57.75 

C. Ziexulewicz, Labor 50.75 

J. Gieski, Labor 50.05 

F. Malinoski, Labor 49.00 

J. Brennan, Labor 24.50 

Jo Parent, Labor 14.00 

F. Gieski, Labor 3.00 

F. McGrath, Labor 3.50 

N. Rogaleski, Labor .75 

Lavetrie Bros., Filing Saws 1.40 

Chas. Eberlein, Blacksmith Work 11.40 

Foster-Farrar Co., Ladder 23.00 

Unexpended Balance 163.70 

3657.50 
HATFIELD STUDENTS AT SMITH'S SCHOOL 

Appropriation 3550.00 

Tuition to July 1st, 1927 3536.25 

Unexpended Balance 13.75 



3550.00 

STUDENTS ATTENDING FALL TERM, 1927 

George Omasta Harry Strong 

Frank Novak Frank Wesolowski 

Michael Filipek 

TOWN POOR 

Appropriation 34,000.00 

City of Northampton 96.00 

A. R. Breor, Refund Exp., a-c 18.86 

34,114.86 

City of Holyoke 3962.82 

City of Northampton 563.30 

12 



Mothers Aid, Town §936.00 

Hampshire County Sanatorium 192.00 

Cooley Dickinson Hospital 147.00 

Overland Garage, Ambulance 5.00 

Massachusetts Hospital School 234.86 

W. H. Dickinson, Rent 30.00 

A. R. Breor, Express account 75.00 

Dr. A. J. Bonneville 12.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne 2.00 

S. Michalowski, Milk 2.00 

Ryan's Store, Groceries 4.00 

M. Klocko, Groceries 3.92 

Unexpended Balance 944.96 



HH4.86 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation £2,800.00 

A. R. Breor, Chief, Salary £2,000.00 

Chase Motor Co., Exchange 202.50 

Chase Motor Co., Repairs 10.10 

Hatfield Garage, Repairs, Gas and Oil 338.75 

Chilson's Auto Top Shop, Repairs 24.17 

Boyle & McGlynn, Insurance 21.25 

Whitcombs Cash Grocery, Telephone, Gas and Oil. 20.77 

Registrar Motor Vehicles 10.00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel 38.23 

Proulx & Fitzgerald, Repairs, Gas and Oil 39.15 

Herald Job Print, Letter Pleads * 15.00 

J. W. HefTernan, Desk File 3.50 

Hammond & Hammond, Legal Service 15.00 

Geo. Newman, Police Duty 17.00 

Jas. L. McGrath 13.00 

Geo. M. Deinlein 5.00 

J. C. H. Richards 5.00 

M. Klocko, Gas 3.15 

Herman Harris, Police Duty 10.00 

Unexpended Balance 8.43 

£2,800.00 
13 



KING STREET SEWER 

Appropriation 31,200.00 

^Portland Stoneware Co., Tile 3275.71 

J. Wentzel, Supt 62.50 

J. T. Powers 31.50 

T. Marcenowski 19.85 

P. Zima 33.85 

J. Wendolowski 26.00 

Stan Meleski 22.35 

Jo Majesky 10.10 

C. Riniak 13.35 

S. Laskey 27-.75 

S. Vishaway 29.35 

Wm. Kingsley 45.95 

Geo. Boyle 30.95 

P. Guerin 11.70 

Wm. Guerin 16.50 

P. Zagrodnik 23.95 

L. Maszur kwicz 4.70 

G. Eberlein 4.00 

A. H. Beers v. 13.50 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement 24.80 

Northampton Iron Works, Catch Basins. 42.80 

W. H. Riley & Co., Tile 126.69 

Webster Box Co., Lumber 7.76 

Unexpended Balance 294.39 

31,200.00 
SOUTH STREET SEWER 

Appropriation 3500.00 

Portland Stoneware Co., Tile 3140.78 

Northampton Iron Works, Catch Basins 32.10 

W. H. Riley & Co., Tile 8.55 

Webster Box Co., Lumber 3.88 

A. H. Beers, Suivey 6.50 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement 22.40 

G. Eberlein 2.80 

J. Wentzel, Supt 27.50 

A. Volpuk 12.25 

J. T. Powers 5.25 

14 



T. Marcenowski £17.00 

P. Zima 20.50 

•J. Wendolowski 17.50 

S. Meleski 17.50 

Jo. Majesky 17.50 

C. Riniak 14.25 

S. Vishaway 12.25 

Wm. Kingsley 12.40 

S. Zaskey 12.25 

J. Jandzinski 7.85 

Unexpended Balance 88.09 

CONTINGENT ?500.00 

Appropriation $1, 000.00 

K. H. Stone, County Treasurer. . . . 10.00 

Bounty Rebate. 

31,010.00 

Anker Printing Co., Town Reports 3114.00 

Metcalf Printing Co., Ballots 29.50 

A. E. Martell Co., Office Supplies 9.60 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., Office Phone 45.98 

Anker Printing Co., Tax Bills 15.50 

Mrs. Dhey, Postage and Envelopes 49.99 

City of Northampton, Old Bill 30.00 

Herrick Foote Co., Dog Tags 5.92 

P. B. Murphy, Office Supplies 3.75 

Dept. Corporations, Approving Notes 14.00 

Henry Pellam, Care Town Clock 25.00 

Henry Pellam, Janitor Town Hall, etc 32.00 

Registrar Motor Vehicles, Truck 2.00 

Amherst Gas Co., Town Hall Lights 27.47 

Jas. L. McGrath, Police Town Hall Dances 14.50 

Assessors Auto Tax List 5.00 

Hobbs & Warren, Assessors Supplies 16.52 

M. H. Dwight, Postage on Tax Bills. 11.50 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, Birth Returns. 2.25 

Dr. J. A. Bonneville, Birth Returns 7.25 

C. H. Chase, Deed Reports ." 12.40- 

Devol Printing Co., Office Supplies 4.50 

Estate, L. H. Kingsley, Rent Public Dump, 3 yrs... 15.00 

Commissioner of Public Safety Inspection 5.60 

15 



A. P. Wood, Repairing Town Clock £50.00 

Chas. N. Smart, Office Supplies 6.00 

R. H. Smith Mfg. Co., Office Supplies 3.55. 

Count): Commissioners, Fees 3.00 

F. G. Howard, Supplies 2.90 

Hampshire County Jail, Repairing Chairs 22.50 

Estate, J. A. Strong, Wood for Town Hall 52.00 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Inc., Advertising 1.52 

Northampton Com. College, Supplies 1.50 

Frank Betsold, Bounty on Lynx 10.00 

Fred T. Bardwell, Forest Fire 8.50 

C. W. Wade, Sealer Expense 18.85 

E. L. Graves, Repair on Town Hall 62.62 

J. Wentzel, Drowning Case 3.00 

A. Smith, Drowning Case 2.50 

F. Wesolowski, Drowning Case 4.50 

Francis McGrath, Drowning Case 4.50 

A. Balise, Drowning Case 2.00 

P. Lavitre, Drowning Case 2.50 

F. Dugal, Drowning Case 4.50 

M. Gogle, Drowning Case 5.00 

J. Small, Drowning Case 2.00 

L. Xewman, Drowning Case 2.00 

M. Riezuwicz, Drowning Case 2.00 

J. Kobosiak. Drowning Case 3.00 

A. Yarrows, Drowning Case 5.00 

G. M. Ballentine, Old Bill 10.00 

Herman Harris, Forest Fire 9.00 

Unexpended Balance 207.06 



31,010.00 

ORDINARY REPAIRS ON HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES 
AND SIDEWALKS 

Appropriation 310,000.00 

From St. Joseph's Parish , 24.00 

From Mrs. M. Proulx, Labor 6.40 

From Mrs. H. McLeod, Labor 5.55 

From N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 70.60 

From D. P. Sheehan. Stone 16.63 

310,123.18 

16 



M. B. Ryan, Supt 2488.75 

J. M. Wentzel, Supt 879.50 

J. T. Powers 490.35 

P. Zima. 509.45 

J. Howard 292.25 

L. Newman 19.25 

T. Marcenowski 398.32 

J. L. Stenglein..-. 8.00 

J. Gocloski 5.25 

R. J, McGrath 5.00 

Jas McGrath 10.50 

N. Wrathall 18.95 

J. Ondras 29.75 

G.Howard 3.50 

L. Karpinski 3.50 

S. Vishaway 17.50 

S. Meleski 3.50 

Ralph Boyle 3.50 

Wm. Kingsley 98.00 

L. Wentzel 7.00 

J. Jandzinski 31.75 

P. Brennan 10.C0 

J. Kubosiak 3.50 

C. Doluncz 3.50 

J. King, Filing Saws 4.75 

H. W. Carl, Team 23.50 

j. Vollinger 16.00 

M. H. Dwight 8.00 

F. T. Bardwell 44.00 

Wm. Cutter 44.00 

C. H. Crafts 24.00 

C. Morrell, Roller Driver 94.50 

Estate, A. L. Strong, Gravel 97.80 

E. L. Graves, Repairs Water Tanks, etc : 30.60 

G. Eberlein, Repairs 1.65 

Chas. Eberlein, Repairs 40.50 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co 93.79 

Barrett Co., Tar Material 439.60 

Barber Asphalt Co., ' 183.42 

Tar Products Co 83.60 

17 



Mace Moulton Co., Oiling Roads ?973.88 

J. S. Lane Co., Inc., Stone 541.06 

Gleason Bros., Inc., Drawing Stone 127.36 

O. E. Belden & Sons, Plank 425.00 

M. C. Bailey Co., Inc., Lumber 153.45 

Bisbee Bros., Plank 90.00 

Win. Ewing, Plank '. 216.00 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., Cement and Coal 31.70 

Kimball & Carey, Coal 31.20 

Foster, Farrer, Supplies t . 13.63 

J. Russell Co., Supplies 29.14 

J. A. Sullivan Co., Supplies 8.60 

Ryan's Store, Supplies 78.17 

Estate, M. J. Ryan, Supplies 8.25 

B. &. A. R.R., Freight 89.13 

Amherst Gas Co., Underpass Lights 13.86 

E. N. Dickinson, Gravel 93.40 

S. W. Kingsley, Sand ' 22.50 

S. S. Dwight, Express 8.92 

Lavetrie Bros., Filing Saws 1.90 

P. F. O'Leary, Bridge Signs 27.00 

K. B. Noble Co., Shovels 11.45 

Esco Mfg. Co., Highway Signs 60.02 

F. S. Parson, Repairs Reo 10.02 

Registrar Motor Vehicles, Trucks 4.00 

LaFluer Bros., Glass 2.25 

Mrs. L. H. Kingsley, Sand 17.40 

G. Cruckshank, Repairs 1.00 

Jas. Kelly, Mowing Bridge Street Common. 25.00 

A. Wicklas, Mowing Main Street Common 40.00 

Bancroft Press, Time Sheets 6.50 

F. G. Howard, Supplies 18.48 

F. E. O'Brien, Vulcanizing Tire 5.00 

O. H. Whitcomb, Supplies, Gas and Oil 8.45 

Proulx & Fitzgerald, Repairs, Gas and Oil 60.62 

Hatfield Garage, Repairs, Gas and Oil. 485.55 

H. Wolfram, Trucking 377.76 

COST OF SNOW REMOVAL 

H. W. Carl, Team 98.00 

G. Zagrodnik, Team 47.50 

18 



J. L. Stenglein, Team $11.50 

G. W. Stenglein ......' 975 

L. A. Deinlein ■ 3.50 

J. F. Betsold 5.25 

C.H. Crafts 35.49 

Hatfield Garage, Labor, Repairs, Gas, Oil, Storage, 
Two Trips to Boston to get and return State 

Truck 537.67 



Total Cost of Snow Removal $748.66 



Total Cost of Highways for Year $9,436.59 

Unexpended Balance 686.59 



$10,123.18 
FLOOD DAMAGE 

Thomas W. Kiley, Repair Work on Bridge Rd. Sewer $1,023.00 

John Wentzel, Supt., and bags 184.20 

J. T. Powers, Labor 105.00 

T. Marcensowski, Labor 99.75 

P. Zima, Labor 108.50 

Wm. Kingsley, Labor 87.50 

L. Newman, Labor 71.75 

Jo Majesky, Labor: 16.45 

S. Meleski, Labor 7.70 

P. Brennan, Labor 7.85 

Chas. Hafey, Truck 41.20 

G. R. Billings, Truck 29.60 

Geo. Zagrodnik, Truck and Team 211.25 

N. Staszko, Truck and Team 12.00 

H. W. Carl, Truck ' 91.50 

S. F. Billings, Truck 23.00 

Jo Gocloski, Truck 45.00 

F. T. Bardwell, Team 44.00 

C. H. Crafts, Team 20.00 

Scott Harris, Team 32.00 

E. A. Ryan, Team 60.00 

E. A. Ryan, Filling Material 87.95 

Belden Bros., Team 28.00 

J. Kozash, Team 32.00 

19 



Mrs. J. F. O'Dea, Team £40.00 

M. B. Graves, Team 63.00 

Sid Carl, Labor 15.25 

H. Pellam, Labor . 3.50 

G. Anable, Labor 14.00 

J. Kubosiak, Labor 7.00 

C. Dolencz, Labor 7.00 

J. L. McGrath, Labor 12.00 

M. H. Dwight, Labor 14.00 

M. Rogaleski, Labor 5.00 

J. Giawaski, Labor 5.00 

John Raffa, Labor 4.00 

A. B. Kent, Labor 5.00 

C. Ziezulewicz, Labor. 3.00 

G. Dick Kingsley, Labor 4.50 

F. McGrath, Labor 3.00 

Hatfield Garage, Labor 44.12 

N. Small, Labor 15.00 

A. Balise, Labor 4.00 

E. W. Strong, Labor 25.00 

P. T. Boyle, Team 15.00 

A. C. Bardwell, Filling Material 60.20 

A. H. Beers, Survey 15.00 

North Hatfield Grain Co., Cement 12.00 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Ins. Adv 5.20 

E. Jubenville, Bags 1.02 

W. H. Riley & Co., Tile 45.07 

32,916.06 

Received from Water Department §2,500.00 

Unexpended Balances Credited to this Account. . . . 5,774.55 
Balance on hand to apply on 1928 Flood Damage 

Account §5,358.49 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation §53,400.00 

Smith Hughes Fund 371.71 

§53,771.71 

Expenditures 
Academy Teachers 

F. M. Gifford §2,590.00 

20 



H. E. Rollins 31,840.00 

E. J. Burke 2,594.64 

Mae E. Toole 805.00 

Alice M. Brockway 520.00 

Mary E. Ryan 1,372.00 

Maxine E. Blanchard 1,294.50 

James J. Fitzgerald 132.00 

Elementary 

C. J. Larkin. 1,800.00 

Mrs. Mary B. Powers 258.00 

Margaret A. Ryan 980.00 

Sarah V. Kiley 997.50 

Mrs. Grace W. Bardwell 1,010.00 

Mrs. Constance Mullaney • 1,000.00 

Mary E. Fenton 992.50 

Margaret O'Donnell 980.00 

Catherine T. Shea 720.00 

Theresa Kondrat 90.00 

Hilda Corman 1,000.00 

Mrs. Lena P. Fitzgerald 995.00 

Anna O'Neill 360.00 

Lucelia Kelton 400.00 

Mrs. Catherine B. Harris 1,100.00 

Ellen O'Hara 931.00 

Kathleen Connelly 1,000.00 

Mrs. Mary Donellson 975.00 

Mary C. Kelly . 940.00 

H. L. Ford 1,137.25 

Margaret B. Schmitter 1,000.00 

Margaret M. Nolan 597.50 

Eleanor R. Whalen 995.00 

Supervisors 

Maud E. Boyle 925.00 

Mrs. Bernice B. Ormond 850.00 

Marian Holmes 999.96 

Substitute Teachers 

Mrs. Mary Bourdon 187.50 

Mrs. Marjorie Brooks 19.00 

Mrs. E. L. Graves 415.00 

Margaret P. Ryan 92.50 

21 



Marion Billings 3119.00 

Mrs. Margaret Mullaney 42.00 

Clara E. Dillon 10.00 

Anna Belden, Canning Class 100.00 

Superintendent 

O. A. Morton 1,700.00 

Office and Traveling Expenses 411.62 

Attendance Officer 

A. R. Breor 400.00 

Janitors 

Frank Brehm 1,975.75 

Geo. Dick Kingsley . 362.00 

Mrs. Holt 280.00 

L. Trecartin 312.00 

Mrs. Liebel 263.00 

Janitor Supplies 57.25 

Fuel 

North Hatfield Grain Co 1,853.52 

Webster Box Co 510.75 

Kimball & Carey 1,381.22 

J. J. Betsold, Wood 24.00 

A. Donis, Wood 84.00 

Standard Oil Co., Fuel Oil 19.28 

Transportation 

Boston & Main Transportation Co. . 1,047.00 

Northampton St. Ry. Co 514.80 

Miscellaneous 55.50 

Books and Supplies 3,583.26 

Miscellaneous 453.59 

School Committee, Salaries 235.00 

Census and Other Expenses 44.00 

Repairs 

W. P. Boyle 560.92 

W. H. Riley 133.14 

Shumway & Riley 29.25 

Merrick Lumber Co 82.79 

J. Chandler 127.81 

Jas. J. Hogan 63.00 

Miscellaneous 292.94 

Total Expenditures 352,011.16 

22 



Unexpended Balance 31,760.55 



$53,771.71 

Note: The Commonwealth returns to the town two- 
thirds of the salary of the instructors in the Agricultural and 
Household Arts Departments. 

RECAPITULATION, OF SELECTMEN'S ORDERS DRAWN 

AND PAID 

Bonds of Town Officers $148.00 

Contingent 802.94 

Cemeteries 50.00 

County Aid to Agriculture 150.00 

Fire Department •. . 790.85 

New Fire Equipment * 1,000.00 

Flood Damage 2,916.06 

Highways, Ordinary 9,436.59 

Inspection of Barns and Slaughtering 300.00 

Insurance 679.03 

Interest 3,053.76 

Library 831.42 

Moth Work 47.49 

Memorial Hall 140.42 

Memorial Day 125.00 

Poor 3,169.90 

Police 2,791.57 

King Street Sewer 905.61 

South Street Sewer 411.91 

Salaries of Town Officers 2,762.00 

Smith School 536.25 

School House Note No. 27 and Interest 2,585.00 

School Physicians , 200.00 

Street Lights 4,350.00 

North Hatfield School Overdraft 1,430.08 

Schools 52,011.16 

Tree Warden 393.80 

Town Truck 1,800.00 

Westfield Sanatorium 135.00 

393,953.84 
23 



Total Appropriations, Feb. 7, 1927 £96,050.08 

Receipts Credited to Town Account 3,262.25 

399,312.33 
Deducting Selectmens Orders Paid 93,953.84 

Leaves Net Balance of £5, 358.49 

To Apply on Flood Damage Account for 1928. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT J. McGRATH, 2nd, 
EDSON W. STRONG, 
WILLIAM L. BELDEN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



January 19, 1928. 

I have examined the books of the Selectmen and rmdthem 
correct. 

CHARLES W. WARNER, 

Auditor. 



24 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1928 

Clarence E. Belden 
Clifford L. Belden 
Frank J. Betsold 
Go. M. Deinlein 
John B. Bitner 
Roswell G. Billings 
Carleton H. Crafts 
Henry Charlebois 
John H. Day 
John L. Stenglein 
Joseph Dippolt 
George A. Deinlein 
Wm. F. Englehardt 
Ercent Godin 
Frederick Jubinville 
Walter H. Hadley 
Albert J. Labbee 
Herman Harris 
James L. McGrath 
Fred A. Pease 
Charles Pfieffer 
John T. Powers 
Daniel F. Riley 
Michael Saydlewski 
Charles Slattery 
John L. Sheehan 
Joseph T. Ryan 
George 0. Whitcomb 
Francis Levett 
Malcolm Crawford 
Henry Carl 
Murray B. Graves 
David Billings 
John C. Ryan 



25 



Treasurer's Report 



V. H. KELLER, Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield 

Dr. 
To Balance in Northampton National Bank, Jan- 
uary 1st, 1927 £9,422.65 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1925 Property Tax 18,187.56 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1925 Poll Tax 20.00 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1926 Poll Tax 110.00 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1926 Property Tax 31,060.88 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1927 Property Tax 43,249.70 

M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1927 Poll Tax 788.00 

K. H. Stone, County Treasurer, Dog Tax Refund. . 321.97 

K. H. Stone, County Treasurer, Wild Cat Bounty. 10.00 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Smith-Hughes Fund. 371.71 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Household Arts Dept. 850.90 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Agricultural Dept.. . . 1,765.49 
Treasurer of Commonwealth, One-half Tuition, 

Smith School, 1926 511.88 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Food account, Leeds 

Sanatorium 87.14 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Corporation Tax 2,962.85 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Income Tax 1925 .... 116.00 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Income Tax 1926. . . . 870.00 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Income Tax, 1927... . 14,931.31 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, National Bank Tax. . 182.64 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Trust Co. Tax 72.71 

Henry Pellam, Town Hall Rents 97.00 

John Kuriesiewicz, Westfleld Sanatorium account. . 135.00 

Smith Academy 508.90 

St. Joseph's Parish, Highway Dept 24.00 

City of Northampton, Tuition, Children in Hatfield 

School 317.07 

City of Northampton, Poor Account, Refund 96.00 

Howard & Woodward, Insurance Refund 93.77 

Northampton National Bank, Interest 192.08 

Northampton National Bank, Refund . 270.00 

Sealers Fees, C. W. Wade 96.51 

26 



Ellen A. Waite, Library Fines #10.76 

Court Fines, Police Dept 670.00 

License Fees 271.50 

M. J. Ryan, Treasurer, Sinking Fund 6,681.57 

L. A. Deinlein, Treasurer, Water Com 6,318.43 

A. R. Breor, Bridge Damage 50.00 

Paul Zima, Highway Dept 19.75 

Water Dept., Memo Account, Sale of Bonds 1,537.11 

Greer Bros., Bridge Damage 30.00 

Chas. Zawanski, Bridge Damage 10.00 

Fogart & Hendrickson, Bridge Damage 110.00 

M. Reziewicz, Fence Damage 20.00 

Main Street School, Sale, Car Tickets 27.27 

Main Street School, Telephone Tolls •. . . . 1.50 

Cash, Telephone Tolls .72 

Water Dept., Flood Damage account 2,500.00 

Kelliher Bros., Corp., Rent of Road Roller 390.00 

Gleason Bros., Rent of Road Roller 525.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H., R.R. Co., Highway Dept., 

Repair road and bridge at North Hatfield 105.60 

John Fortsch, Highway Dept 16.00 

Mrs. McLeod, Highway Dept 5.55 

Chas. PfifTer, Mty Bbls 3.00 

P. T. Boyle, Use Cement Mixed 25.00 

Fred Jubenville, Lumber 2.92 

J. J. Stenglein, Taking down tree 7.50 

Mike Janos, Use of Cement Mixer 10.00 

Hatfield Garage, Use of Cement Mixer 10.00 

D. P. Sheehan, L T se of Cement Mixer and Stone . . . 59.63 
C. H. Crafts, Set Wheels from Old Fire Wagon .... 15.00 

Poor Dept., Refund from Expense Account 18.86 

Lewis Murray, Sewer Entrance and Labor 36.68 

Joseph Gowash, Sewer Entrance . . . 33.00 

L. Kabot, Sewer Entrance 33.00 

S. Pelis, Sewer Entrance 33.00 

E. Kraulisz, Sewer Entrance and Labor 34.50 

F. Gogle, Sewer Entrance and Labor 34.50 

Mrs. M. J. Proulx, Sewer Entrance and Labor 39.40 

John Zapka, Sewer Entrance and Labor 34.08 

P. Zagrodnik, Sewer Entrance and Labor 35.83 

27 



H. E. Graves, Pumping Out Cellar $2. SO 

V. H. Keller, Pumping Out Cellar 2.50 

R. L. Belden, Pumping Out Cellar 5.00 

J. L. Day, Pumping Out Cellar 1.25 

Temporary Loans: 

Note No. 37, Dated March 28-27 15,000.00 

Note No. 41, Dated July 18-27 10,000.00 



8172,501.61 



Cr. 

By Selectmens Orders Paid 893,953.84 

Treasurers Orders Paid 382.90 

County Tax 11,396.56 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, State Tax 6,960.00 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, State Highways 708.00 

Treasuer of Commonwealth, Soldiers Exemption. . . 16.79 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Bank Tax 1.02 

Treasurer of Commonwealth, Auditing Town acct. . 1,289.02 
Northampton National Bank Balance of Water 

Bonds Outstanding 13,000.00 

Bills Payable: 

Note No. 33 10,000.00 

Note No. 34 15,000.00 

Note No. 38 ' 9.500.00 

Note No. 39, Part Payment 3,000.00 

Balance on Hand 7,293.48 

?172,501.61 



28 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Cr. 

By Cash on Hand £7,293.48 

Uncollected Taxes, 1924 422.42 

Uncollected Taxes 1925 469.34 

Uncollected Taxes 1926 14,921.40 

Uncollected Taxes 1927 _ 49,601.89 

Bills due town from State Smith School Account. . . 442.50 

Bills Due Town from State, Mothers Aid 312.00 

Bills Due Town, Gleason Bros 362.00 

Bill Due Town, Miscellaneous 82.06 



373,907.09 



Dr. 

Notes Outstanding: 

No. 40 £20,000.00 

No. 41 10,000.00 

No. 42 15,000.00 

No. 43.... 17,000.00 

Unpaid Bills, Smith School 281.25 

Tax Overlays, 1924, 1925 and 1926 6,363.51 

Balance in Favor of Town 5,262.33 

£73,907.33 

I have examined the Books and Accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending December 31st, 
1927 and find them correct. 

I find Selectmens and Treasurers orders, paid notes and 
receipts for one hundred sixty-five thousand two hundred eight 
(£165,208.13) dollars and thirteen cents with evidence of their 
having been paid, leaving balance on hand of £7,293.48. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

January 19, 1928. Auditor. 



29 



TAX COLLECTORS REPORT 
MYRON H. DWIGHT, Collector 

1924 PROPERTY TAX 

1924 

Uncollected Property Tax £422.42 



3422.42 



1925 POLL TAX 

To Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1926 3130.00 

By Cash Paid Treasurer 20.00 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 3110.00 

To Uncollected Prop Tax Dec. 31, 1926 318,546.90 
To Interest Collected 1,516.26 

320,063.16 

By Cash Paid Treasurer 318,187.56 

By Abatements 54.40 

318,241.96 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 31,821.20 

1926 POLL TAX 

To Uncollected Dec. 31, 1926 3370.00 

By Cash Paid Treasurer 110.00 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 3260.00 

1926 PROPERTY TAX 

To Uncollected Dec. 31, 1926 345,722.28 

To Interest Collected 753.28 

346,475.56 
By Cash Paid Treasurer 331,060.88 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 315,414.68 

30 



1927 POLL TAX 

To Warrant 31,292.00 

By Cash Paid Treasurer 788.00 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 3504.00 

1927 PROPERTY TAX 

To Warrants 392,628.42 

Interest Collected 31.09 

392,659.51 

By Cash Paid Treasurer 343,249.70 

By Abatements 17.85 

. 343,267.55 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 349,391.96 

January 19, 1928. 

I have this day examined the books of the Tax Collector 
and find the accounts payed to the Treasurer are correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 



31 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 

Income Expense Balance 

Fund 1927 1927 1927 

Hannah W. Smith £14.54 £4.00 260.48 

Augusta Wells 16.42 10.00 368.22 

Oliver Warner 2.32 2.00 52.16 

John H. Sanderson 4.82 4.00 107.39 

Luman M.Moore 10.29 8.00 228.83 

P.M.Wells 5.61 5.00 124.57 

Benjamin Waite 3.60 2.00 81.26 

Abby Dickinson 4.43 3.50 98.92 

Silas G. Hubbard 11.07 4.00 251.04 

Levi Graves 7.03 4.00 157.86 

Lucy L.Morton 13.18 4.00 297.49 

Charles Smith 5.00 4.00 111.47 

Lemuel B. Field 4.97 4.00 110.87 

Charlotte G. Wilkie 56.21 1,291.70 

Rufus H. Cowles 5.04 4.00 112.51 

Charles E. Hubbard 5.27 4.00 117.57 

Alpheus Cowles 4.89 4.00 108.64 

James Porter 4.75 4.00 105.48 

Daniel W. Allis 7.65 5.00 171.55 

J.H.Howard 4.73 4.00 105.19 

Fannie M. Burke 4.79 4.00 106.57 

Charles S. Shattuck 4.79 4.00 106.38 

Seth W. Kingsley 4.75 4.00 105.44 

E.S.Warner 9.61 7.00 214.00 

Reuben Belden 5.20 119.94 

Theodore Porter 4.64 4.00 102.82 

Charles L. Graves 4.64 4.00 102.86 

Roswell Hubbard 4.59 4.00 102.28 

Cooley D. Dickinson 5.79 5.00 128.01 

Eliiah Bardwell 15.19 4.00 345.31 

Joseph D. Billings 4.59 4.00 101.48 

Memorial Town Hall, Int 149.95 3,843.16 

Edward C. Billings 28.10 20.00 575.50 

Augusta Beals 4.68 4.00 103.69 

Anthony Douglas 2.52 52.70 

Received : 

Perpetual Care Funds Received. 3151.50 

Paid out Care of Lots 151.50 

J. E. Porter, New Account 100.00 

Jonathan Graves, New Account 100.00 

Hugh McLeod, New Account 100.00 

V. H. KELLER, 

Treasurer. 



32 



Police Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31st, 1927, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1927 84 

Offences for which Arrests were made 

Assault and Battery 4 

Larceny 5 

Trespass 6 

Contempt of Court 1 

Drunkenness 21 

Forgery 2 

Gaming 11 

Violation of Liquor Law 2 

Motor Vehicle Violations 21 

Committed to State Hospital 3 

Returned to State Hospital 2 

Committed to Lyman School 1 

Returned to Veterans Hospital 3 

Taking Wood on Land of Another 1 

Breaking Glass 1 

Total 84 

Total Fines, District Court £1,070.00 

Of this amount, $400.00 was for violation of automobile 
laws, leaving a balance of $670.00 returned to the Town. 
$220.00 was turned over to the Town by this Department for 
money collected for damage done to bridges and fences. 

We have had a large number of minor automobile accidents 
this past year, not any proving fatal. There was two drownings, 
one young woman and one man, both taking place in the Conn- 
ecticut River. 

There still seems to be some misunderstanding in regard to 
just when Dog Taxes are due. This year it was a long drawn 
out job to get the taxes in. Dog Taxes are due on March 31st, 
of each year. On July 15th, of each year the Police Officer 
of every town is given a warrant instructing him to kill all 

33 



unlicensed dogs and to summon the owner of said dog into 
court. No one wants their dog killed, and I don't think any 
one wants to be summoned to court, but dog taxes have to be 
paid. Your Town Clerk, on a certain day in each year has to 
make his return as to the number of dogs, and also taxes col- 
lected on same to the County. 

I believe that we have been lenient in regard to these 
taxes. Now to make it more pleasant for yourself as well as 
for the officer who is given the warrant you should see that 
your dog taxes are paid when due, March 31st. 

The owner or keeper of a dog may at any time have it 
licensed until the first day of April following, and a person who 
becomes the owner or keeper of a dog after April first which 
is not duly licensed and the owner or keeper of a dog which 
becomes three months old after Maich 31st in any year shall, 
when it is three months old, cause it to be registered, numbered, 
described, licensed and collared as required by law. 

During this last year new signs were placed at all the 
schools and also at intersecting streets. These signs had not 
been installed but about two months and about all of them have 
been scratched and marked up. 

Now this is done mostly by children going to school. The law 
is very strict on any one defaceing these warning signs, and no 
one wants to give any boy a court record but if this continues 
something will have to be done in regard to same. 

Permit me to take this occasion to express my appreciation 
of your very real support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



34 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 1927 
BIRTHS 

MONTHS ^£§^S^^<c£o£QH 

Male 21322215 1042 25 

Female 2 1 2 1 2 5 2 3 1 3 22 

Total 4 2 3 4 2 3 3 10 3 3 5 5 47 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 

Male Female 

United States .10 18 

Poland 29 23 

Czecho-Slovakia 4 4 

Germany 2 2 

Canada 2 

47 47 

BIRTHS FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 
1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 

83 88 88 52 46 

MARRIAGES . ^ & , Q 3 

BY MONTHS ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ £ 
210104324583 33 
First Marriage of Both, 29. 
Second of Groom, 4. 
Oldest Groom, 49. 
Youngest Groom, 20. 
Oldest Bride, 46. 
Youngest Bride, 16. 

BIRTHPLACE 

Groom Bride 

United States 29 32 

Poland 3 1 

Germany 1 



33 



35 



33 



NAMES OF PERSONS 
Hugh McLeod 
Peter J. Donovan 
Matthew J. Ryan 
Anna Chandler Bitner 
William C. Machester 
Alexander Bielecki 
Wladyslaw Karpinski 
Miechael Pelc 
Ella G. Slattery Hafey 
Frederick H. Bardwell 
Sabina P. Ziezinlewicz 
Catherine W. Domeroski 
Anna B. Eldridge 
Eva M. Brehm 
Mary O'Neill 
James Walsh 

Age of oldest person deceased 



DECEASED 

Paul Ondras 
John A. Zawacki 
Clemens Ziezulewicz 
Mary J. Ryan 

■ Mielseki 

Henry G. Moore 
Mary B. Powers 
Mary R. Doppman 
John H. Ryan 
Patrick A. McGlynn 
Hannah M. Powers 
Jacob Geis 
Margaret B. Hade 
George P. Shea 
Hannah T. Proulx 

(female) 89 years. 



DOGS LICENSED 

136 Male Dogs at £2.00 each £272.00 

21 Female Dogs at £5.00 each 105.00 

$377.00 
Less Fees 157 Dogs at 20c each 331.40 

£345.60 
Paid County Treasurer £345.60 



36 



Assessor's Report 

1927 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate £460. 148.00 

Value of Assessed Real Estate 2,618,105.00 

Total Value of Assessed Estate 33,078,253.00 

Value of Assessed Buildings £1,563,040.00 

Value of Assessed Land 1,055,065.00 

33,078,253.00 

Number of Polls Assessed 646 

Residents Assessed on Property T 598 

Non-Residents Assessed on Property 11 

Number of Persons Assessed on Property 876 

For Poll Tax Only 201 

Rate of Tax per 31,000.00 \ . 330.00 

Number of Horses Assessed 319 

Number of Cows Assessed 298 

Number of Neat Cattle Assessed 54 

Number of Sheep 156 

Number of Fowls 1,203 

Number of Dwelling Houses 448 

Acres of Land 9,050 

State Tax 36,960.00 

State Highway Tax 3708.00 

County Tax 311,396.56 

Town Tax 396,050.08 

State Audit 31,289.02 

Overlayings 3219.40 

Addition to Warrant 3280.83 

Estimated Receipts: 

Bank and Corporation Tax 31,800.00 

Income Tax 312,744.67 

All Others: 38,438.80 

Value of Property Exempt from Tax under Chap. 
59, General Laws: 

Church Property 353,700.00 

Town Property 3256,375.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON H. DWIGHT, [Assessors 

VERNET H. KELLER, \ of 

EDW. A. BREOR, [Hatfield. 
37 



Water Commissioners' Report 

The following is respectfully submitted as the 32nd annual 
report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 



33,241.04 


654.47 


20.00 


1,537.11 


12.50 


6,071.65 


138.41 



Receipts for 1927 
Balance of Deposit, First National Bank 
M. J. Ryan, Treasurer Sinking Fund 

B. Fralick, Broken Hydrant 

Sale 2 N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R. Bonds. 

Town of Whately, Water Rent 

E. W. Strong, Collector Water Rents 
Int. on Bank Balance and Liberty Bond 



Paid Out 1927 

North Hatfield Grain Co.,. Cement". .... 38.00 

Filing Equipment Bureau, Cards 15.22 

W. H. Riley & Co., Labor and Supplies. 117.96 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe Co., Water Pipe. . . 1,016.46 

Water Commissioners, Salaries 100.00 

E. L. Graves, Labor and Supplies 12.95 

L. A. Deinlein, Labor, Laying Water 

Pipe 855.60 

Northampton Water Dept., Labor and 

Materials 918.55 

Town of Hatfield, for Flood Damage . . . 2,500.00 

F. I. Webster Co., Repair Parts 2.83 

Joseph T. Ryan, Labor 235.00 

E. W. Strong, Collector, Salary and 

Cash Paid 767.57 

Northampton Engineering Co., Hydrants 239.95 
Cash Balance on Deposit First National 

Bank 4,885.09 

Assets 

Cash on Deposit in First Nat. Bank. . . . 34,885.09 

One Liberty Bond 1,000.00 

Northampton Nat. Bank, Special Acct. . 2,595.04 

38 



311,675.18 



311,675.18 



First Nat. Bank, Savings Dept 31,281.86 

Amherst Savings Bank 2,022.65 

Hampshire Trust Co., Savings Dept. . . . 2,091.01 

$ 18, 760. 74 

Now that the last of the water bonds have been retired we 
are going to be able to make some necessary improvements, to 
our water system that we have wanted to make for some time. 

The first thing we did this year was to chart, each on an 
individual card all the gates on water lines leading to private 
houses. This is going to be of great value in locating gates 
particularly in the winter when the ground is covered with snow. 

In addition to this we have laid 950 feet of 4-inch pipe 
in Tompson lot and replaced an inch pipe on the plain road 
going north from Frank Vollinger's corner for 900 feet, thus 
giving ample water and fire protection to seven more houses. 

There are .still two houses in town without the water and 
we hope to supply one and if possible both this coming summer. 

There are many other improvements which we have in 
view and are planning to make as soon as we get the funds. 
Our policy being to add a little to our reserve each year in order 
to be in shape to take care of any emergency and to use the 
balance of our income on improvements to our system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. KILEY, 
LAURENCE DEINLEIN, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Water Commissioners of the Town of Hatfield and find them 
correct with orders on file for all payments made and a balance 
of #18, 760.74 in the treasury. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

January 19, 1928. Auditor. 



39 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Libra? y: 

The circulation of books and magazines during the past 
year was 7,170 in the adult department and 6,295 in the juv- 
enile, making a total circulation of 13,465. 

402 books have been added to the library, 390 were pur- 
chased, 12 were gifts, 185 were purchased for the juvenile 
department, 115 being for young children. 

The following is a partial list of books added. 



Ashman, Margaret 
Bailey, Temple, 
Baldwin. Faith. 
Barry, Charles, 
Bartley, Xalbro, 
Bindloss, Harold 
Brown. Andrew C, 
Bryner, Edna, 
Boyd. James 
Canfield, Dorothy, 
Catha Willa, 
Chambers, Robert, 
Clarke, John Boyd 
Cooke, Grace McGowan, 
Crofts, Freeman W., 
Cushman, Clarissa, 
Davis, Elmer, 
Davis, William Stearns, 
Dawson, Coningsby. 
de la Roche, Mazo, 
Dell, Ethel M. 5 
Erskine, John, 
Ferber, Edna. 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Fletcher, J. S., 
Fletcher, J. S., 



Fiction 

Pa 

Wallflowers 

Thresholds 

Mouhs House, Mystery 

Bread and Jam 

The Dark Road 

Josselin Takes a Hand 

Andy Brandt's Ark 

Marching On 

Raw Material 

Death Comes for the Archbishop 

The Drums of Aulone 

Findings is Keepings 

Man Behind the Mask 

The Cheyne Mystery 

The New Poor 

I'll Show You the Town 

Gilman of Redford 

When Is Always 

Jalma 

The Black Knight 

Galahad 

Emma McChesney 

Annexation Society 

The King versus Wargrave 

The Mill of Many Windows 

The Wolves and the Lamb 

40 



Fielding, A., 
Furman, Lucy, 
Garland, Hamlin, 
Gibbs, A. Hamilton, 
Gibbs, Anthony, 
Gibbs, George, 
Gibbs, Sir Philip, 
Gibbs, Sir Philip, 
Gregory, Jackson, 
Grey, Zane, 
Grey, Zane, 
Hull, Helen, 
Johnston, William, 
Jordan, Elizabeth, 
Kilbourne, Fannie, 
Kyne, Peter B., 
Le May Alan, 
Lincoln, Joseph, 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill, 
Lutz, Grace L. Hill, 
Lowndes, Mrs. Belloc, 
McCulley, Johnston, 
McCutcheon, George Barr, 
McGowan, Alice, 
Marshall, Archibald, 
Marshall, Archibald, 
Marshall, Edison, 
Miller, Alice Duer, 
Norris, Kathleen, 
Paine, Elizabeth, 
Parmenter, Christine, 
Parrish, Anne, 
Peel, Doris, 
Perry, Stella, 
Phillips, Charles, 
Prouty, Olive, 
Pedler, Margaret, 
Rath, E. J., 
Rath, E. J., 
Rath, E.J. , 



The Eames-Erskine Case 

The Lonesome Road 

Trail Makers of the Middle Border 

Labels 

Peter Vacuum 

Castle Rock Mystery 

The Middle of the Road 

The Reckless Lady 

Captain Cavalier 

Forlorn River 

Under Tonto Rim 

Islanders 

The Affair in Duplex 9B 

Black Butterflies 

The Horton Twins 

They Also Serve 

Painted Ponies 

The Aristocratic Miss Brewster 

Job's Niece 

The White Flower 

The Terriford Mystery 

A White Man's Chance 

The Inn of the Hawk and Raven 

Shaken Down 

The Allbrights 

That Island 

The Deadfall 

Instruments of Darkness 

Barbary Bush 

Hearthstones 

The Unknown Port 

Tomorrow Morning 

Children of the Wind 

The Defenders 

The Doctor's Warning 

Conflict 

Yesterday's Harvest 

The Brat 

Sam 

When the Devil was Sick 



41 



Rath, E. J, 
Richmond, Grace, 
Rinehart, Mary Roberts, 
Rolvaag, O. E., 
Sabatini, Rafael, 
Sabatini, Rafael, 
Shepherd^ Eric, 
Stead, Robert, 
Tarkington, Booth, 
Tilden, Freeman, 
Tracy, Louis, 
Train, Arthur, 
Von Zeikursch, Theodore, 
Von Zeikursch, Theodore, 
Walpole, Hugh, 
Walpole, Hugh, 
Wentworth, Patricia, 
Wentworth, Patricia, 
Walsh, Maurice, 
Wharton,' Edith, 
White, Stewart Edward, 
White, Stewart Edward, 
Whitlock, Brand, 
Widdemer, Margaret, 
White, Nelia G., 
Williams, Marguerite, 
Willsie, Honore, 
Wodehouse, P. I., 
Wodehouse, P. I., 
Wren, Percival, 
Wright, Harold Bell, 
Yates, Domford, 



A Good Indian 

Lights Up 

Lost Ecstacy 

Giants in the Earth 

St. Martin's Summer 

Mistress Wilding 

Coming the Rose 

Grain 

The Plutocrat 

Wild Money 

The Black Cat 

When Tutt Meets Tutt 

White Trails End 

Where the Waters Turn 

Hormer John 

Jeremy of Crale 

The Amazing Chance 

Hue and Cry 

Key Avobe the Door 

Twilight Sleep 

Back of Beyond 

The Glory Hole 

Transplanted 

More than W r ife 

Jen Culliton 

Splendid Joy 

Forever Free 

Carry on Jeeves 

The Small Bachelor 

Beau Sabreur 

God and the Grocery Man 

Blind Corners 



Miscellaneous 
Four Months Afootin Spain 
Rise of American Civilization 
The Glorious Adventure 
The Royal Road to Romance 
In Brightest Africa 
Revolt in the Desert 



H. A. Franck 

Beard 

Richard Halliburton 

Richard Halliburton 

Carl Akeley 

T. E. Lawrence 



42 



We, 

Lindbergh, the Lone Eagle, 

Our Times, America Finding Herse 

Trader Horn, 

Woodrow Wilson As I Knew Him 

Ask Me Another, 

Handmade Rugs, 

The Human Body, 

First Aid for Boys, 

Young Folks Book of the Heavens, 

Football and Flow to Watch It 

The Secrets of Baseball, 

Boys Life of Alexander Hamilton, 

Boys Life of Grover Cleveland, 

The Mason Bees, 

School Book of Forestry, 

Common Trees of Massachusetts, 

Stammering, Its Cause and Cure, 

How to Make Your Will, 

Hood Mealsn and How to Prepare 

Selected Poems, 

Birds of Massachusetts, Part II, 



Charles A. Lindbergh 

G. B. Fife 

If, Mark Sullivan 

Alfred A. Horn 

Tumulty 

SpofTord and Esty 

Ella S. Bowles 

M. C. Stopes 

Cole and Ernst 

Mary Proctor 

P. D. Haughton 

M. V. Charnley 

Davis 

J. H. Fabre 

Charles L. Pack, presented 

Charles L. Pack, presented 

presented 

presented 

Them presented 

Walter de la Mare 

Forbush 



Addington, Sarah, 
Alcott, Louisa M., 
Ames, Joseph B., 
Ames, Joseph B., 
Aspinwall, M., 
Blake, Gladys, 
Blake, Gladys, 
Bridgman, Ethel, 
Cladwell, Frank, 
Chiley, F. H., 
Cobb, B. and E., 
Bobb, B. and E., 
Coolidge, Susan, 
Corcoran, Brewer, 
Cross, Donzella, 
Cook, Frances, 



Juvenile 
The Boy Who Lived in Addington Lane 

Ja's Boys 

Clearport Boys 

The Mounted Troop 

Gay's Year on Sunset Island 

At Bow View 

The Mysterious Tutor 

A Year at Miss Austin's 

Wolf, The Storm Leader 

Boy Scout Trail Blazers 

Allspice 

Dan's Boy 

What Kady Did 

Boy Scouts at Camp Lowell 

Music Stories 

Todays Stories of Yesterday 

43 



Dix, 

Donahey, Mary, 
Driggs, L. L., 
Eaton, Walter P., 
Eggleston, G. C, 
Gollomb, Joseph, 
Green, Fitzhugh, 
Grishina, N., 
Gilson, Charles, 
Harris, Stanley, 
James, Will, 
Johnson, Hammel, 
Johnson, Margaret, 
Jones, Willis K., 
Kearton, Will, 
Latham, Harold, 
Lavelle, Edith, 
Lawrence, Josephine, 
London, Jack, 
MacDonald, Marcia, 
McNeile, Everett, 
Mathiews, Franklin, 
Pease, Harold, 
Pierce, Lola, 
Paine, Ralph, 
Paine, Ralph, 
Remy, Jeans, 
Sherman, Harold, 
Sienkiewicz, Henryk, 
Smith, Harriet, 
Turpin, Edna, 
White, Eliza C, 
White, Nelia G., 
Zwilgmeyer, D., 



Merrylips 

Marty Lu 

Adventure of Arnold Adair 

Boy Scouts of Berkshire 

Long Knives 

Working Through at Lincoln High 

Hold 'em Navy 

Shorty 

The Zulu Trail 

Playing the Game 

Sm9ky 

Prydehurst 

Dorothea's Double 

The Hammond Twins 

My Friend Toto 

Marty Lends A Hand 

Girls Scouts at Miss Allen's School 

Elizabeth Ann's Six Cousins 

Brown Wolf 

The Honor Girl 

Daniel Du Luth 

Boy Scouts Courageous 

The Tattooed Man 

The House That Ran Away 

College Year 

First Down Kentucky 

Lives of the Presidents 

Fight 'em Big Three 

In Desert and Wilderness 

Peggy Raymond's Vacation 

Honey Sweet 

Joan Morse 

Mary 

Inger Johanne's Lively Doings 

ELLEN A. WAITE, 

Librarian. 



44 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1927 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patrick W. Mullins, Chairman Term expires 1929 

Cora King Graves, Secretary Term expires 1928 

Joseph F. Chandler Term expires 1930 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 
19 Bates Street, Northampton Telephone 1088 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M.D. (Center and North Hatfield Schools) 
C. A. Byrnes, M.D. (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hatfield Schools) 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Chief Arthur R. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 
October 1, 1927 

Boys 

Between 5 and 7 61 

Between 7 and 14 274 

Between 14 and 16 53 



Total 388 378 766 



Girls 


Total 


60 


121 


269 


543 


49 


102 



47 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 

( Opens January 3, 1928 



First Winter Term — 8 Weeks. . 
Second Winter Term — 7 Weeks 
Spring Term — 7 Weeks 



I Closes February 24, 1928 
Opens March* 5, 1928 
Closes April 20, 1928 
Opens April 30, 1928 
Closes June 15, 1928 
Opens September 10, 1928 
Closes December 21, 1928 



Fall Term — 15 Weeks 

First Winter Term Opens January 2, 1929 

Xo school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 



Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following 
Monday is observed as a holiday. 

Legal holidays in Massachusetts include January first, 
February twenty-second, April nineteenth, May thirtieth, 
July Fourth, the first Monday in September, October twelfth, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



48 



Jn mpmnrtam 



MARY B. POWERS 

1871 — 1927 
TEACHER 

1889 — 1927 



Mrs. Powers will long be remembered 
by the children, the teachers, the school 
officials and the parents, as an individual 
of rare personality, optomistic vision, 
broad sympathies, superior qualities as a 
teacher, and as a big-hearted friend to 
all with whom she came in contact. 



49 



Report of School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield: 

The total membership in all the schools for 1926 was 739; 
for 1927, it was 762, or a gain of 23. The conditions at the 
Center remain about the same, but at Bradstreet there has been 
a steady increase in the school enrolment. In 1923, there were 
57 in all grades. Now, there are 87, a gain of 30. Next Septem- 
ber there will be about 95. Last September, desks were in- 
stalled in the primary room for an additional grade thereby 
relieving the pressure in the other rooms. It will be necessary 
this year either to enlarge the room at Bradstreet or transport 
the 8th grade pupils to the Center School. 

By examining the financial statement, it is shown that the 
department had a balance at the close of the year of 31,760.55. 
This was possible because of the mild weather which reduces the 
consumption of coal, the minimum amount of alterations and 
repairs, and small savings in other departments. 

While the total budget for the schools seems large, the main- 
tenance cost per pupil, which is the only fair basis of computa- 
tion, is low. According to the last State Report available, 
the cost per pupil attending the schools was $64.80. The cost 
in Hadley on the same basis w r as $63.28; Sunderland, $71.36; 
South Hadley, $73,34; Williamsburg, $81.28; Deerfield, $91.41; 
Amherst, $97.67; Pelham, $112.02. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PATRICK W. MULLINS, 
CORA KING GRAVES, 
JOSEPH F. CHANDLER. 



50 



Financial Statement 

December 31, 1927 



RESOURCES 

Town Appropriation #53,400.00 

Smith-Hughes Fund 371.71 

■ 253,771.71 

EXPENDITURES 

School Committee ?23"5.00 

Census and other expenses 44.00 

Supt. of Schools and Attendance Officer 2,511.62 
Supervisors of Music, Drawing and Pen- 
manship, and Health Education 2,779.13 

Teachers — Academy 11,246.14 

Teachers — Elementary 21,185.75 

Books and Supplies 3,583.26 

Janitors and Supplies 3,192.75 

Fuel • 3^872.77 

Repairs 1,289.85 

Miscellaneous 453.59 

Transportation— Academy 1,047.00 

Transportation — Elementary 570.30 

352,011.16 



?1,760.55 



ESTIMATED FINANCIAL BUDGET FOR 1928 

School Committee 3200.00 

Superintendent of Schools and Atten- 
dance Officer 2,500.00 

Supervisors of Music, Drawing and Pen- 
manship, and Health Education 2,800.00 

Teachers— Academy 11,400.00 

Teachers— Elementary 21,400.00 

Books and Supplies 3,500.00 

51 



Janitors and Supplies £3, 250.00 

Fuel 4,500.00 

Repairs 1,500.00 

Miscellaneous 500.00 

Transportation — Academy. 1,000.00 

Transportation — Elementary 700.00 

— £53,250.00 

Smith-Hughes Fund 350.00 



Total Budget for 1928 £52,900.00 

From this amount is deducted State Reimbursements, 



tuition and funds from Smith Academy Trustees. The balance 
is raised by the town. These amounts for 1927 were: Income 
Tax, £14,931.31; Tuition, £317.07; Smith Academy Trustees 
£500.00; State Reimbursement for Vocational Education 
£2,616.39. 



52 



Report of Supt. of Schools 



To the School Committee of Hatfield: 

In 1922, it was voted by the Joint Committee of this 
Union to issue one report in December which should cover the 
financial transactions and other data for the fiscal year and that 
the superintendent of schools should issue in June for both 
towns a report covering the activities of the schools from Septem- 
ber to June. This plan was changed last. June and this report 
combines the two ideas. It covers the financial year — January 
to December of 1927, and the report for the school year — 
September 1926 to June 1927. It contains only the data for 
the town in which the report is issued with the exception of a 
few items of general interest to both towns. 

WHAT IS THE AIM OF EDUCATION? 

By M. M. Parks 
Milledgeville, Ga. 

What is the aim of Education? 

The Scholar says Knowledge. 

The Preacher says Character. 

The Minister says Service. 

The Philosopher says Truth. 

The Artist says Beauty. 

The Epicurean says Happiness. 

The Stoic says Self-Control. 

The Christian says Self-Denial. 

The Democrat says Self-Government. 

The Statesman says Co-operation. 

The Ruler says Loyalty. 

The Sage says Wisdom. 

The Youth says Achievement. 

The Soldier says Courage. 

The Editor says Success. 

The Manufacturer says Efficiency. 

The Banker says Thrift. 

The Dreamer says Vision. 

The Child says Play. 

53 



The Man says Work. 

The Friend says Comradeship. 

The Pedagogue says Personality. 

The Physician says Health. 

The Biologist says Growth. 

The Psychologist says Development. 

The Sociologist says Adjustment. 

Education is all of these and more. 
Prof. Thomas H. Briggs of Columbia in an address before 
a body of educators defined the aim of education in a very 
comprehensive and sensible way when he said that the aim of 
education in our schools should be to train the pupils to do 
better the things that they are going to do anyway and at the 
same time to broaden and enrich their interests. 

This is a very rapid and complex age. The demands upon 
youth while in school and when they go out from school are 
much more perplexing and strenuous than ever before. For 
these reasons, the more mature should set up by their own con- 
duct the best standards possible. They should provide through 
the schools the very best opportunities for a varied yet efficient 
system of training and then they should be patient and helpful 
in assisting the boys and girls in their effort to make right 
adjustments in the home, in the community, in the avocations 
and in the vocations of life. 

The education of youth is the most important and the 
biggest business in which each community is engaged. Just 
as soon as business conditions warrant, some very important 
readjustments should be made in our system of education that 
it may be kept up to date and serve the boys and girls as fully 
and efficiently as they are served in any other community. 
These changes will demand a better adjustment to the needs of 
those who develop more slowly than the average, to those who 
develop much more rapidly than the average and to those who 
need a greater variety of opportunities to test and check up 
their natural aptitudes that they may know without waste 
of time and effort the line of procedure in which they are most 
likely to succeed. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 
The writer believes that the teachers during the year have 
succeeded in making the schools just a little more like ideal 

54 



homes. The general atmosphere of the schools is being made 
more and more conductive to the development of a friendly 
and thoughtful spirit toward those with whom the children 
associate. The aim is to have the children happy, comfortable, 
interested, industrious and co-operative in all the activities 
of the school. 

Tests of different types have been given from time to time to 
check up the progress of the individuals and classes that the 
weak places might be discovered early and strengthened. 
Among others the test in arithmetic prepared under the direc- 
tion of Professor Wilson of Boston University for all New 
England was given and results compared. The results by 
grades were as follows: Grades 5. for New England, the score 
was 41.2 points; for Massachusetts, 41.6; for this Union, 41.4: 
Grades 6, New England score, 43.1; Massachusetts, 43.5; 
this Union, 45.3; Grades 7, New England, 43.8; Massachusetts, 
46.3; this Union, 44.1 points. 

As these tests were not compulsory, the probabilities are 
that only those towns and cities that felt that the work in 
arithmetic was fairly creditable gave the tests. If this were 
true, these averages represent the work in the best educatioanl 
centers. 

While the results were more or less unsatisfactory, it was 
somewhat gratifying to see that our schools as a whole measured 
up to the best achievements in other towns and cities. Effort 
is now being made to strengthen the weak places and we trust 
that another similar test will show even better results. 

As stated in the last report, the weakest place in the whole 
curriculum seems to be the work in history. All the teachers 
are giving this branch careful attention and the results are 
being improved steadily but rather slowly. 

HEALTH 

One of the most important subjects in the course of study, 
in my opinion, is health education. The aim is to develop in 
the child the right attitude toward personal, home and com- 
munity hygiene, and the correct habits of life so that he will be 
able to care for himself scientifically when not in school. Miss 
Marian Holmes, the supervisor of health education, has sel- 
ected an excellent series of text-books, established in co-operation 

55 



with the school physicians, a most efficient system of inspection, 
standards of achievement, personal instruction through con- 
ferences with individuals, class instruction and school clinics. 

In her report, Miss Holmes says, "During the school year 
and usually at the beginning of school, every child receives a 
good physical examination by the school physician and a 
report is sent home if anything serious is detected. The de- 
tailed medical inspection by the nurse and the ear and eye 
test given by the teacher completes the routine. However. 
during the whole school year individual children are being 
cared for by teacher and nurse, and the school physician also 
gives freely of his time whenever called upon for consultation. 
In all this work the objective of the school program of health 
teaching is to impress upon the child the importance of keeping 
well rather than being cured. 

"The health rating of the child is classified as 'excellent' 
or 'good' and a report card given to that effect. To pass the 
'minimum requirements' the child must possess permanent, 
(normal or corrected), teeth, healthy tonsils, normal breathing, 
normal average weight or its equivalent, clean skin, good 
vision, (normal or corrected) good hearing, good posture and 
a clean general appearance. Every child has a right to possess 
this start in life, but the data given below shows that there is 
much work to be done before these standards are reached. 

"The record for the Hatfield schools for the minimum 
health requirement test is as follows: 

Name of School Passed Failed Heart Vision 

Center 190 89 2 5 

School St 49 20 1 

Bradstreet 65 22 2 2 

North Hatfield 41 29 1 4 

West Hatfield 47 14 2 3 

Hill 42 18 3 1 

"There were 14 cases of thyroid enlargement noted in the 
Center School. This condition merits a careful investigation. 

"A Mental Hygiene clinic under the direction of State 
specialists was conducted during the year and 35 children 
received careful examination. The object of this clinic is to 
assist the superintendent and teacher to better understand and 

56 



adjust children who are slow in mental development. The full 
reports have not yet been submitted. 

"The Dental clinic under the direction of the Hampshire 
County Red Cross will be in operation sometime during the 
winter of 1928. 

"The hot cocoa lunch prepared for the children at the 
Center School during the cold weather is a splendid feature 
and all concerned in the work deserve much credit. 

"No particular mention has been made of the health of the 
High School pupils, but the same physical examination has been 
given as in the lower grades, and a finer assembly of young 
people would be hard to find. Their interest and success in 
athletics and their general appearance is all that is needed to 
classify their health status as excellent. 

"I wish to express my appreciation of the courtesy re- 
ceived from the parents when visiting the homes. It has been a 
pleasure to meet them and my only regret is that I have not 
had time to visit all the homes. It has also been a pleasure 
to work with teachers who are so interested in health education 
and to them as well as to the Superintendent, School Physicians 
and Committee I heartily express my appreciation of the splend- 
did co-operation during the school year." 

PENMANSHIP AND DRAWING 

In the report on these subjects, Mrs. Bernice Bradley 
Ormond says, "The aim of penmanship instruction should be 
to teach pupils to write easily and well and to establish good . 
penmanship habits. 

"Unless the pupil carries over the principles taught in the 
writing period, the time spent in drill is lost. All written 
work should be checked up, and where teachers are doing this, 
the work has been most satisfactory. 

"The awards received this year in the Union are as follows: 
180 Primary pins; 47 Progressive pins; 21 Improvement Certi- 
ficates; 45 Final Certificates; 2 Business Certificates. 

"Free expression or illustration is the subject we are 
trying to develop in our art courses. The child must use his 
imagination and draw from his own store of knowledge in this 
work. In every way possible individuality should be en- 
couraged and the child's point of view taken. Games, nursery 
rhymes and stories lend themselves to this type of work. 

57 



"Some very interesting travel posters were made by child- 
ren in grades 6, 7 and 8 during the Spring term. The poster 
problem is always a profitable one. 

"I take this opportunity to thank Mr. Morton for his 
support and co-operation, and the principals and teachers for 
their sincere efforts in the work of the year." 

MUSIC 

Miss Maude E. Boyle in her report says, "The most 
desirable way to teach music is that which develops in our 
children an appreciation of rhythm, melody and harmony, the 
three fundamentals of music. We give them that foundation, 
the ultimate aim of which is, to discover and to develop the 
talent which is theirs. Should no special talent be discoverable, 
we aim to make clear to them the beauty that is in music, and 
to enable them to discriminate between the false and the real. 

"One of the most important activities in our music course is 
the singing of worthy songs intelligently. To accomplish this, 
we must give attention to melody, harmony, phrasing, rhythm, 
tonality and enunciation. 

"Other important phases are individual and sight singing 
both with notes and words. Much more stress is put on word 
reading at sight than formerly. We now introduce it in the 
fourth grade and find that it is working out very satisfactorily. 

"The entire body of students furnished music at Field 
Day exercises in June. The children of all the schools including 
the Smith Academy chorus also furnished music at the Mem- 
orial Day exercises. 

"The musical organizations of Smith Academy, the Girls 
Glee Club, the Boys Glee Club, the Chorus and Orchestra have 
furnished music for various school activities, namely, the 
senior play, prize speaking, class day and graduation. 

"The Academy Orchestra assisted by the Boys Glee Club 
gave a concert on April 20th. The object of this concert was 
to give the parents and friends an opportunity to hear what 
these young people are doing and also to raise funds for another 
instrument. This orchestra gave a half hour's concert at 
Laurel Park Chatauqua last July. 

"The Smith Academy students receive one point credit 
for music. The credit for the year is forfeited if the student 

58 



is not present to take part at any public appearance required, 
unless a satisfactory excuse is presented. 

"I feel justified in saying that this has been one of the most 
successful yeais in music. The young people have entered 
into the work with a finer spirit and more enthusiasm than 
ever before and the result has been 'music for the love of music'. 
If the feeling continues and we sincerely trust that it will, we 
hope to do better things during the coming year. 

"These public appearances mean much strenuous work on 
the part of the teachers and pupils. The success of these under- 
takings has depended to a great extent on the above mentioned, 
therefore I take this opportunity to thank the school officials, 
the principals and the grade teachers for their splendid support 
and hearty co-operation." 

ATTENDANCE 

At the close of this report will be found the total enrol- 
ment, average membership, average attendance and percent 
of attendance for the school year — Sept. 1926 to June 1927. 
The percent is one less than the previous year. In 1926, it 
was 94%. In 1927, it is 93%. Shields were offered both 
years to the three schools in the Union having the highest 
percent of attendance. They were won in 1926 by the West 
Street School, Hadley; North Hadley Intermediate, and North 
Hadley Grammar. In 1927, the West Street School of Hadley, 
grades 1 and 2, Violet Woiczinlenas, teacher, again won First 
Prize with a score of 98.23%. The Second Prize was won again 
by the North Hadley Intermediate, grades 3, 4, 5, Helena A. 
White, teacher, with a score of 97.71%. The Third Prize was 
won by grade 1 of the Center School, Hatfield, Lena F. 
Fitzgerald, teacher, with a score of 97.02%. 

The following schools in Hatfield merit special mention: 
Bradstreet, Catherine B. Harris, teacher, 95.93%; Center, 
Mary E. Fenton, teacher, 95.75%; Center, Hilda V. Corman, 
teacher, 95.73%; Bradstreet, Kathleen Connelly, teacher, 
95.63%; Bradstreet, Ellen M. O'Hara, teacher, 95.45%. 

Many parents do not yet realize the loss imposed upon 
their children by absence from school. The loss is also a class, 
school and community loss. If there could be co-operation 
of all the factors of the environment for the prevention of un- 

59 



necessary absences, school efficiency would greatly increase. 
The causes for which a child may be legally absent from school 
are extremely limited. 

In connection with the subject of attendance, I wish to call 
your particular attention to Mr. Gifford's report. He shows 
in a very convincing way the tremendous handicap under which 
the Academy is forced to do its work because of the irregularity 
of attendance of a certain group of pupils. 

We urge the teachers, parents and children to make an 
extra effort to raise the percent of attendance to the highest 
point possible as every absence causes a waste of opportunity 
and public money. 

CONCLUSION 

This has been a very pleasant and profitable school year. 
Excellent work has been accomplished and a fine spirit main- 
tained. May we work together during the coming year in 
the same spirit as last to advance the highest and best interests 
of the schools and communities. 

In closing this report, I wish to express my appreciation 
of the loyal support and the co-operation of the School Com- 
mittee, principals, teachers, parents and pupils in the work of 
the schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORION A. MORTON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



60 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF SMITH ACADEMY 

This is a day of specialization in which the "Jack of all 
trades and master of none" is at a distinct disadvantage. 
Realizing this, more and more young people throughout the 
country are completing their high school courses and are con- 
tinuing their education along special lines. Thus a high school 
education is coming to be a greater factor in the preparation 
for life, and in many cases a prerequisite for specialization. 

Through our courses in Smith Academy we aim to develop 
interests and some skill which will be of benefit to the pupil and 
to the community. Besides the scholastic work and the work 
of the two vocational departments there is an opportunity to 
participate in athletics, dramatics, musical organizations, a 
dancing class, and other school activities. This program is as 
complete as seems advisable to offer at present. 

A large proportion of the boys participate in one or more 
forms of athletics, and there is a considerable interest among 
the girls in basketball. For our athletic program we need 
money for equipment, transportation, and referees. Our 
source of income has been limited to gate receipts from basket- 
ball games and to dues collected from pupils. The latter is a 
common but questionable source, and the former is insufficient. 
Since athletics is an important phase of school activity I would 
like to see it placed on a firmer financial basis. This could be 
done by a small appropriation for athletic supplies. 

During the year 1926-27 we enrolled eighty-three pupils 
and graduated sixteen. Three of the latter went directly to 
college, one each to Dartmouth, M. A. C, and the University 
of Vermont. Two entered normal schools, and a number of 
others have continued their education elsewhere. Of the class 
of 1926 four entered normal schools and eight commercial 
schools. During the present school year we have enrolled 
ninety-four pupils, forty-seven boys and forty-seven girls. 
Thirty-two have been transported by the B. & M. Transpor- 
tation Company, fourteen from West Hatfield, twelve from 
North Hatfield, and six from Bradstreet. 

61 



I wish to call your attention to the seriousness of our at- 
tendance record. The average attendance in Massachusetts 
high schools is about 95% for forty weeks, while ours is about 
90% for thirty-eight weeks. It is thus apparent that the 
average pupil here is getting four weeks less school than the 
average in the state. It should be evident also that this ren- 
ders more difficult the process of education. 

The excuse for the absence is principally "work at home," 
and in very few cases "illness." I am not unmindful, however, 
of the agricultural situation in Hatfield which requires help 
from many pupils during several very short periods, but I do 
believe that a better attendance record is most desirable and 
quite possible. 

FLAVEL M. GIFFORD. 



62 









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64 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

TOWN OFFICERS 

of the 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1928 




Metcalf Printing & Publishing Company, 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Selectmen's Warrant 
For Town Meeting, February 4, 1929 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables of the Town of Hat- 
field in said County, Greetings: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and town affairs 
to meet in Smith Academy Building in said Hatfield, on Mon- 
day, the 4th day of February, next at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
then and there to act on the following articles, to wit: — 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: Moderator, Town Clerk, Three Selectmen, One 
Assessor for 3 years and One Assessor for 2 years, One Water 
Commissioner for 3 years, One member of the School Committee 
for 3 years, Town Treasurer, One Trustee of the Public Library 
for 3 years, Auditor, Tree Warden, Elector under the Will of 
Oliver Smith, Tax Collector, Farm Bureau Director, Six Con- 
stables. All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon and 
be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time as 
the majority of voters present shall direct but in no case will 
they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the evening. 

Article 3. To take any action which might expedite the 
conduct of this assemblage. 

Article 4. To hear the report of the various town officers. 



Article 5. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 6. To take action in relation to the payment of 
the School House Note No. 29 and interest $2,360.00 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81 of the General Laws and raise and ap- 
propriate money for the same. Amount recommended $8050.00 

Article 8. To take action in relation to the maintenance 
and ordinary repairs of bridges, sewers, and sidewalks and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. Amount recommended, 

$2,950.00 

Article 9. To take action in relation to raising and appro- 
priating money to pay bonds of town officers. Amount recom- 
mended $220.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to defray expense of the Memorial Hall for the ensuing 
year. Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for inspection of barns, animals, and slaughtering. 
Amount recommended $300.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Tree Warden and Moth Work. Amount recom- 
mended for Tree Warden $600.00 

Amount recommended for Moth Work $400.00 

Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the maintenance of the Fire Department. Amount 
recommended $900.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Insurance. Amount recommended $870.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Contingencies. Amount recommended $1,000.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for care of the poor for the ensuing year. Amount rec- 
ommended $2,500.00 

4 



Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for Interest. Amount recommended $3 ; 000.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of the salaries of the town officers for 
the ensuing year. Amount recommended $3^500.00 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the maintenance of the schools for the en- 
suing year. Amount recommended $51 ,,950.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more school physicians. 
Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the care of the cemeteries. Amount recom- 
mended - $100.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. Amount recommended $125.00 

Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library. Amount recommended $850.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of the tuition of Hatfield students attend- 
ing Smith Agricultural School. Amount recommended $1200.00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the support of the Hampshire Trustees for County 
Aid to Agriculture per Chap. 273., Acts 1918. Amount recom- 
mended $150.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for street lights. Amount recommended $4440.00 

Article 27. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Police Protection for the ensuing year. Amount rec- 
ommended $2^800.00 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to set up an ex- 
cess and deficiency fund. Amount recommended is $1^000.00 
which shall be taken from the unexpended balance. 

5 



Article 29. To see if the town Mall vote to install street 
lights on any of the following streets. Easterly on Meadow 
Road in Bradstreet, Northerly on North Street, and Southerly 
on Porter Avenue provided said Porter Avenue is accepted as 
a Public Street. The total number of lights estimated are ten. 
And raise and appropriate money for same. Amount recom- 
mended $190.00 

Total Amount recommended $88,855.00 

The Finance Committee and your Board of Selectmen wish 
to state in regard to the requests made for improvements on 
parts of Prospect and Chestnut Street, they feel that all of 
these can be taken care of very nicely if the town accepts 
Article 7, as the increase in revenue will allow for much more 
w,ork being done on town highways. 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
ROBERT L. BELDEN, 
WM. H. DICKINSON, 

Finance Committee. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 

Article 31. To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the the Selectmen. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to allow the 
Assessors to use all free cash toward relieving the tax burden. 

Article 33'. To see if the town will vote to accept so- 
called Porter Avenue, as a Public Street. 

Article 34. To see what action the town will take in relation 
to building the proposed new Memorial Town Hall. 

Article 35. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature for permission 
to Bond the town for a sum not exceeding $30,000.00 to be paid 
in not more than 15 years from date and to be known as the 
Hatfield Memorial Town Hall Loan. 

6 



Article 36. To see if the Voters of the Town of Hatfield 
will permit the following described tract of land to be used as 
a cemetery by the Polish people of said Town of Hatfield: "A 
certain tract or parcel of land situated in said Hatfield, more 
fully bounded and described as follows: On the North by the 
Highway, on the East by land now or formerly of Frank 
Porter and land of Henry Hubbard; on the South by land now 
or formerly of John T.' Kosior and on the West by land now or 
formerly of Benjamin Warner. Containing four (4) acres more 
or less and being a portion of the land deeded by Egbert S. War- 
ner to John T. Kosior by deed dated September 21, 1928 and 
recorded in Hampshire County Registry of Deeds, Book 762, 
Page 16." 

Article 37. To see if the town will vote to transfer thf 
Town Hall Insurance of $2,500.00 to the account of the Memo- 
rial Town Hall Fund. 

Article 38. To see if the town will vote to extend the 
present sewer on Prospect Street to the line of Anthony Penkoski 
property cost of same not to exceed $200.00 and to be taken 
from the Sewer and Sidewalk, and Bridge appropriation. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof in five public places in said town, 
seven days before time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of January in the 
year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred twenty-nine. 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, * 
SCOTT HARRIS, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Selectmen's Report 



Appropriation $3,500.00 

SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS 

Robert J. McGrath, 2nd Chairman Board 

Selectmen $150.00 

Edson W. Strong, Selectman 75.00 

Wm. L. Belden, Selectman 75.00 

C. E. Warner, Auditor 10.00 
V. H. Keller, Treasurer, Town Clerk, 

Clerk Board Selectmen 1,200.00 

John McHugh, Elector 10.00 

Marion C. Billings, ballot clerk 20.00 

John H. Day, ballot clerk 5.00 

Joseph Godin, ballot clerk 20.00 

E. L. Graves, ballot clerk 5.00 

Catherine Mullaney, ballot clerk 15.00 

Margaret P. Ryan, ballot clerk 10.00 

D. J. Ryan, ballot clerk 15.00 
J. R. McGrath, ballot clerk 5.00 
H. J. Morse, ballot clerk 5.00 
M. H. Dwight, a/c 1927 Tax Col. Salary 90.00 
M. H. Dwight, Assessor, 1928 337.50 
D. J. Ryan, a/c 1928 Tax Col. Sal. 400.00 
J. Raffa, Assessor, 1928 234.00 
V. H. Keller, Assessor, 1928 85.50 
Thos. W. Ryan, Registrar, 1928 25.00 
L. A. Billings, Registrar, 1928 25.00 
J. W. Mullins, Registrar, 1928 25.00 
V. H. Keller, Registrar, 1928 25.00 
Chas. W. Wade, Sealer of W. & M. 150.00 
Unexpended balance 483.00 



$3,500.00 



8 



Appropriation 
Smith Hughes 
Sale of Schoo 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Fund 
Tickets 



$52,900.00 

378.85 

12.09 

$53,290.94 



Expenditures 
Academy Teachers 



Flavel M. Gilford 
Harry E. Rollins 
Richard (). Burrill 
John R. Kalloch 
Edward J. Burke 
Alice M. Brock way 
Mary E. Ryan 
Ebba E. Ekberg 
Maxine E. Blanchard 
William P. Boyle 



$1,660.00 

1,140.00 

900.00 

640.00 

2,600.00 

1,365.00 

1,400.00 

1,223.20 

176.80 

225.00 





Vocational 






Elementary 




Clarence J. Larkin 




1,800.00 


Margaret A. Ryan 




1,000.00 


Rose C. Finn 




932.50 


Sarah V. Kiley 




992.50 


Mrs. Grace W. Bard well 




980.00 


Catherine T. Shea 




931.00 


Margaret O'Donnell 




670.00 


Mary E. Fenton 




1,000.00 


Anna O'Neill 




540.00 


Hilda Corman 




600.00 


Mrs. Lena P. Fitzgerald 




980.00 


Mrs. Constance Mullaney 




1,000.00 


Eleanor Whalen 




1,000.00 


Harold L. Ford 




1,200.00 


Margaret B. Schmitter 




600.00 



Mary C. Kelly 995.00 

Mrs. Alary Donellson 1,000.00 

Catherine B. Harris 657.25 

Ellen O'Hara 995.00 

Kathleen Connelly 985.00 

Supervisors 

Maud E. Boyle, Music 910.00 

Mrs. Bernice B. Ormond, Drawing 850.00 

Marian Holmes, Nurse 1,000.00 

Anna C. Donnis 270.00 

Katherine Hayes 360.00 

Marie Proulx 400.00 

Anna Osley 360.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Farley 1 417.50 

Substitute Teachers 

Margaret P. Ryan 27.50 
Marion C. Billings, high 35.00, elem. 70.00 105.00 

Mrs. E. L. Graves 82.50 

Gertrude Moriarity 3.00 

Mrs. S. M. Bourdon 65.00 

Marion Chandler 2.50 

Sup erin tend en t 

O. A. Morton 1,700.00 

Office and traveling expense 351.12 

Attendance Officer 

A. R. Breor 400.00 

Janitors and Operating Expense 
Prank Brehom, janitor, Academy, Main 

St. School, School St. School 2,033.30 
George Dick Kingsley, janitor Hill School 363.00 
Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor West Hatfield 

School 265.00 
Mrs. J. K. Holt, janitor North Hatfield 

School 280.00 

L. Trecartin, janitor Bradstreet School 309.75 

10 



O. E. Belden & Sons, care Bradstreet 

School Yard 15.00 

Janitor's supplies 112.03 

Amherst Gas Co., light and power 209.30 

New England Tel. & Tel Co. 75.90 

F. G. Howard 89.78 

Miscellaneous 256.78 

Fuel 

Alex Donnis, wood 32.00 

Kimball & Carey Co., coal 1,668.72 

Webster Box Co., coal 1,406.42 

North Hatfield Grain Co., coal 630.97 

Standard Oil Co., fuel oil 10.88 

Texas Co., fuel oil 9.00 

Transportation 
Boston & Maine Transportation Co., 

High school 1,020.00 

Northampton St. Ry Co., intermediate 456.75 

Repairs 

W. P. Boyle 909.94 

E. L. Graves 83.82 

Merrick Lumber Co. 126.57 

Miscellaneous 66.69 
W. H. Riley & Co., new furnace, Hill School 622.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., repairs 10.31 

New Equipment 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., sewing machine 30.00 
Text Books, Stationery and Supplies 2,820.08 

School Committee Salaries 
P. W. Mullins, chairman, 1927 saiary 75.00 

Mrs. Cora K. Graves, secretary, 1927 salary 60.00 



$51,566.36 
Unexpended Balance 1,724.58 



11 



$53,290.94 



POLICE 

Appropriation $2,800.00 

Standard Oil Co., damages to car 18.93 

A. R. Breor, refund on salary .16 



A. R. Breor, salary $2,000.16 

A. R. Breor, Exp. Tel. & Tel. 38.30 
Hatfield Garage, gas, oil, supplies and 

repairs 276.37 

Jos. Slusras, supplies 3.50 

Chase Motor Co., supplies, repairs 28.05 

Proulx & Fitzgerald, supplies, repairs 64.74 

S. M. Bourdon, gas 1.80 

John Bitner, storage for car 45.00 
Industrial Finance Corp., payments on car 113.78 

Gas and oil, a/c town 81.27 

Standard Oil Co. 3.88 

Hatfield Market, gas 1.70 

Springfield Office Supply Co. 4.57 

F. G. Howard 1.80 

Foster-Farrar Co. 1.50 

Boyle & McGlynn, insurance 27.00 

Herald Job Print 4.50 

N. Hatfield Grain Co. 6.40 

Ryan's Store 4.00 

C. D. Reese 3.83 

Chilson's Auto Top Shop 8.25 

City of Northampton, lockup fees 11.00 

J. L. McGrath, police duty - 33.00 

Herman Harris, police duty 5.00 

Geo. Newman, police duty 5.00 

Geo. Deinlein, police duty 5.00 

S. W. Kingsley, police duty 5.00 

John Raff a, police duty 5.00 

Whitcomb's Cash Grocery, gas and oil 21.89 

12 



$2,819.09 



Wm. Thayer, gas and oil 3.70 



Unexpended balance 4.10 



THEE WARDEN 



Appropriation 




James L. McGrath, tree warden 


$135.40 


Wm. Kingsley, labor 


67.20 


Charles Pelissier, labor 


56.70 


Thomas McGrath, labor 


52.50 


John Ondras, labor 


66.54 


Allen K. Smith, labor 


27.85 


P. Malinoski, labor 


14.70 


Tony Malinoski, labor 


13.40 


Thos. Malinoski, labor 


1.40 


J. Brennan, labor 


1.75 


Jo. Parent/ labor 


1.05 


S. Jablonski, labor 


.70 


H. Wickles, filing saws 


5.50 


H. D. Smith, use of power saw 


7.50 


Hatfield Garage, use of truck 


7.50 


F. G. Howard, supplies 


3.55 


Chas. Eberlein, repairs 


1.25 


Foster-Farrar Co., supplies 


3.25 


F. Vollinger, labor 


2.00 


Chester Fox, labor 


6.20 




$475.94 


Unexpended balance 


124.06 



MEMORIAL DAY 



$2,819.09 



$600.00 



$600.00 



Appropriation 125.00 

S. Micha Band 80.00 

S. W. Kingsley Wreaths 12.00 

13 



F. G. Howard Flags 20.00 



$112.00 
Unexpended balance 13.00 



125.00 



MEMORIAL HALL 

Appropriation $ 200.00 



North Hatfield Grain Co. $96.62 
Kimball & Carey Co. 19.00 
F. G. Howard 3.40 
V. H. Keller, Janitor 75.00 




$194.02 
Unexpended balance 5.98 


200.00 

840.00 
840.00 


SMITH AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Appropriation $ 
Smith Agricultural School 


SNOW REMOVAL EQUIPMENT 

Appropriation $ 
Four Wheel Drive Ayto Co. $3,600.00 
Unexpended balance 1,400.00 


5,000.00 

5,000.00 

4,400.00 
4,400.00 

200.00 
200.00 


STREET LIGHTS 

Appropriation $ 
Amherst Gas Co. 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

Appropriation 

Dr. Bonneville $100 

Dr. Byrne 100 

$ 



14 



SCHOOL HOUSE NOTE & INTEREST 

Appropriation $ 2,495.00 

Northampton Nat Bank Note No 28 $2,225.00 

Northampton Nat Bank Interest 270.00 

$ 2,495.00 

BONDS TOWN OFFICERS 

Appropriation 
Boyle & McGlynn 
Unexpended balance 



$ 


210.00 


202.50 




7.50 




$ 


210.00 


$ 


CEMETERIES 




$ 


100.00 


3.90 




43.00 




10.00 




$56.90 




43.10 




$ 


100.00 


$ 


AID TO AGRICULTURE 




$ 


150.44 




150.00 



Appropriation 
E. L. Graves 
H. Pellam 
Eugene Strong 



Unexpended balance 



Appropriation 

W. M. King, Treas 



GAS & OIL ACCOUNT 

Gas & Oil purchased 
Texas Co $ 443.45 

Gas & Oil sold 
Highway Department $239.75 

Police Department 118.27 

Gas & Oil on hand 85.43 

— . $ 443.45 

15 



INSURANCE 






Appropriation 
Howard & Woodward 


$ 
$848.93 


1,000.00 


Unexpended Balance 


151.07 


1.000.00 




<P 


INTEREST 






Appropriation 

Northampton National Bank 

Over drawn 


$ 
$3,109.76 

$ 


3,000.00 
109.75 


INSPECTION OF BARNS, ANIMALS & SLAUGHTERING 


Appropriation 

Fred T. Bardwell. Inspector 


$ 


300.00 
300.00 


MOTH WORK 






Appropriation 
James L. McGrath 


$ 
$18.25 


150.00 


Wm. Kingsley 
Charles Pelissier 


9.25 
9.25 




Thos. McGrath 


9.25 




John Ondras 


9.25 





$51.75 
Unexpended balance 98.25 



LIBRARY 



150.00 



Appropriation $ 850.00 

Ellen A. Waite Sal Librarian $203.75 

Ellen A. Waite Extra Work 45.00 

Ellen A. Waite Supplies, postage & exp 6.44 

Margaret Whalen Assistant Librarian 53.40 

Katherine Mullaney, Assistant Librarian 40.00 

Dorothy Allair, Assistant Librarian 32.40 

16 



Carrie C. Cutter, Branch Library and 

Magazines 30.00 

Mrs. Kacinski, Branch Library 1927 a/c 6.00 

Sherwood's Books 302.25 

Library Book House, Books 69.34 

H. R. Hunting Co., Books 13.62 

School Arts Magazine 3.00 

Dept. Public Safety 5.00 

Demco Co. 4.84 

Gaylord Bros. 4.80 

M. H. Dwight, repairs 2.00 

American Library Assn. 2.00 

Amherst Gas Co. 26.16 



$850.00 



POOR 



Appropriation 




Mothers' Aid 


$810.00 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


319.27 


Cooley Dickinson Hospital 


14.00 


Overland Garage, Ambulance service 


8.00 


Treasurer Hampshire County 


65.74 


Beaven-Kelly Home 


315.00 


City of Holyoke 


1,483.21 


Police Dept. Exp. 


5.45 


City of Northampton 


355.59 


Town of South Hadley 


91.74 


Dr. Fallon 


12.00 


Dr. Byrne 


12.00 


Dr. Murphy 


8.00 



$3,500.00 



$3,500.00 



HIGHWAYS, SIDEWALKS, SEWERS & BRIDGES 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Received from: 

Hampshire Implement Co., use of truck 4.00 
John Fortsch, grading job 51.90 

17 



JOT 26.00 

John McHugh. labor 4.00 

Town of Deerfield. Labor 37. 35 



S12.I23.25 



The Barrett Co.. Tarvia ic road oil >'l. 724. 96 

M. J. Gleason. stone 321.76 

Gleason Bros., sione 148.15 

J. H. Lane <$: Son. Inc.. stone 218.25 

A. Donis. lumber <$: plank 341.77 

E. S. Dickinson, gravel 139.20 
N. E. Metal Culvert Co., culverts 139.68 
Howard & Woodward, insurance 1S2.8S 
M. C. Bailey & Co.. Inc.. lumber 22.00 
Hatfield Garage, repairs, gas & oil 380.34 
Fosier-Farrar Co.. supplies 49.31 

B. & M. R. R. Co.. freight 101.74 
J. M. Wentzel. superintendent 1.446.00 
P. Zima. labor 562.20 
L. Wentzel. labor 665.00 
J. T. Powers, labor 530.25 
T. Marcenowski. labor 46S.40 
H. L. Stoddard, labor 325.00 
Aleen K. Smith, labor 43.75 
Geo. Zagrodnik. truck and team 198.75 

C. H. Crafts, team 4.00 
Thos. O'Dea. labor 14.00 
S. Lavitski. labor 14.00 
C. Dolencz. labor 14.00 
K. Backiel. truck 390.95 
W. E. Boyle, teams 107.50 
Proulx 6e Fitzgerald^ repairs 

J. Fairburn. blaster, push brooms 3.98 

M. Brennan. sand 5.30 

N xrthampton Maeh. & Welding Co.. 12.00 

F. T. Bardwell. team >.00 
F. Vollinger. Team and tractor 75.75 
M. W. Boyle, care of common 25.00 

18 



E. A. Ryan, team 8.00 
S. H. Field, stone 10.00 
Ryan's Store, supplies 16.07 
N. Hatfield Grain Co.. coal and cement 57.11 
John King, filing saws 2.25 
Electric Service Co., supplies 2.25 
Hampshire Implement Co., repairs 6.50 
Reo Garage, repairs 109.03 
Tar Products Co., tar 103.55 
La Vetrie Bros., repairs 5.00 
J. Ondras, labor 26.25 
S. S. Dwight, express 3.55 
A. Klekot, sand 2.70 
Wm. Kingsley, labor 15.75 
J. Parent, labor 7.70 
C. Ziexulewicz, truck 55.00 
Porter McLeod Mch. Wks., repairs 4.06 

F. L. Betsold, repairing bridge 78.50 
Mrs. J. T. O'Dea, sand 2.20 
A. Rogaleski, truck 30.00 

G. Eberlein, repairs 4.30 
Gas and oil. a/c Town 239.75 
LaFleur Bros., repairs 59.57 
John Zapka, labor 14.00 
John Bucala, labor 14.00 
Buffalo Springfield Roller Co., repairs 27.87 
S. W. Kingsley, sand 16.80 
T. Jandzinski, labor 4.25 
Webster Box Co., lumber .90 

E. L. Graves, repairs 38.19 

F. G. Howard, supplies 21.75 
C. L. Belden. labor 2.00 
Norwood Engineering Co., repairs 3.50 
Geo. Cruickshank. repairs 1.00 
Edward Tobaco, labor 1.75 
J.J. Betsold. gravel 34.00 
A. R. Breor, exp. col. account 4.95 

19 



Springfield Auto Body Welding Co., 

repairs, snow plow 
M. H. D wight, team 
Northampton Iron Works, catch basins 
W. H. Riley & Co., repairs 
Reg. Motor Vehicles, Reg. trucks 
Jas. Coff'ey, gravel 
Mrs. L. Doppman, stone 
E. W. Strong, gravel 
Mrs. L. H. Kingsley, 

Sand and use of dump lot 
Henry S. Labbee, repairing snow plow 



Unexpended balance 



45.00 
56.00 
37.00 
1.69 
4.00 
12.00 
25.00 
30.60 

13.10 
46.55 



$10,179.48 
1,943.48 



$12,123.25 



The cost of snow removal on highways and sidewalks 
included in the above to the amount of $236.55. 

CHESTNUT STREET ROAD 

Appropriation- — Town 
Appropriation — County 



$3,000.00 
500.00 



:,500.00 



M. J. Gleason, stone $1,072.98 

The Barrett Co., Tarvia 555.00 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co., culverts 143.33 

E. L. Dickinson, gravel 81.80 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile 42.00 

Northampton Iron Works, catch basins 9.25 

N. Hatfield Grain Co., coal and cement 63.36 

Webster Box Co., stakes .80 

A. H. Beers, survey 14.00 

J. M, Wentzel, superintendent 178.00 

Leonard Wentzel, labor 115.50 

H. L. Stoddard, labor 136.50 

J. T. Powers, labor 38.50 

P. Zima, labor 92.75 



20 



T. Marcenowski, labor 




59.50 


John Zapka, labor 




84.00 


J. Bucala, labor 




52.50 


J. Jandzinski, labor 




99.75 


K. Baekiel, truck 




120.00 


Howard Wolfram, truck 




156.25 


G. Zagrodnik, truck 




80.00 


F. Vollinger, labor and 


team 


27.95 


Charles Morrell, labor a] 


ad team 


56.00 




3,279.72 


Unexpended balance 




220.28 



$3,500.00 



FLOOD DAMAGE 

Balance on hand, January 1st, 1928 
Warner Bros., filling washout, Bridge Rd. $3,015.50 

Laviter Bros., supplies 6.00 

Wm. L. Belden, committee exp. to Boston 50.00 

J. C. Ryan, committee exp. to Boston 50.00 

W. H. Dickinson, committee exp. to Boston 50.00 



Unexpended balance 



>3,171.50 
2,186.99 



$5,358.49 



$5,358.49 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation 

Paul E. Balise, salary as Chief $150.00 

Hatfield Garage, storage, fire truck 120.00 

Hatfield Garage, repairs and new parts 126.50 

Hatfield Garage, gas, oil, labor 43.14 

Pioneer Rubber Co., hose 191.10 

John Marlow, Chief, N. F. D. 15.00 

Larkin Mfg. Co., supplies 15.58 

Howard & Woodward, insurance 18.64 

Ryan's Store, supplies 7.75 

21 



$900.00 



F. G. Howard, supplies 
Sidney G. Carl, service as fireman 
*John Small, service as fireman 
Allen K. Smith, service as fireman 
Charles Winters, service as fireman 
Thos. Wickles, service as fireman 
John Wentzel, service as fireman 
Arthur Balise, service as fireman 
Henry Pellam, service as fireman 
Joseph Parada, service as fireman 
Leon Harris, service as fireman 
Geo. Zagrodnik, service as fireman 
Thos. O Dea, service as fireman 
Joseph Smith, service as fireman 
John Raffa, service as fireman 
Michael Gogle, service as fireman 
Alva Kent, service as fireman 
O. Belden, service as fireman 
T. Toczko, service as fireman 
H. Labbee, service as fireman 
M. Yarrows, service as fireman 



Unexpended balance 



.*5 

29.20 

16.00 

26.70 

6.50 

7.50 

7.20 

9.50 

12.00 

15.70 

4.00 

6.00 

15.70 

15.70 

5.00 

4.00 

4.00 

2.00 

7.00 

4.72 

4.00 



$890.58 
9.42 



$900.00 



CONTINGENCIES 

Appropriation 

Amherst Gas Co., Town Hall lights $10.90 

Dept. Corp. & Taxation, approval of notes 16.00 

Mrs. Dehey, postage and envelopes 73.02 

New England Tel & Tel., office phone 40.40 

Herrick Foote, dog tags 5.87 

Metcalf Printing Co., office supplies 44.50 

Fred Jubenville, stamping and inspecting 20.80 

P. B. Murphy, office supplies 6.00 

E. L. Graves, repairs, M. H. 3.27 

22 



$1,000.00 



H. Pellam, Jan. T. H. 15.00 

H. S. Gere & Sons, Inc.. advertising 3.47 

Dr. Bonneville, return of births 8.75 

Mass State Prison, brushes 2.24 

M. H. Dwight, assessors' exp. 8.77 

Anker Printing Co., town reports 128.00 

Anker Printing Co., supplies 22.75 

Assessor Auto Tax List, rate book 5.00 

Wakefield Item Press, supplies 2.00 

W. & L. E. Gurley, sealer's supplies 23.27 

Flax Mfg. Co., supplies 2.00 

Chas. H. Chase, deed reports 13.80 

Schukert & McCarthy, repairs, add. mach. 14.88 

Henry Kugler, sawing wood, T. H. 3.38 

Hobbs & Warren, supplies 39.24 

S. S. D wight, express 1.39 

Stevens & Andre, legal services 110.00 

W. L. Graves, repairs, M. H. 34.34 

A. H. Bartley, license blanks .92 

Fred T. Bardwell, forest fire 14.95 

F. T. Mahar, typewriter 15.00 

Northampton Commercial College, supplies 11.00 

J. W. Heffernan, supplies 27.55 

H. Harris, forest fire 7.00 

D. R. Tolman, ballot box 70.00 

Foster-Farrar, repairs, M. H. 4.50 

J. L. McGrath, exp, a/c 3.25 

Margaret P. Ryan, advertisement 5.25 

H. Pellam, care town clock 25.00 

Dr. Byrne, return of births 3.50 

A. Donis, wood, T. H. 8.00 

W. P. Boyle, repairs 67,00 

F. G. Howard, supplies 6.92 

W. L. Chilson, keys 1.00 

Howard & Woodward, insurance, M. H. 37.60 

Merrick Lumber Co,, repairs 4.01 

D. J. Ryan, postage and supplies 17.54 

23 



W. H. Riley & Co., repairs 



Unexpended balance 



1.25 



$986.78 
13.22 



$1,000.00 



RECAPITULATION OF AMOUNTS PAID OUT ON 
APPROPRIATIONS 



Bonds of Town Officers 




$202.50 


Cemeteries 




56.90 


County Aid to Agriculture 




150.00 


Contingencies 




986.78 


Chestnut Street Road 




3,279.72 


Fire Department 




890.58 


Flood Damage a/c 




3,171.50 


Highways, Bridges, Sewers 


and Sidewalks 


10,179.48 


Insurance 




848.93 


Interest (Overdrawn 109.75 


) 


3,109.75 


Inspection of Barns and SI; 


nightering 


200.00 


Library 




850.00 


Moth Work 




51.75 


Memorial Day 




112.00 


Poor 




3,500.00 


Police 




2,814.99 


Schools 




51,566.36 


School Physicians 




200.00 


School House Note and Interest 


2,495.00 


Smith School 




840.00 


Snow Removal Equipment 




3,600.00 


Street Lights 




4,400.00 


Tree Warden 




475.94 


Memorial Hall 




194.02 


Salaries Town Officers 




3,017.00 



$97,293.20 



24 



Total Appropriations, February 6, 1928 $94,220.00 

Flood Damage Balance 5,358.49 

Snow Removal Equipment a/c 5.000.00 

Receipts Credited to Town Accounts 1,033.38 



$105,611.87 
Deducting Accounts Paid 97,293.20 



Balance favor of town $8,318.67 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
SCOTT HARRIS 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



25 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1929. 



Clifford L. Belden 
Frank J. Betsold 
John B. Bitner 
Roswell G. Billings 
Carleton H. Crafts 
William P. Boyle 
Edward L. Boyle 
John L. Stenglein 
Joseph Dippolt 
George A. Deinlein 
William F. Englehardt 
Ercent Godin 
Walter H. Hadley 
Herman Harris 
James L. McGrath 
Fred A. Pease 
Charles Pfiffer 
Daniel F. Riley 
Charles Slattery 
John M. Wentzel 
George O. Whitcomb 
Malcolm Crawford 
Henry Carl 
Murray B. Graves 
John C. Ryan 
Gordon Billings 
Joseph Parada 
Alexander T. Rogaleski 
John Raifa 
Edgar Field 
Thomas Nolan 
Myron H. D wight 
Howard L. Belden 

26 



Treasurer's Report 

V. H. KELLER, Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield 

Dr. 

To Balance on hand December 31, 1927 $7,293.48 

To M. H. D wight, Collector, 1924 Property Tax 383.69 

To M. H. D wight, Collector, 1925 Property Tax 1,010.97 

To M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1926 Poll Tax 8.00 

To M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1926 Property Tax 6,809.24 

To M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1927 Poll Tax 160.00 

To M. H. Dwight, Collector, 1927 Property Tax . 26,436.60 

To Dewey J. Ryan, Collector, 1928 Poll Tax 1,328.00 

To Dewey J. Ryan, Collector, 1928 Poll Tax, Int. .05 

To Dewey J. Ryan, Collector, 1928 Property Tax 55,788.77 
To Dewey J. Ryan, Collector, 1928 Property Tax, Int. 140.88 

To State Treasurer, Corporation Tax 3,031.93 

To State Treasurer, National Bank Tax 269.06 
To State Treasurer, Hannah W. Smith, 

Cemetery Fund 12.00 

To State Treasurer, Mothers' Aid 312.00 

To State Treasurer, Vocational Education 3,150.17 

To State Treasurer, School Supt. Sal Ref. 965.88 

To State Treasurer, Tuberculosis Subsidy 78.57 

To State Treasurer, Income Tax 17,880.00 

To State Treasurer, Smith-Hughes Fund 378.85 

To C. J. Larkin, Sale of School Tickets 12.09 

To Notes Payable, Note No. 48 20,000.00 

To Notes Payable, Note No. 51 5,000.00 

To J. A. Crosier, Court Fines 568.50 

K. H. Stone, Treasurer, Chestnut St. Road 500.00 

K. H. Stone, Treasurer, Dog Tax 279.06 
K. H. Stone, Treasurer, Refund Leeds 

Sanatorium a/c 192.00 

To Hampshire Implement Co., Highway Dept. 4.00 

John Fortsch, Highway Dept. 51.90 

27 



Water Dept, Highway Dept. 26.00 

John McHugh, Highway Dept. 4.00 

Town of Deerfield, Highway Dept. 37.35 

To Northampton Nat. Bank, Interest 180.38 

To License Fees, Gasoline & Alcohol Permits 10.00 

To License Fees, Slaughter Licenses 6.00 

To License Fees, Bus Drivers 2.00 

To License Fees, B. & M. Transportation Co. 30.00 

To License Fees, Northampton St. Ry. Co. 25.00 

To License Fees, Junk Dealers 64.00 

To License Fees, Fruit Dealers 16.00 

To License Fees, Bread Dealers 2.00 

To License Fees, Pool 4.00 

To License Fees, Sealer's Fees 80.56 

To License Fees, Oleo license .50 

To S. M. Bourdon, Fire Dept. Pumping . 3.75 

D. E. Holly, Highway Dept. 12.00 

W. L. Graves, Use of cement mixer 9.60 

Henry Pellam, Rent Town Hall 17.00 

Merrill Strong, Use of cement mixer 5.00 

Alex Donnis, Use of cement mixer 18.50 

M. Janos, Use of cement mixer 20.00 

Penna. Fire Ins. Co., Insurance on Town Hall 500.00 

Hartford Fire Ins. Co., Insurance on Town Hall 1,000.00 

Great American Fire Insurance Co., 

Insurance on Town Hall 1,000.00 

Laondon Lane Ins. Co., Fence damage, Cronin 14.00 

Standard Oil Co., Damage 5.00 

Gleason Bros., Inc., Use of road roller 319.26 

Fitchburg Cons. Co., Use of road roller 284.00 

Town of Whately, Tuition of school children 25.00 

City of Northampton, Tuition of school children 254.85 

Town of Deerneld, rent of road roller 64.00 

Webster Box Co., Refund on coal a/c 33.10 

Mrs. Billings, tree warden 2.80 

Jo. Winer, tree warden 5.00 

P. Zagrodnik, tree warden 2.00 

Prof. E. J. Burke, tel. tolls .45 

28 



E. A. Waite, library, sale old paper 1.25 

E. A. Waite, library fines 3.00 

Slovak Ev'l Church, sewer entrance 33.00 

John Stenglein, sewer entrance 33.00 

A. Skarzinski, sewer entrance 33.00 

Howard & Woodward, refund on Comp. policy 81.38 

City of Boston, tuition school children 182.80 

A. Yanginski, Highway Dept. 6.00 

A. B. Kent, Fire Dept. Pumping 4.37 

Gas & Oil, balance 85.43 



$156,592.48 



Cr. 

By Selectmen's Orders Paid $97,293.20 

Note No. 47 17,000.00 

Note No. 48 20,000.00 

Deposit to Memorial T. H. Fund 2,500.00 

Deposit to Hannah W. Smith cemetery fund 12.00 

County Tax, K. H. Stone, Treasurer 8,526.05 

State Tax, Treasurer Commonwealth 3,825.00 

State Highway Tax, Treasurer Commonwealth 708.00 

Auditors, Treasurer Commonwealth 121.55 

Veterans, Treasurer Commonwealth 12.28 

Miscellaneous 12.12 

Cash Balance on hand 6,582.28 



$156,592.48 

January 24, 1929 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Town of Hatfield and find them correct. Cash 
on hand $6,582.28. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, 

Auditor. 

29 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Cr. 

By cash on hand $6,582.28 

Uncollected Taxes, 1921 75.18 

Uncollected Taxes. 1925 968.46 

Uncollected Taxes, 1926 9,121.96 

Uncollected Taxes, 1927 34,315.90 

Uncollected Taxes, 1928 37,818.03 
Account due Town from the State 

Smith School Tuition 330.00 

Account due from State, Mothers' Aid 312.67 

Win. H. Morrisy 15.00 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co., digging ditch 184.50 



Dr. 

To Notes Outstanding: 

No. 46 Due March 14, 1929 $20,000.00 

No. 49 Due Feb. 18, 1929 10,000.00 

No. 50 Due March 28, 1929 15,000.00 

No. 51 Due July 26, 1929 5,000.00 

Balance due on Street Lights 42.00 
Balance due City of Northampton 

Public Welfare a/c 153.54 

Balance due Smith School, 1928 a/c 183.75 

Balance of Overlays. 1925-6 5,330.62 

Miscellaneous a/c 41.40 

Library a/c 43.12 

Balance in favor of the town 23.929.55 



$79,723.98 



$79,723.98 



30 



Tax Collector's Report 

DEWEY J. RYAN, Collector 



1928 POLL TAXES 

To Warrants $1,354.00 

To Interest Collected .05 



By Cash Paid Treasurer $1,328.05 

By Abatements 26.00 



11,354.05 



51,354.05 



Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 none 



1928 PROPERTY TAX 

To Warrants . $96,020.88 

To Interest Collected 140.88 



$96,161.76 



By Cash Paid Treasurer $55,929.65 

By Abatements 2,418.08 

$58,347.73 



Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 $37,814.03 

I have this day examined the books of Dewey J. Ryan, Tax 
Collector, and find them to be correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 

Jan. 24, 1929. 



31 



Tax Collector's Report 

MYRON H. DWIGHT, Collector 



1924 PROPERTY TAX 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 $422.42 

Interest Collected 36.45 





$458.87 




By Cash Paid Treasurer 


383.69 




Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 




$75.18 


1925 POLL TAX 






Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 




$110.00 



1925 PROPERTY TAX 
Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 $1,821.20 

Bv Interest collected 48.23 













$1,869.43 


By 


Cash Paid Treasurer 
Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 




1,010.97 










1926 


POLL 


TAX 




Uncollected Dec. 31, 


1927 






$260.00 


By 


Cash Paid Treasurer 
collected Dec. 31, 1928 






8.00 


Unc 





1926 PROPERTY TAX 
Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 $15,411.68 

To Interest Collected 544.93 



$15,956.51 
32 



$858.46 



$252.00 



By Cash Paid Treasurer 7,186.55 



Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 $8,869.96 

1927 POLL TAX 
Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 $504.00 

By Cash Paid Treasurer 160.00 



Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 $344.00 

1927 PROPERTY TAX 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1927 $49,391.96 

To Interest Collected 648.08 



$50,040.04 
By Cash Paid Treasurer $26,059.29 
By Abatements 8.78 

26.068.14 



Uncollected Dec. 31, 1928 $23,971.90 

I have this day examined the books of Myron H. Dwight, 
Tax Collector and find them correct. 

CHARLES E. WARNER, Auditor. 
Jam 24, 1929 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 





Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund 


1927 


1927 


1927 


Hannali W. Smith 


$15.00 


$4.00 


$71.48 


Augusta Wells 


16.74 


10.00 


374.96 


Oliver Warner 


2.36 


2.00 


52.52 


John H. Sanderson 


4.85 


4.00 


108.25 


Luman M. Moore 


10.37 


8.00 


231.20 


P. M. Wells 


5.65 


5.00 


125.22 


Benjamin Waite 


3.69 


2.00 


82.95 



33 



Abby Dickinson 

Silas (j. Hubbard 

Levi Graves 

Lucy L. Morton 

Charles Smith 

Lemuel B. Field 

Charlotte G. Wilkie 

Rufus H. Cowles 

Charles E. Hubbard 

Alpheus Cowles 

James Porter 

Daniel W. Allis 

J. H. Howard 

Fannie M. Burke 

Charles S. Shattuek 

Seth W. Kingsley 

E. S. Warner 

Reuben Belden 

Theodore Porter 

Charles L. Graves 

Roswell Hubbard 

Cooley D. Dickinson 

Elijah Bardwell 

Joseph D. Billings 

Memorial Town Hall. Int. 

Edward C. Billings 

Augusta Beals 

Anthony Douglas 

Received: 

J. E. Porter 
Jonathan Graves 
Hugh McLeod 
B. M. Warner. Xew Account 
Chester Hastings. Xew Account 
Lucius & Stearns Curtis. Xew 
Perpetual Care Funds Received 
Paid out Care of Lots 

V. I 
34 



4.48 


3.50 


99.90 


11.41 


4.00 


258.45 


7.15 


4.00 


161.01 


13.52 


4.00 


307.01 


5.04 


4.00 


112.51 


5.02 


4.00 


111.89 


58.75 




1,350.45 


5.11 


4.00 


117.62 


5.33 


4.00 


118.90 


4.93 


4.00 


109.57 


4.77 


4.00 


106.25 


7.79 


5.00 


174.34 


4.77 


4.00 


105.96 


4.82 


4.00 


107.39 


4.82 


4.00 


107.20 


4.75 


4.00 


106.19 


9.72 


7.00 


216.72 


5.43 




125.37 


4.66 


4.00 


103.48 


4.66 


4.00 


103.52 


4.64 


4.00 


102.92 


5.81 


5.00 


128.82 


15.70 


4.00 


357.01 


4.61 


4.00 


102.45 


176.35 


*2,500.00 


6.557.94 


28.56 


20.00 


584.06 


4.71 


4.00 


104.40 


4.03 




56.73 


5.32 


4.00 


101.32 


3.40 


3.00 


1C0.40 


5.72 


4.00 


101.72 
202,25 
100.00 


Account 




258.08 
152.50 
152.50 


H. KELLER. Treasurer. 



Police Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31st, 1928, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1928 76 

Drunkenness 12 

Violation of Liquor Laws 6 

Larceny 5 

Motor Vehicle Violations 22 

Assault and Battery 2 

Hawking and peddling without a license 3 

Disturbing the Peace 5 

Vagrancy ~ 3 

Cruelty to animals 2 

Begetting illegitimate child 1 

Violation of school laws 2 

Dogs not licensed 2 

Committed to State Farm , 2 

Committed to State Hospital 2 

Return to State Hospital 2 

Returned to Veterans' Hospital 5 

Total 76 

Total Fines, District Court $1505.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 

35 



Town Clerk's Report 

VITAL STATISTICS 1928 
BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 

Male Female 



January 

February 

March 


1 

1 



5 
1 


April 
May 


2 
3 




3 


June 


2 


4 


July 


3 


2 


August 

September 

October 


2 

3 
3 


1 
4 
1 


November 





2 


December 


3 


4 


Total 


23 


31—54 


BIRTH PLACI 


i OF PARENTS 




Fathers 


Mothers 


United States 


20 


24 


Poland 


33 


26 


Czecho-Slovakia 




1 


Germany 




1 


Canada 




2 


Italy 


1 





Total 54 54 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


88 


88 


52 


46 


47 



36 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 



January 


2 


First marraige of both 


28 


February- 


2 


Second of Groom 




2 


March 





Youngest Groom 




20 


April 


2 


Oldest Groom 




48 


May 


4 


Youngest Bride 




16 


June 


6 


Oldest Bride 




42 


July 


3 








September 


3 


Birthplace 


Groom 


Bride 


August 





United States 


26 


29 


October 


6 


Poland 


2 


1 


November 


2 


Scotland 


1 




December 





Austria 


1 





Total 



30 



Total 



30 



30 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Gore, William W. 
Sawtell, Emma Kingsley 
Harris, Burton 
Giawski, Josephine Kociela 
Markowski, Stanley 

Kulesza, 

Jablonski, Joseph 

Strong, Ralph W. 

Klimczyrk, Hendryk 

Steele, John 

Krizan George 

Barnard, Sarah Moore 

Warner, Ella Elizabeth Fitch 

Belden, William Howard 

Webber, Emma D. 

Corash, John 

Haff, Luella 



Danforth, Anna Wells 
Newman, Irene M. 
Osley, John 
Liberacki, Agnes 
Fitzgibbons, Margaret A. 

Wolosz, 

Burda, 

Osciak, Regina 

Osciak, 

Burke, Mary Mahoney 
Waite, Justin Lyman 
Wickles, Alfred Francis 

Filipek, 

Slusaz, Walter 

Proulx, Mary J. Harmell 

Stenglein, Barbara D. 



Age of oldest person deceased (female) 90 years. 

37 



DOGS LICENSED 

160 Male Dogs at $2.00 each $320.00 

23 Female Dogs at $5.00 each 115.00 



$435.00 

Less 183 fees at 20c each 36.60 

$398.40 
Paid County Treasurer $398.40 



•W 



Assessors' Report 



Value of Assessed Personal Estate 
Value of Assessed Real Estate 
Total Value of Assessed Estate 
Value of Assessed Buildings 
Value of Assessed Land 



$426,352.00 
$2,574,301.00 
$3,000,653.00 
$1,553,810.00 

1,020,491.00 

$2,574,301.00 



Number of Polls Assessed 673 

Residents Assessed on Property 601 

Non-Residents Assessed on Property 59 

Number of Persons Assessed on Property 764 

For Poll Tax Only 267 

Rate of Tax per $1,000.00 $32.00 

Number of Horses Assessed 315 

Number of Cows Assessed 271 

Number of Neat Cattle Assessed 94 

Number of Sheep 323 

Number of Fowls 3166 

Number of Dwelling Houses 463 

Acres of Land 9050 

State Tax $3,825.00 

State Highway Tax $708.00 

County Tax $8,526.05 

Town Tax $109,220.00 

State Audit $121.55 

Overlayings $575.19 
Estimated Receipts: 

Bank and Corporation Tax $3,150.00 

Income Tax $13,091.00 

All Others $9,430.00 
Value of Property Exempt from Tax under Chap. 

39 



59, General Laws: 

Church Property $54,700.00 

Town Property $257,075.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON H. DWTGHT, 
VERNET H. KELLER, 
JOHN E. RAFFA. 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



40 



Water Commissioners , Report 



Receipts for 


1928 




Balance on deposit, First National Bank, 




Jan. 1, 1928 




$4,885.09 


Elwell & Chenet 




16.00 


E. W. Strong, water rents 




5,870.82 


Interest, bank balance 




182.29 


. 




$in qsh, *>n 




tplUji/O^.^U 


Paid Out, 1928 




F. M. Crittenden, water bills 




$13.00 


B. & M. R. R. Co., Freight on pipe 




127.48 


U. S. Cast Iron Pipe Co., pipe 




684.82 


L. A. Deinlein, laying pipe 




516.96 


K. B. Noble Co., tools 




100.00 


Jos. Pollard & Co., tools 




„ 9.70 


E. L. Graves, repairs 




25.36 


Highway Dept., labor 




26.0 


E. W. Strong, collector 




176.08 • 


E. W. Strong, extra work 




279.70 


R. A. Slocomb, supplies and labor 




60.69 


Northampton Mach. & Welding Co., 


repairs 10.50 


Northampton Water Dept., supplies 


and 




labor 




352.12 


Norwood Engineering Co., supplies 




73.20 


W. H. Riley & Co., supplies 




57.00 




$2,512.61 


Balance on deposit, First Nat. Bank 




$8,441.59 
$10,954.20 



41 



Assets 

Cash on deposit, First Nat. Bank $8,441.59 

One Liberty Bond, 1,000.00 

Amherst Savings Bank 2,135.03 
Hampshire County Trust Co., 

Savings Dept. $2,186.17 

First Nat. Bank, Savings Dept. 1,376.45 
Northampton National Bank, 

Special account 2,698.62 



$17,837.86 

The past year we laid a 6-inch pipe from Strong's Corner 
south on the state road to the David Curtis place, leaving now 
only one street in town without a big pipe. 

On our water-shed we have been cleaning out the undesir- 
able timber such as gray birch, poplar and dead trees and are 
planning to replace wherever necessary with pines. 

We are doing this to do away just so far as is possible with 
all FIRE HAZARDS and to give the good trees a better chance 
to grow. 

In a few years we hope to have a forest all over our water- 
shed that will be worth going to see. 

J. W. KILEY, 
R. G. BILLINGS, 
L. A. DEINLEIN, 

Water Commissioners. 



42 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

There were added to the Library during 1928, 404 books, 
22 of these were gifts, 167 were purchased for the Juvenile de- 
partment. Some one has said, "Give a child a library card and 
you have placed the world at his feet." 

The circulation of books and magazines was 15,776. This 
is the largest circulation in the history of this Library, being 
2,311 more than last year. The circulation in. the adult depart- 
ment was 8,591, in the Juvenile department 7,185. 

The following is a partial list of books added during 1928: 



Adams 

Aldrich 

Anonymous 

Barrington, E. 

Balfour 

Bailey 

Bojer 

Burt 

Cannon 

Chapman 

Chalmers 

Christie 

Cockrell 

Cottrell 

Curwood 

Daingerfield 

D arrow 

Dell 

Deeping 

Comstock 

Forster 



Rogues fall out 

A Lantern in her hand 

Miss Tiverton goes out 

The Divine Lady 

The Enterprising Burglar 

Silver Slippers 

The Great Hunger 

Cock's Feathers 

Red Rust 

The Happy Mountain 

April and Sally June 

Mystery of the Blue Train 

The Hinge of Heaven 

The Singing Gold 

The Plains of Abraham 

That Gay Nineties Murder 

The Figured Flame 

Peggy by Request 

Old Pybus 

Penelope's Web 

A Passage to India 



43 



Galsworthy 

Gibbs 

Gregory 

Grey 

Grey 

Hamsun 

Hargraves 

Hart 

Henderson 

Hurst 

Jackson 

Kelland 

Kyne 

Lane 

Leech 

Lilly 

Lincoln 

Locke 

Lutz 

Lutz 

McLeod 

McCutcheon 

McGrath 

Marshall 

Miller 

Morse 

Nicholson 

Moresby 

Norris 

Oemler 

Ostenso 

Parrish; Anne 

Pedler 

Richmond 

Rinehart 

Rosman 

Sabatini 

Singmaster 



Swan Song 

Harness 

Red wood and Gold 

Nevada 

Wild Horse Mesa 

Growth of the Soil 

The Cabin at the Trail's End 

The Bellamy Trial 

The Golden Bees 

A President is Born 

Beggars can choose 

Knuckles 

Tide of Empire 

Cindy 

The Feathered Nest 

The Seven Sisters 

Silas Bradford's Boy 

The Kingdom of Theophilus 

Crimson Roses 

The New Name 

Marloe Mansions Murder 

Blades 

The Changing Road 

The Far call 

Welcome Home 

En Garde 

Cavalier of Tennessee 

Captain Java 

The Foolish Virgin 

Sheaves 

The Dark Dawn 

All Kneeling 

The Bitter Heritage 

At the South Gate 

Two Flights Up 

The Window 

Trampling of the Lilies 

What everybody wanted 



44 



Snaith 

Tarkington 

Turnbull 

Van Dine 

Vaughan 

Wentworth 

Went worth 

Walsh 

White 

Walpole 

Walling 

Ward 

Wallace 

Whitlock 

Wilder 

Willsie 

Skyward 

Richard Byrd 

Merz 

Gaylord 

Andre Maurois 

Harry Lauder 

Will Irwin (presented) 

West 

Skeyhill 

Wright' 

Fife 

Clark and Quigley 



Surrender 

Claire Ambler 

The Handsome Man 

The Green Murder Case 

The Invader 

Anne Belinda 

Will o' the Wisp 

While rivers run 

David Strange 

Winter's moon 

That dinner at Bardolphs 

The Singing Heart 

The Black Abbott 

Big Matt 

The Bridge of San Luis Rev 

With Malice toward none 

Richard Byrd 

Skyward 

The Great American Band Wagon 

Furniture yesterday and today 

Disraeli 

Roamin' in the Gloamin' 

Herbert Hoover 

Lone Scout of the Sky 

Sergeant York 

Forgotten Ladies 

Lindbergh, the Lone Eagle 

Etiquette, Jr. 



Quinn 



Exciting Adventures of Capt. John Smith 



ELLEN A. WAITE, 

Libra 



45 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1928 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Patrick W. Mullins, Chairman Term expires 1929 

Joseph F. Chandler Term expires 1930 

J. Henry Charlebois, Secretary Term expires 1931 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 
19 Bates St., Northampton Telephone 1088 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M.D. (Center and North Hatfield Schools) 
C. A. Byrnes, M.D. (Hill and West Hatfield Schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur R. Breor 



SCHOOL CENSUS 






October 


h 


1928 










Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Between 5 and 7 years 




57 


66 


123 


Between 7 and 14 




270 


275 


545 


Between 14 and 16 




65 


55 


120 



Total 392 396 788 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 
First Winter Term — 7 weeks Opens January 2, 1929 

Closes February 15, 1929 
Second Winter Term — 8 weeks Opens February 25, 1929 

Closes April 18, 1929 

49 



Spring Term — 8 weeks Opens April 29, 1929 

Closes June 21, 1929 

Fall Term — 15 weeks Opens September 9, 1929 

Closes December 20, 1929 

First Winter Term Opens December 30, 1929 

No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following Mon- 
day is observed as a holiday. 

Legal holidays in Massachusetts include January first, 
February twenty-second, April nineteenth, May thirtieth, July 
Fourth, the first Monday in September, October twelfth, Novem- 
ber eleventh, Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



50 



Report of School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield: 

The total membership in all the schools for 1926 was 739; 
for 1927, it was 762, or a gain of 23; for 1928, it was 766, or 
a gain of 4. The entering grade was 14 less than a year ago; 
and the second grade was 8 less. This would indicate that the 
crest has been reached. As the tendency is for more children 
to remain in school in the upper grades, the enrollment for the 
next five or six years is likely to remain about the same as at 
present. 

The West room at the Bradstreet School was taken over 
for the upper grades after the necessary changes were made. 
In all probability, this room will be large enough for the upper 
grades for years to come. 

There were two old furnaces at the Hill School. These 
were removed and in their place a single furnace was installed. 
The ventilation was improved and the coat rooms heated. This 
made a saving in the first cost and the present system will use 
less coal. 

The rooms on the first floor of the Center School have been 
retinted and all the furniture put in good condition. It is 
planned to treat the second floor in a similar manner this year. 
This will make the interior of this building in excellent condi- 
tion. Such repairs have been made at the other buildings as 
were necessary to keep them in good condition. 

At the close of 1927, there was an unexpended balance of 
$1,760.55. The estimated budget for 1928 was only $150.00 
less than that of 1927. However, there is an unexpended bal- 
ance this year of $1,712.49. As we have been able by rigid 
economy during the last two years to save of the estimated 
budget about $1,700, we are reducing the estimated budget for 

51 



1929, $950, and trust we will be able to keep within that esti- 
mate. Conditions may arise which may carry the expenditure 
above the estimate. The two winters up to the present have 
been comparatively mild which gave a large saving in coal. Sev- 
eral teachers moved on to better salaried positions in other 
places. These positions have been filled in most cases at the 
minimum salaries. The expenditures for repairs, books and 
supplies have been kept at a very economical level. 

As measured by Standard Tests given frequently during 
the year, it seems that our schools compare very favorably with 
other schools in this and other states. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PATRICK W. MULLINS, 
JOSEPH W. CHANDLER, 
J. HENRY CHARLEBOIS, 



52 



Financial Statement 



December 31, 1928 




Town Appropriation 


$52,900.00 


Smith-Hughes Fund 


378.85 


Expenditures 




School Committee 


$135.00 


Supt. of Schools and Attendance Officer 


2,329.36 


Supervisors of Music, Drawing and Pen- 




manship and Health Education 


2,789.96 


Teachers — Academy 


11,365.02 


Teachers — Elementary 


20,916.25 


Books and supplies 


2,971.76 


Janitors 


3,266.05 


Fuel 


3,757.99 


Repairs 


1,819.33 


Miscellaneous 


738.89 


Transportation — Academy 


1,020.00 


Transportation — Elementary 


456.75 



,278.85 



$51,566.36 
$1,712.49 



ESTIMATED FINANCIAL BUDGET FOR 1929 

School Committee $300.00 
Superintendent of Schools and 

Attendance Officer 2,500.00 
Supervisors of Music, Drawing and 

Penmanship and Health Education 2,800.00 

Teachers — Academy 11,300.00 

Teachers — Elementary 21,400.00 

53 



Books and Supplies 


3,400.00 


Janitors and supplies 


3,300.00 


Fuel 


4,000.00 


Repairs 


1,200.00 


Miscellaneous 


600.00 


Transportation — Academy 


1,000.00 


Transportation — Elementary 


500.00 




— $52,300.00 


Smith-Hughes Fund 


350.00 



Total Budget for 1929 $51,950.00 

The amount raised by the town is the above budget less 
estimated receipts from the State, tuition and other receipts. 
These amounts for 1928 were: Income Tax, $17,300.00; Tui- 
tion $463.15; Received from State toward salary and travelling 
expenses of superintendent of schools, $965.88; State reimburse- 
ment for vocational education, $3,666.76. A total of $22,395.79. 



54 



Report of Supt of Schools 



To the School Committee, Parents and Citizens: 

The general progress of the schools during 1928 has been 
uniformly good. The teachers have conducted all the work on 
a high level of efficiency and maintained a fine spirit in the 
classroom and on the playground. The teachers in this Union 
are as pleasant, loyal, cooperative and faithful as can be found 
in the Commonwealth and I wish to express at the opening of 
this report instead of at the close, my hearty appreciation of 
the untiring efforts and excellent results which they have se- 
cured along all lines. The spirit of team work which has char- 
acterized the activities of the year emphasizes the truth and 
value of the following poem by Edgar A. Guest which recently 
appeared in the Pennsylvania School Journal. 

Team Work 

It's all very well to have courage and skill 

And it's fine to be counted a star, 
But the single deed with its touch of thrill 

Doesn't tell us the man you are; 
For there's no lone hand in the game we play, 

We must work to a bigger scheme, 
And the thing that counts in the world today 

Is, How do you pull with the team? 

They may sound your praise and call you great, 

They may single you out for fame, 
But you must work with your running mate 

Or you'll never win the game; 
For never the work of life is done 

By the man with a selfish dream, 
For the battle is lost or the battle is won 

By the spirit of the team. 

55 



You may think it fine to be praised for skill, 

But a greater thing to do 
Is to set your mind and set your will 

On the goal that's just in view- 
It's helping your fellowman to score 

When his chances hopeless seem; 
It's forgetting self till the game is o'er 

And fighting for the team. 

About three years ago, we concluded that the work in his- 
tory was not quite up to a satisfactor} r standard. The attention 
of all the elementary teachers above the second grades was 
centered upon a carefully worked out system for improvement. 
A readjustment of the course of study was made, methods were 
more carefully adapted, supplementary material secured and a 
complete set of historical slides purchased. The progress has 
been checked up from time to time and found to be steadily 
gaining. 

The third and fourth grades have done excellent work. A 
Standard National Test was given in November. The fifth 
grades scored 5 points above the National Standard score; the 
sixth grades scored 3 points above; the seventh was just stand- 
ard; and the eighth slightly below. As the two upper grades 
had greater handicaps to overcome, their real progress has 
been as marked as any of the other grades. 

During the year National Standard Tests were given in 
Spelling, Arithmetic, Silent Reading, Language and English. 

In spelling the total score for all the grades above the first 
was 10 points above the total score of the National Standards 
for the same grades. 

In arithmetic the third, seventh and eighth grades were 
above standard and the fourth, fifth and sixth grades slightly 
below. 

In silent reading the ability to comprehend the meaning 
of the printed page when reading rapidly had a National Stand- 
ard rating for thousands of children in different sections of the 

56 



country of 62.8 points. The Hatfield children scored 58.9 
points. The total National score for speed in reading was 860 
points. Hatfield's total score was '799. While these marks are 
slightly below the standard, a comparison of the scores for the 
same children given last May and similar tests given in Decem- 
ber shows a steady gain in both comprehension and speed. 

Much thought and time are given to oral English in the 
lower grades and both oral and written English in the upper 
grades. The results of this work are shown whenever a Nation- 
al Standard Test in English is given. The total standard score 
of tests given in June was 225 points. The Hatfield children 
in the same grades score 243 points. The total standard score 
for those given in December was 278. The score of the Hat- 
field schools was 297 points. 

In nearly ever}^ report, I have emphasized the value of 
education. I do this to encourage our boys and girls to remain 
in school just as long as circumstances will permit. Since the 
last report, one of the most searching and thorough studies has 
been made by Professor Everett W. Lord whose conclusions are 
based on actual data. The groups studied were between twenty- 
five and sixty years of age. The average high school graduate 
in the groups studied earned $1100 a year more than the ele- 
mentary school graduate. The average college graduate received 
$3400 per year more than the high school graduate. The aver- 
age for the group ofA.B. degree men was exceeded by the group 
of M.A. men; the Ph.D. men exceeded the M.A. men; while 
those college graduates with a degree in business administration 
were highest of all, receiving nearly double that of the other 
high groups. This shows that at the present time on an average 
the more education one receives the greater is his value to him- 
self, his family and his community. It also shows that "the 
saturation point in education has not been reached and prob- 
ably never will be reached, for the increasing complexity of 
life calls for constant educational advantages," and that "the 
dollar spent for education, by the public or the individual, goes 
out only to bring back ten." 

In addressing several hundred New York educators, Ed- 

57 



ward A. Filene of Boston, made the following statements from 
the standpoint of the business and industrial leader: "Cultural 
education is as important to "business and industry as vocation- 
al education. Modern business must give preference to college 
and university men trained in scientific methods." 

"While we are contributing a great deal of money to educa- 
tion^ it is wholly inadequate. No man can run a 10-acre fac- 
tory with a five-horsepower engine. Neither can we run Ameri- 
ca's 60,000, OOO-horsepower industrial system without intelligent 
manpower., in the low as well as in the high positions." 

The above statements show that we should not handicap 
our children by reducing their local educational opportunities. 
We should give them the very best within our possibilities and 
even be willing to make real sacrifices that the} 7 may be ade- 
quately prepared for the fierce competition that they are sure 
to meet when they enter the industrial, business or professional 
world. 

Just as soon as the industrial conditions of Hatfield war- 
ranty two forward steps in education should be taken — a central 
school should be opened for those children who require for their 
best development a special type of training and an up-to-date 
Junior HigK School should be organized at the Center for all 
the seventh, eighth and ninth grade pupils in town. 

In conclusion, I wish to call your attention to the reports 
of the Principal of Smith Academy and the Supervisors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORION A. MORTON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



58 



Principal of Smith Academy 

To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee 
of the Town of Hatfield: 

My first annual report as principal of Smith Academy is 
confined to the period from September 17, 1928 to the present 
time and therefore will be rather general in nature. 

School opened September 10, under the able supervision of 
acting principal E. J. Burke. Due to his efforts and to the 
preparatory work of my predecessor the work was in full swing 
upon my arrival one week later. 

The opening registration was 87: eight seniors, twenty-two 
juniors, twenty-five sophomores, and thirty-two freshmen. Since 
that time four juniors and two sophomores have left school and 
two sophomores have entered. The present enrollment is 83. 

The attendance record so far this year is 85% as compared 
with 90% for the entire year last year. 

The subject of attendance seems to me to be a matter in 
which the utmost degree of co-operation between the home and 
the school is needed. All necessary absences should be reduced 
to a minimum and unnecessary absences should be eliminated. 

One of the problems of administration which a school the 
size of Smith Academy must face is the problem of presenting 
a school curriculum wide enough and flexible to meet the needs 
of all the types of pupils enrolled. 

Three types are in the majority: the pupil who expects to 
continue his education further, the pupil whose formal education 
ceases at the time of graduation, and the pupil who drops out of 
school before graduation. All three are equally important. 

Our courses must include subjects and subject matter of 
college grade for the benefit of pupils of the first type. 

For the second we plan a four-year-course which, when 
completed, will enable him to earn a living, and for the third 
group we plan an entirely practical course which will be of im- 
mediate value to the student regardless of the point at which he 
leaves school. 

59 



This is particularly difficult in a small school, limited as 

we are in teacher teaching hours. We endeavor to solve this 
problem in two ways. First by offering three courses of stud}?': 
college preparatory, general, and agricultural or household arts. 
Second by offering classes in practical English, applied mathe- 
matics, and applied civics. 

The athletic program is a little more comprehensive this 
year through the introduction of volley-ball for both boys and 
girls. Girls' basketball has been discontinued. 

The method of financing the chief expenses of our three 
major sports, soccer, basketball, and baseball is, to my mind, 
inadequate. The expenses incident to soccer, exclusive of balls, 
such as shoes, referees and transportation have been paid by 
means of a blanket-tax of two dollars collected from each mem- 
ber of the Smith Academy Athletic Association. This is not a 
satisfactory source of income. 

The basketball season, now weir under way, presented, nu- 
merous difficulties, namely the lack of a home floor and inade- 
quate transportation facilities. The home floor problem has been 
solved through the courtesy of Dr. Loomis of Smith's Agricul- 
tural School. Dr. Loomis has offered us the Smith School gym 
for our home games and two hours a week for practice purposes. 
Transportation has been secured through the use of private cars. 
Through this report I express my thanks and appreciation to 
the parents of the players for their generosity in loaning their 
cars. 

I would like to see the program of athletics broadened to 
include athletic facilities for the girls through the introduction 
of field hockey or some similar game. 

I suggest the installation of a shower-bath in the boys' 
room for the use of the baseball and soccer teams. 

In closing, I wish to thank the teachers and the superin- 
tendent for their co-operation in my efforts to become familiar 
with the situation at Smith Academy and in developing my pol- 
icies wherever changes seemed necessary. Except in a few items 
the customary routine of the school has been continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 
RICHARD O. BURRILL, Principal. 
60 



Music Supervisor 



Music is not for a few but for many. It has often been said 
that there are three classes of musicians, the very few who create 
music, a larger number who perform it, and the very great class 
who listen to it. Thus we endeavor to give each child in our 
public schools a technical foundation which will aid in the fur- 
ther study of music, such training as to enable the pupilto in- 
terpret, and listen to good music intelligently. 

Music is based on tone. Our consistent aim, therefore be- 
ing to develop on "ear" for a pure, beautiful tone. A series of 
tones heard successively forms a melody which is the chief char- 
acteristic of music. 

Rote song singing which begins the training of the ear, 
voice and memory, awakens and stimulates emotion, and instills 
a sense of rhythm. 

Rhythm is the most universal of the elements that consti- 
tute music and is quickly absorbed by the child. 

The third element is harmony which consists of tones heard 
in combination. 

The detail work of these three elements, melody, rhythm 
and harmony, is presented according to the grade and under- 
standing of the child. 

We are enlarging each year on our appreciation course. In 
March, Ginn & Co., of Boston sent a representative to visit our 
classes. Miss Bunting expressed herself as being much pleased 
with the progress the pupils were making in this work. We 
cannot give this branch the time we would wish to as the work 
in sight reading, word reading, chorus singing and theory must 
have a large proportion of our time. 

The musical organizations of Smith Academy, girls and boys 

61 



glee clubs, chorus and orchestra have taken an active part in 
school affairs. 

As in former years the children of all the schools of the 
town including Smith Academy furnished the chorus singing at 
the Memorial Day exercises. Although this means some sacri- 
fice on the part of the teachers, it is certainly a splendid bit of 
training in patriotism and unselfishness for our youth. 

I wish to express my hearty appreciation to the school of- 
ficials and to those teachers who give their sincerest efforts to 
the cultivation of music in our children. 

t 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



62 



Supervisor of Penmanship and 
Drawing 



The aim of the penmanship work is to teach pupils to write 
easily and well, and to establish habits of good penmanship. 

The habit of writing well is equally as important as the 
ability to write well. The time of habit formation is during the 
"carry over" work. All written work should be required to meet 
a definite standard. I think we. have gone a good way towards 
that end this year. The "carry over" work has been much bet- 
ter. The work in the lower grades has been of unusually high 
grade. 

We have done some work with the victrola during the year. 
The children enjoy it, and it is a means of securing rhythm and 
freedom of movement in the writing. 

Mrs. Griffin, visiting supervisor from the A. N. Palmer Co., 
was well pleased with the work here. 

The little booklet "Teacher's Handbook of Methods in 
Penmanship Instruction/' introduced in the schools a year ago, 
has been very helpful to many of the teachers. It states the 
aims and methods of penmanship in a veiy concise manner. It 
also gives the requirements of each grade, month by month, 
throughout the school year. 

We were late in sending our examinations for pins and cer- 
tificates this year, and for that reason we may not have so many 
as in former years. The following is the number of rewards re- 
ceived: gold star 80; silver star 20; Palmer pins 96; final cer- 
tificates 22; business certificates 5; teachers 1. 

But few changes have taken place during the past year in 
the drawing work. We have followed the same outline as in 
former years. Nature claims our attention in September and 

63 



October. Color follows for the November work and continues 
in December as a means for design on Christmas cards and gifts. 
In our midwinter work, we take up perspective and foreshorten- 
ing. Paper cutting finds a place in all grades through the year. 
There is no medium better suited for teaching form. Bv its use. 
detail is omitted, mass form is emphasized, design units are 
quickly made. etc. 

Cut paper forms are used very effectively in our poster 
work. Each grade during the year has a poster problem. There 
are few phases of school drawing that offer more interesting as 
well as more practical training, than making posters. The age 
in which we live is one of extensive advertising, a field in which 
posters hold a prominent part. 

The success of the work is due to the interest, cooperation 
and untiring efforts of Mr. Morton, principals, and teachers. 
and I take this opportunity of thanking them. 

BERXICE B. ORMOND. 



64 



Supervisor of Health Education 

To the Superintendent of Schools and Members of the School 
Committee, this report is respectfully submitted. 

The Aim of Health Education — 

To instruct children and youth so that they may conserve and 
improve their own health. To establish in them the habits and 
principles of living which throughout their school life will assure 
vigor and vitality, which provide the basis for health and service. 

Heatlh Education is concerned primarily with positive con- 
structive health building, secondly the removal of physical de- 
fects interfering with the proper functioning of mental and phys- 
ical faculties. 

A health}' child is largely unconscious of his body, it is only 
when ill or in pain is he impatient to get well. The idea of 
keeping well is more or less remote from the child's plan of 
things, and therefore must be taught. The teaching must neces- 
sarily be along practical lines and within the limit of the child's 
comprehension. The determination of what is a healthy way of 
living is based on scientific truths, even the simplest health habit, 
has its scientific basis. 

The correlation of health habit teaching with reading, spell- 
ing and poster making was well carried out in the Primary 
grades. The upper grades had daily morning inspection as well 
as a self check up on routine as outlined in the Health Crusade. 
In the intermediate and grammar rooms a more scientific method 



was used. 



A survey of general health habits and fitness according to 
the child's own knowledge was made of 800 children in the 
Union. 350 were from the Hatfield schools, including children 
of the 5th grade and the High School. 

The result of that study is given below: 
10% were below normal average weight, although many 
of this group are active and in good health. 

65 



20% had dental defects corrected during the year (the 
pupils of the Bradstreet, West and North, Hill and 
School Street rate about 50%) 

20% do not drink milk but use tea and coffee. 

30% sleep in closed rooms without open windows during 

cold weather. 
20% omit the weekly bath except in the summer time. 
10% get insufficient sleep and rest. 
2% use tobacco (grammar grades). 

The progress of the child at school depends considerably on 
health habits, the irritability and lack of attention on part of 
individual pupils match up very closely with their routine of 
living. 

In the matter of Nutrition a group of 13 children between 
the ages of 10 and 12 were selected by the report given on their 
questionnaire, they represented four nationalities, and all dif- 
ferent sizes of about the same age. The group was brought 
before the representative of the State Department of Nutrition 
andt hey made such a good appearance they will be used as 
models for one year, each child being as much as possible re- 
sponsible for their own health habits. Their general health to 
be under the supervision of school health department. 

During the summer of 1927 three children had the opportu- 
nity to spend three weeks at the Hampshire County Health 
camp in Leeds,tbis summer four children will spend four weeks 
at the health camp. 

This camp is under the direction of the Hampshire County 
Public Health Association, maintained by that association and 
the various organizations of the county. 

The correction of physical defects goes on throughout the 
year. The eyes receiving first attention. As many of the chil- 
dren have glasses only 

8 had eye defects corrected. 
10 had enlarged tonsils removed. 
249 had dental work done. 

Q6 



The Red Cross Dental Clinic operated at the North Hatfield 
school the children from West Hatfield school were transported 
for dental care. Also at the Bradstreet school. In placing the 
clinic directly in the school more children received treatment and 
the children soon lost all fear of the dental chair, and much time 
was saved. At the Centre school the children were transported 
from the Hill school, but time did not allow for all the work 
signed up at the Centre school. Effort was made to do everything 
possible for the smaller children and save the teeth, and in the 
future the clinic will care for the lower grades only except when 
a child is in distress. It was found that about 50% of the dent- 
al work done was on teeth that should have been cared for when 
in the 2nd and 3rd grade by the time they reached the 4th and 
5th grade the tooth had to be extracted. 

The following data shows the work done at the clinic: 



o. examined 


640 


Fillings 


303 


o. not needing care 


121 


Extractions 


254 






Cleaning 


29 






Treated 


8 



Total number of operations 594 

With the exception of a mild epidemic of measles and an 
occasional case of mumps the general health of the children was 
good. The greater number of days lost apart from isolation 
was caused by sore throat. A number of children need tonsils 
cared for badly. 

The school physicians apart from their regular inspection 
gave freely of their time in advising children brought to them 
from time to time all during the year and to the physicians, su- 
perintendent and teachers I am deeply indebted and appreciate 
their help sincerely. 

MARIAN HOLMES, R. N. 



67 



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Flavel M. Gifford 
Harry E. Rollins 
Edward J. Burke 
Mary E. Ryan 
Alice E. Brockway 
Ebba E. Ekberg 
Clarence J. Larkin 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Rose C. Finn 
Sarah V. Kiley 
Grace W. Bardwell 
Catherine T. Shea 
Margaret O'Donnell 
Anna M. O'Neill 
Mary E. Fenton 
Hilda V. Corman 
Lena P. Fitzgerald 
Constance B. Mullany 
Eleanor R. Whalen 
Harold L. Ford 
Margaret B. Kroll 
Mary C. Kelly 
Mary D. Donelson 
Catherine B. Harris 
Ellen O'Hara 
Kathleen Connelly 
Maude E. Boyle 
Bernice B. Ormond 
Marian Holmes Totals 


8 

8 


Smith Academy 
Hatfield Center 

Hill Grammar 
Hill Primary 
West Grammar 
West Primary 
North Grammar 
North Primary 
Bradstreet Gram. 
Bradstreet Inter. 
Bradstreet Primary 
Supr. of Music 
" of Draw. & Pen. 
" of Health Ed. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 



For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

I929 




Metcalf Printing & Publishing Co.. Northampton, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 
For Town Meeting, February 3, 1930 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables- of the Town 
of Hatfield in said County, Greetings : — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and 
town affairs to meet in Smith Academy Hall in said Hat- 
field on Monday, the 3rd day of February, next at ten 
o'oclock in the forenoon, then and there to act on the fol- 
lowing articles to wit. : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year; Moderator, Town Clerk, Three Select- 
men, One Assessor for 3 years, One Water Commissioner 
for 3 years, One member of the School Committee for 3 
years, Town Treasurer, One Trustee of the Public Library 
for 3 years, Tree Warden, Elector under the Will of Oliver 
Smith, Tax Collector, Farm Bureau Director, Six Con- 
stables, all the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for such longer 
time as the majority of the voters present shall direct but 
in no case will they be kept open after the hour of eight 
o'clock in the evening. 

Article 2. To hear the report of the various town 
officers. 

Article 3. To receive and pass on town accounts. 



4 

Article 4. To take action in relation to the payment 
of the School House Note No. 30 and interest $2,315.00 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 81 of the General Laws and raise 
and appropriate money for same. Amount recommended 

$6,900.00 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the maintenance of ordinary repairs 
on highways, sewers, bridges and sidewalks. Amount 
recommended ! $3,400.00 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the payment of the bonds of town 
officers. Amount recommended , $220.00 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money to defray the expense of Dickinson 
Memorial Hall for the ensuing year. Amount recommended 

$250.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the inspection of barns, animals and 
slaughtering. Amount recommended $300.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for Tree Warden and Moth Work. 

Amount recommended for Tree Warden $600.0 

for Moth Work 400.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the maintenance of the Fire De- 
partment. Amount recommended $1,300.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for insurance. Amount recommended 

$2,050.00 

Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for unclassified expenses. Amount recom- 
mended * $800.00 



Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of the poor for the ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $2,500.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for interest. Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate the following amounts for salaries and expenses of 
town officers for the ensuing year: 

Salaries, Selectmen $300.00 Expenses $100.00 

Salary, Town Treasurer 600.00 Expenses 20.00 

Salary, Town Clerk 500.00 Expenses 90.00 

Salary, Clerk Board, Selectmen 100.00 
Salary, Town Accountant 800.00 

Salary, Tax Collector 1% of entire levy 

estimated at 750.00 Expenses 80.00 

Salary, Assessors 850.00 Expenses 25.00 

Salary, Sealer of Weights and 

Measures 150.00 Expenses 50.00 

Salary, Election Officers and 

Registration 180.00 Expenses 30.00 

Expenses of the Safety Committee 300.00 

Amount recommended for salaries $4,230.00, Epx. $695.00 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the maintenance of the schools for the 
ensuing year. Amount recommended $54,000.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the employment of one or more school 
psysicians for the ensuing year. Amount recommended 

$200.00 

Article 19. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of the cemeteries. Amount rec- 
ommended $100.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for Memorial Day. Amount recommended 

$125.00 



Article 21. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the Public Library. Amount recommend- 
ed $1,100.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of the tuition of Hatfield 
students at Smith's Agricultural School. Amount recom- 
mended $700.00 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for police protection. Amount recom- 
mended $2,800.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for street lights. Amount recommended 

$4,586.00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for reserve fund. Amounte recommended 

$500.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate money for fighting forest fires. Amount recommended 

$150.00 

Article 27. To see if the town will raise and aj}pro- 
priate money for the improvement of the Bradstreet De- 
pot Road from the foot of Brennans Hill, Eastward to 
Edwin Fields corner, the amount recommended is two 
thousand dollars to be used with like amounts to be con- 
tributed by the State and County $2,000.00 

Total amount recommended $92,431.00 

The Finance Committee wish to state in regard to the 
various requests asked for in the way of improvements in 
various parts of the town, all of these can be taken care 
of without making special appropriations, if the town will 
vote to accept Article 5 of this warrant. We also find that 
the financial condition of the town has never been in better 
condition than at the present time, and they wish to recom- 



mend the building of a New Memorial Town Hall, and 
they feel that it can be financed without raising the present 
tax rate. 

JOHN C. RYAN, 
ROBERT L. BELDEN, 
WM. H. DICKINSON, 

Finance Committee. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the installing of Commercial Course 
in the High School. Amount asked for $1,500.00 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to bor- 
row money in anticipation of the revenue of the current 
financial year. 

Article 30. To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to abolish 
the office of Town Auditor. 

Article 32, To see if the town will vote to change the 
time of holding the Annual Town Meeting to later date. 

Article 33. To hear report of the Memorial Town 
Hall Committee and vote on the acceptance of same. 

Article 34. To see if the Town will raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the construction, original equip- 
ment and furnishing of a town hall, to be known as the 
Hatfield Memorial Hall; and to authorize the treasurer 
with the approval of the selectmen, to borrow any or all 
of the money so appropriated; and provide for a committee 
to supervise the construction of said building, or take any 
action thereon. 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate as follows for the construction and equipment of a 
town hall: 



8 

From Overlay Reserve $7,000.00 

From Available Water Surplus of 1929 5,998.06 

From receipts from sale of old town 

hall site 500.00 

From Surplus War bonus 1,339.41 



$14,837.41 

Article 36. To see if the town will appropriate a 
sum of money from the Insurance account and Truck and 
Roller earnings to construct a new tool house for the use 
of the highway department, amount in the two accounts. 

$3,880.34 

Article 37. To see if the town will vote to appro- 
priate a sum of money for water department expense, from 
the available water revenue of 1928 and prior. Amount 
asked for $5,000.00 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting attested copies thereof in five public places in said 
town seven days before time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of January in the 
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirty. 

JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
JOSEPH PORADA, 
DANIEL P. SHEEHAN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen: 

Herewith is submitted the first annual report of the 
town accountant. It includes a statement of the cash 
receipts and payments of the town; showing the source and 
nature of the receipts and the purpose of the- payments; a 
table showing appropriations; transfers, expenditures arid 
balances of the appropriation accounts, as well as a balance 
sheet showing the financial condition of the town on Dec- 
ember 31, 1929. 

The report is considerably different from former re- 
ports but conforms closely to the state system of account- 
ing adopted by vote of the town and installed in 1929. 
The fact that the method of carrying on business was new, 
added to the fact that the appropriations as made, did not 
conform to the requirements of the system have created 
some slight difficulty this year but it is hoped that the 
method of making appropriations will be changed and that, 
as the voters become more familiar with the new method 
of doing business, the difficulties will be minimized. 

The system being followed requires all bills to be pre- 
sented to the department which incurs them for approval, 
after which bills are transmitted to the town accountant 
who places them on a warrant, to be paid by the treasurer, 
after the approval of the selectmen is obtained. No other 
person than the treasurer may pay bills, and the treasurer 
may pay only such bills as are submitted to him on a prop- 
erly approved warrant. 

It is obvious that a sufficient length of time must elapse 
after the bill is presented and before it is paid, to permit 



10 



the necessary procedure to be followed. The balance sheet 
shows the town to be in excellent financial condition. 



Respectfully submitted. 



VERNET H. KELLER, 

Town Accountant. 



Balance January 1, 1929 

RECEIPTS 



124,140.56 



GENERAL REVENUE 



Tax Levies, 

Previous vears 



$68,782.66 



Current year 


41,575.39 




Auto Excise 


4,005.73 




Poll 


1,304.00 






$115,667.78 


From The Commonwealth, 






Corporation Tax 


$2,423.09 




Income 


19,375.27 




Bank 


250.58 




School fund 


2,218.20 




High and Vocational 


3,145.77 




Supt. of Schools 


949.76 




Federal Aid 


434.34 






$ 


28,797.01 




<P 


License Fees, 






Bus 


$25.00 




Junk and fruit 


68.00 




Pool 


8.00 




Gas and Alcohol permits 


10.00 






<fi 


111.00 




w 


Court Fines 


$ 


348.00 


Hampshire Countv Doer Fund 


. $ 


331.50 



11 

DEPARTMENTAL 

Health and Sanatation $ 27.14 

Highways, 

Work done, use of cement mixer 



6,658.80 



etc. 


$484.80 


From State Chapter 81 


4,700.00 


Truck and roller 


1,474.00 

< 


Charities, 


« 


From other Cities and Towns 


$42.60 


State, Mothers' Aid 


312.67 


Schools, 


i 


Tuition, City of Boston 


$119.65 


Tuition, City of Northampton 


257.12 


Sale school tickets 


15.00 


Rent of grounds 


9.50 


Treas. Smith Academy 


1,000.00 


Miscellaneous, 


< 


Library fines 


$4.50 


Contingent 


10.96 


Sewer entrance (Penkoski) 


33.00 


Damage to hydrants 


50.75 


Sealer's Fees 


98.70 


Sale Town Hall Lot 


500.00 



Insurance of tools and tool house 2,406.34 
Water rents 5,998.06 



Interest, 

From taxes $4,181.15 

Deposits 759.96 



355.27 



$ 1,401.27 



9,102.31 



$ 4,941.11 



Temporary Loans, 

Anticipation of revenue $ 10,000.00 



12 



Memorial Town Hall Building Fund, 

Sale of land and buildings $2,179.66 

Interest 131.80 



2,311.46 



Trust Funds, 

Frary-Gardner Cemetery Plot $100.00 

Batchelor Cemetery Plot 100.00 

Income Hannah W. Smith 12.00 



$ 212.00 

Income Perpetual Care Funds $ 201.00 

Refunds, 

Schools, overpayment $50.75 

Police 5.00 

— ^ $ 55.75 



Transfers, 

Water bills $11.50 

Memorial Town Hall Fund 6,557.94 



$ 6,569.44 

Total Receipts $187,090.84 

PAYMENTS 

SALARIES OF TOWN OFFICERS 

Selectmen $300.00 

Treasurer 500.00 

Auditor (Town) 10.00 ' 

Town Clerk, Clerk Board Selectmen 

and Town Accountant 
Tax Collectors 
Assessors 
Elector 

Election and Registration 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Bonds, Town Officers 



1,200.00 






700.00 






740.25 






10.00 






70.00 






150.00 








$ 


3,680.25 








217.50 



13 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Salary of Chief 


$2,000.00 


Salaries of Special Officers 


114.00 


Telephone 


34.88 


Garage rent- 


35.00 


Repairs, Gas and Oil 


83.86 


Auto 


415.82 


Tires 


70.03 



2,753.59 



FIRE DEPARTMENT • 

Salary of Chief • $150.00 

Salary of Firemen 310.50 

Storage of truck 120.00 

Repairs, gas, oil and supplies 261.94 



842.44 



TREE WORK 

Salaries and wages $104.50 

Equipment 375.50 

Supplies 27.02 



$ 507.02 



MOTH WORK 

Salaries and wages $202.85 

Supplies 1.67 



$ 204.52 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS, BARNS AND STAMPING 
Salary $300.00 $ 300.00 

HIGHWAYS, CHAP. 81 

Salaries and Wages $4,088.05 

Trucks, Teams and Roller 3,792.89 



14 



Stone, Gravel 

Tar and Road Oiling 

Supplies, tools and cement 

Freight 

Culverts 



1,332.57 

2,128,99 

64.60 

10.50 

606.22 



12,023.82 



HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES, SEWERS AND SIDEWALKS 

Salaries and wages $1,198.97 

Equipment and repairs 626.06 

Gas and oil 607.90 

Lumber 254.35 

Snow Removal 292.46 

Street Signs and Markers 270.06 

Miscellaneous, freight, fuel, tile, etc. 234.18 

Insurance of truck 43.46 

$ 3,527.44 



PUBLIC WELFARE 



Relief by other Cities and Towns 


$1,204.52 


Mothers' Aid 


520.00 


Cash 


150.00 


Medical Aid 


60.00 


Provisions 


17.51 


Coal 


16.90 


Expense 


94.20 


Board and care 


61.72 




$ 2,124.85 



SCHOOLS 



General Administration 
Committee Salaries, 1928-29 
Superintendent 
Attendance Officer 
Office expense 
Stationery and printing 



$460.00 

1,700.00 

400.00 

43.08 

82.50 



15 

Telephone 81.89 

Traveling expense 220.45 

Miscellaneous 35.87 

$ 3,023.79 

Teachers 
High $10,951.75 

Elementary 24,022.90 

Vocational 272.20 

$35,246.85 



Text books and supplies 

High - $1,144.14 

Elementary 1,981.37 

— $ 3,125.51 

Tuition 

Elementary, (Continuation) $88.04 $ 88.04 

Transportation 

High $881.00 

Elementary 171.02 



Janitor Service 
High $672.00 

Elementary 2,623.81 

■ $ 3,295.81 

Fuel and Light, 
High $738.84 

Elementary 2,986.76 

— $ 3,725.60 

Repairs 
High $51.35 

Elementary 1,991.31 

$ 2,042.66* 



16 

Janitors' supplies $141.44 $ 141.44 

Furniture and furnishings $603.70 $ 603.70 

Rent, Smith School Arena $42.00 $ 42.00 

Graduation expenses $49.23 $ 49.23 



$52,436.65 

Smith's Agricultural School 

Tuition Hatfield Students $ 738.75 

LIBRARY 

Salaries 

Librarian $242.20 

Assistants 103.40 

Cataloging 60.50 

Books 292.85 

Periodicals 55.35 

Supplies ' 59.89 

Light 36.83 

$ 851.02 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Salaries of Commissioners $100.00 

Sup't and Collector 215.37 

Labor 2,722.13 

Pipe and fittings 2,504.43 

Freight 204.29 

Teams 68.00 

Seedling Pines 36.00 

Stationery and printing 101.34 

Equipment 19.75 

Miscellaneous 52.25 



CEMETERIES 
Labor $45.06 

Pipe and fittings 29.96 



$ 75.02 



17 

INTEREST 

Northampton National Bank $1,266.00 $ 1,266.68 

SCHOOL HOUSE NOTE AND INTEREST 

Northampton Nat'l Bank, note #29 $2,000.00 
Northampton Nat'l Bank. Interest 360.00 



CONTINGENT 


*v *}"»«•»« 


Office expense 


$167.70 


Town reports 


148.00 


Election expense 


37.65 


Care of Town Clock 


25.00 


Dept. Correction 


13.14 


Birth returns 


1.50 


Inspector 


21.20 


Assessors' expense 


15.23 


Sealers' expense and mileage 


50.00 


Tax Collector's expense 


78.10 


Treasurer's expense 


13.82 


Care Wilkie Lot 


3.00 


Fighting forest fires 


119.65 


Survey Old Town Hall Lot 


24.75 


Attorney's Fees 


266.10 


Damage claim (Highway) 


125.00 




$ 1,109.84 



TEMPORARY LOANS 

Loans in anticipation of revenue repaid 



$60,000.00 



ACCOUNTS PAID FROM TAXATION 

County Tax $7,758.14 

State Tax 3.825.Q0 

State Highway and Snow Rem.* 877.83 

State Audit and Installing System 1,(?55.54 

$14,116.51 



18 



STREET LIGHTS 



Amherst Gas Co. 



$ 4,560.12 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
Dr. Bonneville $100.00 



Dr. Byrne 



100.00 



200.00 



Fuel 

Janitor 

Supplies 



MEMORIAL HALL 



$112.76 

75.00 

3.95 



191.71 



MEMORIAL DAY 



Band 
Flags, etc. 



580.00 
30.00 



$ 110.00 



COUNTY AID TO AGRICULTURE 
W. M. King, Treas $ 150.00 



INSURANCE 



Memorial Bldg. 

Workman's Compensation 

Schools 

Liability 

Roller, truck and tools 



$200.00 

329.40 

119.42 

30.00 

86.54 



$ 765.36 



MEMORIAL TOWN HALL BLDG. FUND 

Pease Lot . $6,500.00 

Survey • 30.00 

Insurance 6.65 

Advertisement 9.75 

- $ 6,546.40 



19 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Interest on Trust Funds deposited $12.00 

Trust Funds, perpetual care 200.00 

Income perpetual care funds 201.00 

Motor vehicle excise refund 58.74 

Overlay 1928 3.84 

Soldiers' Exemption 1.50 

Bank Tax 1.87 



478.95 



Total Payments . $178,162.00 



Cash balance $ 33,069.40 

Note : Highway department had use of gas and oil on hand 
Jan. 1, 1929, value of $80.00. 

Police department had use of gas and oil on hand 
Jan. 1. 1929, value of $42.43. 

Police department used gas and oil shown as charged 
to highways, value $76.74. 



20 





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24 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1930 



Clifford L. Belden 
Frank J. Betsold 
John B. Bitner 
R os well G. Billings 
William P. Boyle 
Edward L. Boyle 
John L. Stenglein 
George A. Deinlein 
William F. Englehardt 
Ercent Godin 
Walter H. Hadley 
Herman Harris 
James L. McGrath 
Fred A. Pease 
Charles Pnffer 
Daniel F. Riley 
Charles Slattery 
John M. Wentzel 
Malcolm Crawford 
Henry Carl 
Murray B. Graves 
M. Larkin Proulx 
G. Raymond Billings 
Joseph Parada 
Alexander T. Rogaleski 
Charles Klekot 
Oscar E. Belden 
John Mullins 
Myron H. D wight 
Howard L. Belden 



25 



Treasurer's Report 



FRANCIS W. LOVETT, Treasurer, in account with 
TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance in Treasury Jan. 1st., 1929 $ 24,140.56 

Receipts for the year 1929 • 187,090.84 



Total $211,231.40 

Disbursements for the year 1929 178,162.00 

* 
Balance in Treasury Dec. 31st, 1929 $ 33,069.40 

Hatfield, January 20, 1930. 



I have examined the accounts of the treasurer on Jan- 
uary 20, 1930, and reconciled his bank account with a 
statement furnished by the bank. The cash is over $32.05 



GEORGE W. SEARLE, 
Examiner Division of Accounts. 



26 



Tax Collector's Report 



To Warrant $71,524.53 

By cash paid Treas., Col. and Interest 41,575.39 



Balance uncollected 1929 29,949.14 

1929 POLL TAX 

To Warrant 1,324.00 

By cash paid Treas. 1,304.00 



Uncollected % 20.00 

1929 EXCISE TAX 

To Warrant 4,907.46 

By cash paid Treas $4,005.73 

By abatements 658.94 

$ 4,664.67 



Uncollected $ 242.79 

JOSEPH YARROWS, 
* • Collector. 



27 



Tax Collector's Report 

Dewey J. Ryan, Collector 



1928 PROPERTY TAX 

To uncollected December 31, 1928 $37,814.03 

To warrant 28.13 

To interest collected 892.72 

Overpayments to Collector * .16 





$38,735.04 


By cash paid Treasurer 


$38,696.51 


By abatements 


38.53 




$38,735.04 



Uncollected December 31, 1929 None 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 




Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund 


1929 


1929 


1929 


Hannah W. Smith 


$15.45 




$86.93 


Augusta Wells 


17.04 


$10.00 


382.00 


Oliver Warner 


2.36 


2.00 


52.88 


John H. Sanderson 


4.91. 


4.00 


109.16 


Luman M. Moore 


10.51 


8.00 


233.71 


P. M. Wells 


5.69 


5.00 


125.91 


Benjamin Waite 


3.74 


2.00 


84.69 


Abby Dickinson 


4.53 


3.50 


100.93 


Silas G. Hubbard 


11.75 


4.00 


266.20 


Levi Graves 


7.31 


4.00 


164.32 


Lucy L. Morton 


13.95 


4.00 


316.96 



28 



Charles Smith 


5.11 


4.00 


113.62 


Lemeul B. Field 


5.07 


4.00 


112.96 


Charlotte G. Wilkie 


61.43 




1,411.88 


Rufus H. Cowles 


5.15 


4.00 


114.77 


Charles E. Hubbard 


5.38 


4.00 


120.28 


Alpheus Cowles 


4.97 


4.00 


110.54 


James Porter 


4.82 


4.00 


107.07 


Daniel W. Allis 


7.93 


5.00 


177.23 


J. H. Howard 


4.79 


4.00 


106.75 


Fannie M. Burke 


4.86 


4.00 


108.25 


Charles S. Shattuck 


4.86 


4.00 


108.06 


Seth W. Kingsley 


4.82 


4.00 


107.01 


E. S. Warner 


9.83 


7.00 


219.55 


Reuben Belden 


5.69 


24.00 


107.06 


Theodore Porter 


4.68 


4.00 


104.16 


Charles L. Graves 


4.68 


4.00 


104.20 


Roswell Hubbard 


4.66 


4.00 


103.58 


Cooley D. Dickinson 


5.83 


5.00 


129.65 


Elijah Bardwell 


16.24 


4.00 


369.25 


Joseph D. Billings 


4.64 


4.00 


103.09 


Memorial Town Hall, Int. 








Edward C. Billings 


29.24 


22.50 


590.80 


Augusta Beals 


4.73 


4.00 


105.13 


Anthony Douglas 


2.85 




59.58 


Received : 








J. E. Porter 


4.59 


4.00 


101.91 


Jonathan Graves 


4.55 


3.50 


101.45 


Hugh McLeod 


4.59 


4.00 


102.31 


B. M. Warner 


9.19 


4.00 


207.44 


Chester Hastings 


3.77 


3.50 


100.27 


Lucius & Stearns Curtis 


17.78 


8.00 


267.86 


Perpetual Care Funds Received 




201.00 


Paid out Care of Lots 






201.00 


Frary & Gardner, new acct. 






100.00 


Henry C. Batchellor, new acct. 




100.66 


F. 


W. LOVETT, Treasurer. 



29 



Police Report 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The report of the Police Department for the year end- 
ing December 3 1st; 1929, is herewith respectfully submit- 
ted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1929 73 

Drunkenness 14 

Violation of Liquor Laws 2 

Larceny 7 

Motor Vehicle Violations 24 

Assault and Battery 5 

Hawking and peddling without a license 2 

Dusturbing the Peace 3 

Vagrancy 2 

Cruelty to animals 

Begetting illegitimate child 2 

Violation of school laws 2 

Dogs not licensed 

Committed to State Farm 2 

Committed to State Hospital 2 

Return to State Hospital 2 

Returned to Veterans' Hospital 4 

Burning to Defraud 2 

Total 73 

Total Fines, District Court $1,475.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



30 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 1929 
BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 





Male 


Female 


January 

February 

March 


2 

2 


6 
3 
2 


April 

May 

June 


1 
2 



1 
1 
1 


July 
August 
September 
October 


1 

4 
1 
2 



1 

1 



November 


1 


1 


December 


1 


5 



Total 17 18 — 35 

BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 



I 


'athers 


Mothers 


United States 


21 


24 


Poland 


10 


9 


Czecho-Slovakia 


2 


2 


Germany 







Canada 




2 


Italy 







Total 33 35 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 

1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 

88 52 46 47 54 



31 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 



January 


1 


First marriage of both 


February 


4 


Second of Groom 


March 





Youngest Groom 


April 


1 


Oldest Groom 


May 





Youngest Bride 


June 


3 


Oldest Bride 


July 


1 


Third of Bride 


August 


1 




September 


5 


Birthplace C 


October 


2 


United States 


November 


1 


Poland 


December 





Canada 



18 
1 
18 
37 
18 
34 
1 



Total 



Groom 
15 
2 

2 



19 Total 19 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 
1929 

Kingsley,' Henry H. 



Bride 

18 

1 



19 



Mullen, James E. 
Gardocki, John 
Dannis, Mary 
Szyeh, Boleslaw 
Ziezulewicz, William 
Gendrin, Catherine C. 
Lampron, Frank E. 
Jaworowski, Zygmont 
Kacinski, Stanislaw 
Mastowicz, Seslaw 
Pasczyk, Frank 



Yarrows., 

Dippolt, Cooney G. 
Smith., Marion Proulz 
Merrick, Alfred 
Borowski, John 
Baczewski, Laura t J. 
Sanderson, Abbie B. 
Niewinski, Edmond 
Sakowicz, 



Vining, Frederick 
Age of oldest person deceased (female) 90 years, 9 
mos., 21 days. 

DOGS LICENSED 
162 Male Dogs at $2.00 $324.00 

10 Female Dogs at $5.00 each 



50.00 



Less 172 fees at 20c each 



Paid County Treasurer 



374.00 
34.40 



339.60 
,339.60 



32 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The past year 1929 has been one of extension and 
improvement in our water system. 

We have laid new mains on Chestnut St. and Porter 
Place in Hatfield and from Fields corner to the foot of the 
hill on the plain road in Bradstreet all of which pipe was 
put in to; replace one and two inch pipe which formerly^ 
served these streets there by giving about a dozen pieces 
of property fire protection. 

We have also continued the work started last year 
on our water shed by cleaning up the brush and dead 
wood also wild current and gooseberry bushes which are 
the cause of the blister rust on our pines. 

It has been very gratifying to all of us to see the way 
in which our supply held out during the dry spell last sum- 
mer. We were one of the few towns in the state that did 
not have to curtail their users. 

J. W. KILEY, 
R. G. BILLINGS, 
L. A. DEINLEIN. 



33 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed buildings $1,553,261.00 

Value of assessed land 987,604.00 

Value of assessed real estate 2,537,515.00 

Value of assessed personal estate 208,146.00 
Value of assessed real and personal estate 2,745,661.00 

Rate of Tax per $1,000.00 $26.00 

Number of polls assessed 662 

Number of persons assessed on property 551 

Number of horses assessed 298 

Number of cows assessed 259 

Number of neat cattle assessed 54 

Number of sheep assessed 383 

Number of fowl assessed 1,114 

Number of Dwelling houses assessed 465 

Number of automobiles assessed 628 

Number of acres of land assessed 9,050 

State Tax $3,825.00 

State Highway Tax 708.00 

State Audit Tax 1,655.54 

State Snow Removal Tax 169.83 

County Tax 7,758.14 

Overlayings 1,677.74 

Town Tax 89,355.00 

Addition to Warrant 137.28 

Estimated Receipts: 

Corporation Tax $3,000.00 

Bank Tax 250.00 

Income Tax 17,300.00 

Licenses 240.00 

Fines 325.00 

Highways 2,000.00 



34 

Schools 4,500.00 

Excise Tax 3,864.00 

All others 959.06 

Value of Property Exempt from taxation under 
Chap. 59, General Laws: 

Church property $ 68,000.00 

Town property 257,000.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery 3,500.00 

Smith Academy 66,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

MYRON H. DWIGHT, 
JOHN R. McGRATH, 
JOHN E. RAFFA, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



35 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustee'? of the Public Library: 

I take pleasure in submitting to you niy thirteenth 
annual report. During these thirteen years the patronage 
of the library has been steadily growing. The circulation 
has increased from 6.411 in 1917. when my rirst report 
was given, to 16,891 during 192 

The town has always been generous in appropriating 
the amount of money asked for. The last increase in ap- 
propriation was. I think, in 19 22. Then rhe circulation 
was 13,188. This year during the month of November 
over 2.000 books went out. 

This increase mean? that more new books are needed 
and that many worn out copies need to be replaced. 

We stand greatly in need of a larger appropriation 
for next year 424 books have been added to the library 
during 1929. Of these 1S9 were for the juvenile depart- 
ment 

I wish to express my appreciation of the encourage- 
ment and cooperation given me by the Trustees, and in 
particular my gratitude to Mrs. Thomas Mullany. who ha< 
so admirably served as Librarian during my absence :: 
the winter months; also for the loyalty and helpfulness of 
my assistants. Dorothy Allaire and Katherine Howard. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ELLEN A. WA1TE. 

Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1929 



87 



39 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joseph F. Chandler, Chairman Term expires 1930 

J. Henry Charlebois, Secretary Term expires 1931 

Frances W. Lovett Term expires 1932 

\ SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 
19 Bates St.,, Northampton Telephone 1088 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M.D. (Center and North Hatfield Schools) 
C. A. Byrnes, M.D. (Hill and West Hatfield Schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Chief Arthur R. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 
Oct. 1, 1929 





Boys 


Girls 


Tota 


Between 5 and 7 years 


62 


62 


124 


Between 7 and 14 years 


253 


259 


512 


Between 14< and 16 


60 


69 


129 



Totals 375 390 765 



40 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy- 
First Winter Term — 7 weeks Opens December 30, 1929 

Closes February 14, 1930 

Second Winter Term — 8 weeks Opens February 24, 193d 

Closes April 18, 1930 

Spring Term — 8 weeks Opens April 28, 1930 

Closes June 20, 1930 

Fall Term — 15 weeks Opens September 8, 1930 

Closes December 19, 1930 

Winter Term Opens December 29, 1930 

No school on legal holidays and Good Friday. 
Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week 

and reopen the following Monday. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following 

Monday is observed as a holiday. 

Legal holidays in Massachusetts include January first, 
February twenty-second, April nineteenth, May thirtieth, 
July Fourth, the first Monday in September, October 
twelfth, November eleventh, Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



« 



Report of School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield : 

The total membership of all the schools for 1926 was 
739; for 1927, it was 762, or a gain of 23; for 1928, it was 
766, or a gain of 4 ; for 1929, it was 740, or a loss of 26. 
The entering grade last September was 93 or a gain of 26 
over the year before which makes up the loss. The crest 
of the increase which occurred several years ago is now 
in the fifth, sixth, and seventh grades. This increase will 
begin to reach the Academy in 1931, when the size of the 
freshmen class will be more than doubled. 

Because of the agricultural conditions in the Connecti- 
cut Valley during the last few years, the school depart- 
ment has economized at every point, saving $1760 of the 
regular budget in 1927; $1712 in 1928; and reducing the 
1929 budget $.1000. No new historical or political maps 
have been purchased since the World War changed the 
whole map of Europe and caused many readjustments in 
other countries. We are using the same textbook in arith- 
metic that was introduced some ten or twelve years ago. 
Strange as it may seem to those who studied arithmetic 
thirty years ago, the Superintendent of Schools says that 
more advancement has been made in the kind of material 
used and the methods employed in arithmetic than almost 
any other branch in the elementary schools. The textbook 
in use has been supplemented by placing in the hands of 
the teachers the newer textbooks with which they have 
tried to bring the work in this branch up to date. A mod- 
ern book should be introduced and copies supplied in Sept- 
ember to the children in the third, fifth and seventh grades. 

For a series of years, the expenditure for each child 
enrolled in the schools has been much less than the average 



42 

in all the towns in the State of similar population and valu- 
ation, and below the cost in adjoining towns in the Valley. 

According to the last State Report the figures are as 
follows: Holden, $98.79; Kingston, $92.42; Medfield, 
$88.74; Hanover, $85.55; Hopkinton, $85.50; Pepperill, 
$84.94; Medway, $82.28; West Bridgewater, $77.78; Ash- 
land, $75.51; Oxford, $68.57; Hatfield, $65.61; Holbrook, 
$65.08; Hadley, $63.57. The average cost for these towns 
other than Hatfield is $80.73, or $15.12 more for each child. 

The cost in Amherst is $104.31; Deerfield, $96.48; 
Easthampton, $85.60; Northampton, $84.62; Sunderland, 
$80.32; Whately, $79.87. 

The estimated budget for this year is $55,500. Of 
this amount, the town receives from outside sources approx- 
imately $17,000 which is between $3000 and $4000 more 
than was received three or four years ago. The budget 
includes the cost of some of these needed improvements, 
increases in salaries and the establishment of a commercial 
course in the Academy. The reasons for the introduction of 
this course are given in the reports that follow. 

Last year the rooms on the first floor of the Center 
School were retinted and all the furniture put in good con- 
dition. This year all the rooms on the second floor were 
retinted and furniture put in good condition. The Hill 
School building was given a thorough repairing inside and 
out, and some new furniture installed. The West Hatfield 
School building was thoroughly repaired inside and out. 
All the buildings are now in good condition with the ex- 
ception of the exterior of the Bradstreet and Center School 
buildings. 

In closing, we wish to call your attention to the re- 
ports of the Superintendent of Schools, Principal of the 
Academy and the Supervisors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH W. CHANDLER, 
J. HENRY CHARLEBOIS, 
FRANCIS W. LOVETT. 



43 



Financial Statement 



ESTIMATED FINANCIAL BUDGET FOR 1930 

School Committee $200.00 

Superintendent of Schools 

and Attendance Officer 2,500.00 

#Of this amount the State 
pays $950.00 
Supervisors of Music, Drawing and Pen- 
manship, and Health Education 2,900.00 
Teachers — Academy 7,250.00 

Teachers — Elementary 23,300.00 

#Of the salaries the State 
pays $12,400.00 
Teachers — Vocational 4,800.00 

Supplies — Vocational 600.00 

Travel — Vocational 200.00 

i£The State pays two-thirds of 
all salaries in the Agricultural 
Dept. and one-half of the total 
expenses of the Household Arts 
• Dept. amounting to about 
$3,700.00 
Books and supplies 3,000.00 

Janitors and supplies 3,300.00 

Fuel 3,700.00 

Repairs 600.00 

Athletics 200.00 

Miscellaneous 400.00 

Transportation — Academy 1,050.00 

Transportation — Elementary 400.00 



$54,400.00 



44 
Smith-Hughes Fund 400.00 

$54,000.00 

Establishment of Commercial Dept. 1,500.00 

Total Budget for 1930 $55,500.00 

# These estimates are based 
on last year's receipts. 



45 



Report of Supt. of Schools 



To the School Committee, Parents and Citizens: 

A careful study of the Household Arts department 
showed that the course of study did not hold the interest 
of the girls for four years. By readjusting the work of 
the department, the four years' course has. been reduced 
to a two years' course without eliminating many of the 
real valuable factors. As it is a more intensive course, it 
is likely to hold the interest much better. When the House- 
hold Arts course is completed, many of the girls will be 
glad to remain if a vocational course that is interesting and 
valuable can be offered. 

We believe that a two years' Commercial Course open 
to Juniors and Seniors will be of great educational and 
practical value not only to the girls of the Household Arts 
department but also to other members of the school who 
would like to acquire a knowledge of business forms and 
skills for their individual use later or as a basis of a thor- 
ough and extended course at the Northampton or other 
Commercial College. The Commercial Course would be 
organized on the same basis as Agriculture and Household 
Arts, one-half the time given to technical work and one- 
half given to regular academic subjects. The course should 
advance those who complete it with credit about one full 
year when they enter a regular Commercial College. 

By 1960, the typewriter will become about as indispen- 
sable in the average home as was the steel pen in 1860. 
The demand for general knowledge of business forms and 
principles will advance in about the same ratio. 

A Commercial Course will meet a real need and will 
make the curricula of the Academy as broad, complete and 



46 

efficient as any educational unit of its size and type in the 
Commonwealth. 

The two vocational departments have been of great 
value to the boys and girls of Hatfield'. When small depart- 
ments like the agricultural and household arts departments 
in Smith Academy can year after year develop and train 
young people who can take first places in local, State and 
National contests, they are surely worthy of liberal support. 
A Commercial Course will make an equally valuable con- 
tribution. The. proposed department is unanimously rec- 
ommended by the School Committee and the Board of 
Trustees of Smith Academy. The Trustees will make the 
necessary adjustments in the building for the department 
and supply the desks, tables and chairs. 

Realizing that it will be inadvisable for several years 
to establish a fully organized and equipped Junior High 
school at the Center building, an inexpensive but quite im- 
portant change in that direction was made last September 
by establishing a system of departmental work in the sixth, 
seventh and eighth grades. In each room on the upper 
floor, the regular room teacher conducts the first and last 
recitation in the forenoon and afternoon. During the other 
periods, the teachers of special subjects as arithmetic, geo- 
graphy, history and English conduct the recitations in 
their s}3ecial subject in the different grades. This method 
unifies the work in each subject and gives the children in 
each grade the advantage of a teacher who is specializing 
in the preparation and teaching of each branch. As the 
senior high school is organized along similar lines, the 
transition from the upper grammar grades to the Academy 
will be less difficult. The change has strengthened the 
whole program and as the work develops a higher stand- 
ard of achievement will result. 

As in the past, several National Standard tests in 
arithmetic, history, reading and English have been given 
during the year. 



47 

The classes in history do excellent oral work, but when 
they are required to take the National Standard tests in 
this subject, the results are not quite as good as in the other 
studies. An excellent set of maps will be added to the 
historical equipment in all the grammar schools early in 
1930. We expect that this important study will be brought 
up this year to the highest National average. 

A comprehensive test was given in the solving of 
problems that required analytical thinking. The National 
average for the grades tested was 73 points. The local 
average for all the children in the grades tested was 72. 

Two National Standard tests in reading have been 
given — one in June and one in November. Both of these 
tests were more difficult than the previous tests have been. 
In June, the local average for all the grades tested was 44.2 
points. The National Standard for the same grades was 
44 points. In November, the local average for grades 2 
to 8, was 23 points. The National Standard was 24 points. 

These were different tests by different experts with 
different bases of computation, but both were scientifically 
compiled and graded. 

A Standard test in reading compiled for primary 
grades was given in the second and third grades. One uni- 
form Standard test with the same questions was given to 
all the children in all the grades from the fourth to the 
senior class in the academies to determine the progress made 
through the grades in the comprehension of the printed 
page. To show how uniform this progress has been through 
these grades in both towns since this method in reading was 
introduced, the average scores are given below : 

Grades 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

Average Scores— Hatfield 14 27 12 20 26 28 31 34 37 41 47 

Average Scores— Hadley 15 25 15 20 26 28 35 35 35 45 46 

A very comprehensive National Standard test in tech- 
nical English has just been given in grades 7 to 12 inclu- 



48 

sive. The test was the same for grades 7 and 8. It cov- 
ered 127 questions to be answered in 30 minutes. The 
high school test was the same for the four classes and cov- 
ered 174 questions to be answered in 40 minutes. The local 
average for all seventh grade children was 96 points or 1 1 
points above the National average which was 85. The 
average for all eighth grades was 105 points, or 10 points 
above the National average which was 95. This was the 
best standing that the children have ever achieved with a 
National test. 

To show how evenly matched the two academies are 
in technical English as well as in athletics, the average 
scores for both schools are given below : 

Grades 
Average Scores — Smith 
Average Scores — Hopkins 

The teachers in the lower grades merit their share of 
credit for the excellent results in technical English shown 
in the report given above as they have given much atten- 
tion to this important branch and have trained the children 
very efficiently in oral as well as written English. 

As few rural schools are included in the establishment 
of the standards used in the National tests, the fact that 
our children are maintaining these standards is very com- 
plimentary to them and to the teachers. 

In closing, I wish to thank the children, parents, teach- 
ers, supervisors, citizens and Members of the School Com- 
mittee for the hearty cooperation given during the year. 

Respectfully sumbitted, 

ORION A. MORTON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



9 


10 


11 


12 


121 


122 


133 


134 


118 


124 


139 


129 



49 



Principal of Smith Academy 



To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Com- 
mittee of the Town of Hatfield. 

I hereby respectfully submit my second annual report 
as principal of Smith Academy. 

During the year 1928-29 there were enrolled in Smith 
Academy 90 pupils and eight were graduated. Of these, 
five are now attending some higher institution; three at 
Stockbridge School in Amherst, one at Rider College in 
New Jersey, and one at Framingham Normal School. 

Enrollment at the opening of school in September 1929 
was 8 8 divided as follows: Senior class 16, Junior class 16, 
Sophomore class 26, Freshman class 30. Since the open- 
ing of school seven pupils have left school and three have 
entered leaving a total enrollment at present of 84. 

The percent of attendance for this year up to this 
point is 93% as compared to 85%, the percent for the cor- 
responding period of last year. During the first nine weeks 
of school thirteen pupils were neither absent, tardy, nor 
dismissed. This increase over last year's record is very 
gratifying and the pupils and their parents deserve a great 
deal of credit for their cooperation in making this possible. 
It is impossible to emphasize too strongly the fact that 
prompt and constant attendance is the primary requisite 
in building up a satisfactory system of education. 

Last September a program of physical education was 
inaugurated under the supervision of Mr, Kalloch, assisted 
by Miss Day. Each day a ten-minute period is devoted 
to setting-up exercises and corrective calisthenics. When 
the weather is suitable these drills are held out of doors 
but in inclement weather the exercises are given indoors 



50 

with all windows open. In connection with this program 
of physical education each candidate for an athletic team 
is given a thorough physical examination. 

Tests have been given this fall to determine the pupils' 
rate of readings to find out how much they understand of 
what they read;, and to locate each pupil's particular diffi- 
culties in English grammar. The Somes-Harry High School 
General Achievement Test was also given in four fields: 
English^ mathematics, natural science and social science. 

A change in the curriculum was made in September 
when the four-year Household Arts course was changed to 
a two-year course. This change was made in order that 
duplication of instruction might be avoided and that a 
more concentrated course might be offered. In addition, 
an examination of the records since 1921 shows that only 
seven pupils have taken the Household Arts course for four 
years and that only a very small percentage have taken the 
course for more than two years. 

This year the Academy pupils are competing for pos- 
session of a cup donated by the faculty. This cup will be 
held for one year by the class securing the greatest num- 
ber of points in a series of events or forms of competition. 
The chief form of competition is attendance but we have 
also held two volley-ball tournaments, one for the boys and 
one for the girls. An attempt has been made this year to 
advance the idea that sports and competitive athletics 
should be for all the pupils and not for a few individuals. 
More inter-class competition is planned for the remainder 
of the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD O. BURRILL, 

Principal. 



51 



Music Supervisor 



The fundamental purpose of our music in the public 
schools is to develope a desire and at the same time to 
cultivate a working knowledge and appreciation of music. 
Thus, from the first grade on thro' the school life of the 
child, our task is to inspire and stimulate the desire for 
good music, and to build an adequate background of this 
knowledge. 

Music reading, song singing, and appreciation are 
three of the broad subjects which constitute our outline. 

The upper grades in the center of the town have been 
visited every week and the lower grades and outside schools 
every second week for a longer period. Smith Academj^ 
has two music periods weekly, for chorus and glee clubs. 
All" orchestra practise is held evenings. 

Our outstanding musical activities during the past 
year have consisted of programs furnished by glee clubs, 
selected and full choruses, and orchestra at various school 
activities in the Academy including special assemblies, 
plays, prize speaking contests, Memorial Day exercises and 
Commencement week programs. The children of all the 
schools in town also assisted in the Memorial Day pro- 
gram. 

In closing I wish to express to our superintendent, Mr. 
Morton, the school committee, principals, teachers and 
pupils, my sincerest appreciation for their hearty coopera- 
tion and kindly efforts which are most valuable assets in 
making our music a success. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



52 



Supervisor of Penmanship and 
Drawing 



"The teaching of art should be the strengthening of 
the sense of beauty. There are certain by-products which 
niust not be obscured. These by-products are an interest 
in order and the habit of using the imagination. Order 
of design is the basis of science as well as of art and if 
a child acquires simply an understanding of it^ he has ac- 
quired the foundations of a balanced life." 

The greatest gift the litle child can give is his imagin- 
ation. This faculty of imagination should be strengthened 
in all grades. Definite problems are given to the class. 
Nursery tales and primer stories which he reads, are used. 
He is taught to emphasize the main ideas. Therefore only 
simple stories are chosen such as, "The Three Bears", 
"Peter Babbit", etc. Besides stories, the holidays furnish 
illustration material. The aim in these drawings is good 
proportion, vigorous action and good color. 

Posters, cuts from magazines, advertisements, and il- 
lustrated books are all brought into service in this tppe of 
work. 

More stress has been given to this phase of the work 
in the past year. The child finds it rather difficult at first, 
but later he enjoys it more than anything else, because he 
has created something himself and once he has accom- 
plished this, he is not content. He goes farther adding 
more to the first and thus he grows. 

The fifth grades did a transportation problem in the 
spring. Old and modern methods of travel were illustrat- 
ed. Some of the illustrations were very colorful. 



53 

The drawing and painting of still life is put into the 
curriculum to teach the beauty of common things, accuracy 
of representation., and simple perspective. 

Handwriting is a useful tool by means of which both 
present and assured future needs may be served. A neces- 
sary aim for the operator of the penmanship tool is to 
learn to write with muscular movement and at such speed 
as will enable him to meet these needs. 

Pupils should be aroused to an appreciation of the 
fact that the attainment of skill is but one. phase of the 
problem. A clear appreciation of the use of the skill is 
needed on the part of all if a desirable degree of carry 
over is to be effected. Attitude is everything. This fact 
was well proven in the tests given in the middle of the 
year. Where the attitude was right, the carry over was 
right and the examination very satisfactory. The carry 
over work depending upon the attitude of the teacher and 
the child is the biggest problem in the penmanship work. 
The drill lesson of twenty minutes a day is of very little 
importance if the principles taught are forgotten for the 
rest of the day. One teacher who spends very little time 
on drill but much time on principles, board work, and car- 
ry over had an average of 97% for three grades of forty- 
five pupils which was a very creditable standing. 

Other teachers with the same attitude had practically 
the same result. 

Examinations for pins and diplomas were given only 
in grades five, six, seven and eight this year. The re- 
sults are as follows: Final Certificate 30; Business Certifi- 
cates 7; Improvement Certificates 15; Progress Pins 29. 
These examinations were voluntary on the part of the 
pupils. Only those desiring awards were asked to submit 
their papers. 

This has been a very happy and encouraging year. 
I wish to express my sincere gratitude to Mr. Morton, who 



54 



has been most helpful, to the principals and teachers for 
their help and cooperation in making this work pleasant 
and profitable. 

BERNICE B. ORMOND. 



55 



Supervisor of Health Education 

1928-29 



Health Education in the public schools is at the pres- 
ent in the pioneering 1 stage. So long, the public has looked 
upon the health work in schools as a corrective measure 
only; that a definite and conscious effort to teach pre- 
vention is a difficult precedent to establish. Again, until 
within recent years health teaching was more or less con- 
fined to intermediate and upper grades. 

A careful study of the results of physical examinations 
and medical inspections, proved that to attempt to eradi- 
cate even a small percent of the remedial defects under 
such a program was a futile undertaking. The instruction 
and corrections must begin in the pre-school or primary 
age to be worth the time and expense involved. 

The teaching of good health habits; the correcting 
of dental and other defects in the primary lower forms; 
the expression of the understanding of good health habits 
continued in the upper primary grades, in correlation with 
the regular class work, reading, art and story telling is 
proving to be a successful health program. The grammar 
grades study the subject of hygiene and healthy living 
from text-books and learn the relation of good habits to 
the proper functioning of the physical and mental faculties. 

The posture of the rapidly growing child so closely 
allied to nutrition as to be treated as one topic is materially 
affected by improper seating in the class room. Two of 
the rooms in the Centre school have desks and chairs much 
too small. 

Corrective work goes on steadily, but slowly. Eyes 
are the first objective and seven children have been pro- 



56 

vided with glasses this year. The use of the Audiometer 
in testing the hearing showed defects unsuspected., and it 
is hoped the entire school may be tested next year. 

The record of 13 children showing marked enlarged 
thyroid gland is a subject for special investigation. Altho' 
the dental clinic did not operate in Hatfield this term, a 
number of children needing special attention were taken 
to the school clinic in Hadley, also, children having a rec- 
ord of tubercular contact were carried to Westfield Sana- 
torium for chest examination and X-ray. 

Mild epidemics of chicken-pox and mumps affected 
the Hill; School and Bradstreet schools, no serious results 
or complications. Several children were absent from school 
for lengthy periods owing to physical ailments more or less 
serious and were cared for by their physicians. All but 
one returned to school on full time before the school closed 
in June. 

The tabulation below is a statement of- the physical 
rating of the individual schools. 













Ton- 


Nut& 




Hear 


School 


Exam. 


Passed 


Failed Teeth 


sils 


Pos. 


Vis. 


Hyg inj 


W. Hatfield 


52 


41 


11 


7 


1 


1 


2 





N. Hatfield 


78 


58 


20 


14 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Bradstreet 


91 


68 


23 


14 


6 


2 


1 





Hill 


67 


55 


12 


7 


3 


1 


1 





School 


75 


60 


15 


10 


3 


1 


1 





Centre 


282 


20)8 


74 


50 


10 


5 


5 


4 


High 


88 


60 


28 


20 


3 


1 


3 


1 



The thyroid enlargements are not rated in this class- 
ification. 

Heart murmur 3, are not rated in this classification. 

With the exception of one school, the sanitation of 
the schools has been good, proper lighting and ventilating 
has been well supervised by the teachers. Hot lunches of 
cocoa or soup were prepared in the Centre school during the 



57 

cold days of winter at a very small cost and the tables and 
benches in the basement were kept in condition for all child- 
ren to use while eating their lunch at school. 

Three children needing special care are at the Summer 
Health Camp in Leeds. The capacity of the camp allows 
for only three children from Hatfield to be admitted and 
much thought and interest was shown by school physicians 
in helping to decide the lucky trio, as the camp is one of 
the best of the kind in the country. Two girls are at 
camp in July, both girls have been out of school a great 
deal since the beginning of the year owing to poor physical 
condition. One boy from Bradstreet school will be the 
lucky lad for the month of August. 

The class in Home Hygiene in connection with the 
Home Economics Dept. High school, completed their 
course and were given certificates from the American Na- 
tional Red Cross, Washington, D. C, in addition to the 
credits of the school department. 

I appreciate sincerely the cooperation of the teachers, 
and the interest and advice given by the school physicians 
in the care and work of the Health Department of the 
public schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN HOLMES, R. N. 



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John B. Kalloch 

♦Edward J. Burke 

Mary E. Ryan 

Alice E. Brockway 

Ebba E. Ekberg 

Clarence J. Larkin 

Margaret A. Ryan 

RoseC. Finn 

Sarah V. Kiley 

Anna Donnis 

Grace W. Bardwell 

Catherine T. Shea 

Mary E. Fenton 

Katherine I. Hayes 

Marie A. Proulx 

Lena P. Fitzgerald 

Constance B. Mullany 

Eleanor R. Whalen 

Harold L. Ford 

Anna Osley 

Mary C. Kelly 

Mary D. Donelson 

Mary E. Farley 

Ellen M. O'Hara 

Kathleen Connelly 

Maude E. Boyle 

Bernice B. Ormond 

Marian Holmes Totals 


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ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS || 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 



For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

I93O 



\ 



1 



HATFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



ag - ar -a g -at g- -x - rr ag a g. is ~ zrU 



ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 

For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

I93O 




Metcalf Printing & Publishing Co., Inc. 
Northampton, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 
For Town Meeting, February 16, 1931 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables of the Town of Hat- 
field, in said County, Greetings: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, 
to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 16th 
day of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles to wit. : 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for the en- 
suing year. Moderator. Town Clerk, Three Selectmen, One As- 
sessor for three years, One Water Commissioner for three years. 
One member of the School Committee for three years, Town 
Treasurer, One member of the Library Committee for three 
years, Tree Warden, Tax Collector. Elector under the Will of 
Oliver Smith, Six Constables, all of the foregoing to be voted 
for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon, and 
kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time as the 
majority of the voters present shall direct but in no case will 
they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the evening. 

Article 2. To hear the report of the various town officers. 

Article 3. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote, raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to pay School House Note No. 31, and 
interest, amount required $2,225.00 



Article 5. To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81 of the General Laws, and raise and ap- 
propriate money for same, amount recommended $6,900.00 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the ordinary repairs and maintenance of 
the highways, sewers, bridges, sidewalks, and equipment. 
Amount recommended $3,000.00 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of the bonds of town officers. 
Amount recommended $220.00 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for repairs and care of Dickinson Memorial 
Hall for the ensuing year. Amount recommended $150.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the inspection of animals, barns, and slaughter- 
ing. Amount recommended $300.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate $695.00 for Tree and Moth work, and re-appropriate 
$305.00 from the Excess and Deficiency account, unexpended 
balances of these accounts for 1930. Total amount recommend- 
ed, Tree Work $800.00 

Moth Work $200.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote the following 
amounts for maintenance of the Fire Department, to raise and 
appropriate $700.00, and re-appropriate $600.00 from the Ex- 
cess and Deficiency account, from the unexpended balance of 
1930. Total amount recommended $1,300.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote the following for 
insurance, to raise and appropriate $2,050.00, and appropriate 
from the Truck and Roller earnings $1,265.25, total amount re- 
commended for insurance $3,3 15.25 

Aiuumrl T u cumm u nJ u A J jJS - jSQQ . QQ , 



Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the care of the poor for the ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $2,500.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for interest. Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the following amounts for salaries and expenses of 
town officers for the ensuing year: 



Salaries, Selectmen 300.00 Expenses $100.00 
Salary, Clerk of Board, Selectmen 100.00 

Salary, Town Clerk 500.00 Expenses 90.00 

Salary, Treasurer 600.00 Expenses 50.00 

Salary, Town Accountant 800.00 Expenses 10.00 

Salary, Assessors 850.00 Expenses 25.00 
Salary, Tax Collector, 1 % of entire 

levy, estimated 800.00 Expenses 80.00 
Salary, Sealer of Weights and 

Measures 150.00 Expenses 50.00 

Salary, Election and Registration 100.00 Expenses 30.00 

Expenses of Safety Committee, appropriation 300.00 
Re-appropriation from Excess and Deficiency, 

balance from 1930, 275.00 total 575.00. 

Total amount recommended for salaries $4,200.00 Exp. $1,010.00 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the maintenance of the schools for the en- 
suing year. Amount recommended $55,500.00 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the employment of one or more school 
physicians for the ensuing year. Amount recommended $200.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the care of the cemeteries for the ensuing 
year. Amount recommended $100.00 



*f 



6 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. Amount recommended 

$125.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library. Amount recommended 

$1,300.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of the tuition of Hatfield stu- 
dents to Smith's Agricultural School. Amount recommended 

$900.00 y 

Six students attending Jan. 1, 1931. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for police protection for the ensuing year. 
Amount recommended $2,600.00 

Article 23. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for street lights. Amount recommended $4,586.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to install, the fol- 
lowing additional street lights, One light on Depot Road, near 
John Yanginski's, One light on South St., One light on Chestnut 
St., near John F. Betsold, One near John J. Stenglein's, and 
raise and appropriate money for same. Amount recommended 

$76.00 

Article 25. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
$500.00, and re-appropriate $500.00 from the Excess and De- 
ficiency account unexpended balance of Unclassified Account for 
1930, for reserve fund. Amount recommended $1,000.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men to cooperate with the State and County under the provisions 
of Chapter 90 of the General Laws, to continue the improvement 
of the Bradstreet Depot road from Sam Field's corner Easterly, 
and raise and appropriate money for same. Amount recommend- 
ed • $2,000.00 



With like amounts contributed by State and County. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the unclassified accounts. Amount recom- 
mended $200.00 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money to pay overdraft on the Highway and Bridge 
account. Amount recommended $238.56 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for attorneys fees. Amount recommended 

$400.00 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the maintenance and care of New Town 
Hall. Amount recommended $2,000.00 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money to install tablet with the names of Hatfield citi- 
zens that served in the late World War, in Memorial Hall in 
accordance with the recommendations of the Building Committee, 
also to install the memorial tablets that were in the Dickinson 
Memorial Hall, in the New Hall. Amount recommended $350.00 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to re-appoint the 
old Town Hall Committee, consisting of D. P. Sheehan, Chair- 
man, W. L. Belden, J. C. Ryan, Alex Donnis and W. H. Dick- 
inson and the Board of Selectmen to have supervision of the 
New Town Hall and make the necessary improvements to the 
grounds, etc. and raise and appropriate money for the same, or 
act any thing thereon. Amount recommended $400.00 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money to pay Joseph Yarrows for the collection of the 

Auto Excise Taxes of 1929. Amount recommended $200.00 

Total amount recommended $98,495.81 

Less re-appropriations 2,945.25 



Total amount to be raised by taxes $95,550.56 



8 

The Finance Committee wish to state in regard to the vari- 
ous requests asked for in the way of improvements on the various 
roads of the town all of these will be taken care of under Article 
5 if the town will continue to cooperate with the State under 
provisions of Chapter 81 of the General laws there will be no 
poor roads in the town, in a few years. 

Although we have recommended little over three thousand 
dollars more to be raised this year than last; there will be an 
increase in the tax rate over last year, more than the extra ap- 
propriations would call for, for the reason that there will be 
much less received from the State in income taxes. 

The Tax Commissioner, Mr. Long, has notified all towns 
and cities to bear this in mind when making up their budgets for 
1931, we have done so and kept the appropriations as low as 
possible. 

WILLIAM H. DICKINSON, 
ROBERT L. BELDEN, 
JOHN W. MULLINS, 

Finance Commiteee. 



Article 34. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money for Water Department expenses, from available 
water revenue of 1930 and prior. Amount asked for $5,000.00 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money from the available water revenue of 1930 and 
prior, to pay Town Hall notes due April 1st 1931, and interest, 
amount of note $4,381.75. Interest $2,443.75. Total amount 
asked for $6,825.50 

Article 36. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 



Article 37. To revise and accept the list of Jurors sub- 
mitted by the Selectmen. 

Article 38. To hear the report of the Memorial Town Hall 
Committee, and act any thing thereon. 

Article 39. To see if the town will vote to lease or rent 
the hall at the North Hatfield School, to a club or organization 
for basketball, or act anything thereon. 

-Article 40. To see if the town will vote to appoint a com- 
mittee of four to have supervision of the Historical Rooms and 
contents on the second floor of the Dickinson Memorial Hall. 

Article 41. To see if the town will vote to appoint a com- 
mittee of three to investigate the matter of fire fighting ap- 
paratus for the town and report at future meeting. 

Article 42. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate $350.00 as an addition to the present salaries for As- 
sessors. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof in five public places in said town seven 
days before time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 30th day of January in the year 
of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred thirty-one. 

JOSEPH PORADA, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
D. P. SHEEHAN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 

A true Copy: 

Attest A. R. Breor, Constable. 
January 30, 1931. 



10 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Hatfield, Mass. 
Gentlemen : 

In compliance with the provisions of Section 61, Chapter 
41, of the General Laws, I herewith submit the report of your 
Town Accountant for the year ending December 31, 1930. 
Respectfully, 

VERNET H. KELLER, 

Town Accountant. 

Balance on hand 'January 1, 1930 $33,069.40 



RECEIPTS 




GENERAL REVENUE 


Tax Levies, 




Previous years 


$24,091.84 


Current year, poll 


1,306.00 


Real & Personal 


38,109.50 


Auto Excise 


3,786.94 




$ fi7 °04 °9 


From the Commonwealth 




Income Taxes 


$21,190.80 . 


Corporation Tax 


3,825.93 


Bank & Trust Co. Tax 


110.08 


School Fund 


2,268.05 


Union Supt. 


966.66 


Vocational Education 


3,206.22 


Smith-Hughes Fund 


379.11 


Reed Fund 


26.78 




$ 31,973.63 



11 



License Fees, 

Gasoline & Alcohol Permits, 

and old sealers $25.23 

Pedler & Junk 87.00 

Pool 6.00 

Slaughter 3.00 



$ 121.23 

CouriTFines 942.25 

Hampshire County Dog Fund 260.91 

All Other General Revenue 

E. Yarrows, Sewer entrance $33.00 

City of Northampton, Lieu of Taxes 

on reservoir land 46.42 

$ 79.42 



DEPARTMENTAL 



Highways, 






Work done and use of cement mixer 


$196.58 




Fence Damage 


41.43 




Sale of materials 


19.40 




Truck & Roller account 


1,265.35 






<fc 


1,522.76 




<P 


From State, Chap. 81 


$4,600.00 




From State, Chap. 90 


1,999.60 




From County Chap. 90 


1,999.60 






$ 


8,599.20 


Charities, 


w 


From individuals 


$ 35.00 




From State 


48.57 




From State Mothers Aid 


201.34 

$ 


284.91 



12 



Miscellaneous, 

Schools, sale of school ti( 
Library Fines 

Sealers Fees 


^kets, etc. 


$13.27 
11.90 
80.11 


105.28 




$ 


Interest, 

From Taxes 

Deposits 

Town Hall Notes 

Premium on Town Hall Notes 

Income perpetual care funds 


$758.11 

996.35 

21.25 

720.00 

182.00 


2 ; 677.71 
1,590.34 


Memorial Town Hall Fund, 
Sale of land and buildir 


LgS 


«P 


Water Dept., 

Sale of wood 
Water Rent 1929 
Water Rent 1930 




$ 25.00 

.50 

6,206.69 


6,232.19 
80,000.00 


Municipal Indebtedness, 
Temporary loan 
Town Hall Loan 




w 

$20,000.00 
60,000.00 




<P 


Refunds and Transfers, 
Wilkie Fund 
Library Fund 
Thos. J. O'Dea, overpa; 


yment 


$1,479.72 ' 
92.59 
19.25 


1,591.56 




<P 


Cemetery Funds, 

From State, Hannah W. 
Auditors adjustment 


Smith Fui 


id 


12.00 
3.56 


Total receipts 


$236,350.63 



13 

PAYMENTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen., 

Salaries^ $300.00 

Expense 100.15 



Clerk of Board of Selectmen, 




Salary 




Town Clerk, 




Salary 


$500.00 


Expense 


97.10 


Town Treasurer, 




Salary 


$600.00 


Expense 


102.36 


Town Accountant, 




Salary 




Tax Collector, 




Salary, account 


$389.06 


Expense 


119.80 


Assessors, 




Salaries 


$850.00 


Expense 


23.80 



$400.15 



100.00 



$597.10 



702.36 



799.92 



$508.86 



$873.80 

Election and Registration, 

Salaries 210.00 

Safety Committee, 

Expense 24.08 



14 



Dickinson Meraoria 


1 Hall, 




Repairs 




$ 49.39 


Mowing lawn 




10.00 


Fuel 




137.08 


Janitor 




50.55 


Supplies 




2.98 


Other Finance accounts, 




Printing Cupons, 


Town 




Hall notes 




$41.75 


Approving notes 




60.00 



$250 



$101.75 



Bonds, Town Officers 217.50 



Total for General Government $ 4,785.52 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police, 

Salaries $1,986.39 

Payment on car 161.00 

Equipment and repairs 359.27 

Telephone 30.85 

Gas & Oil 164.57 

Garage Rent 75.00 

Expense of trips to Bridgewater 8.90 

2,785.98 



Fire Department, 




Wages 


$ 5.00 


Storage 


140.00 


Gas & Oil 


2.34 


Supplies and Repairs 


92.11 


New Hose 


364.62 

< 



604.07 



15 



Sealer of Weights and Measures, 
Salary 
Expense and Mileage 


$150.00 

50.03 

< 


Forestry, 

Trimming Trees, 
Salary and Wages 
Supplies 


$529.89 

44.23 

< 


Moth extermination, 
Wages 
Supplies 


$112.50 
8.08 



200.03 



574.12 



120.58 



Total for protection of persons 

and property $4,284.78 

Health and Sanitation, 

Inspection of School Children $200.00 

Inspection of Meat 88.25 

Inspection of Animals and Barns 231.00 



519.25 



Credit of $19.25, refund for 

overpayment on this account 
Total for Health and Sanitation $ 519.25 



NEW TOOL HOUSE 



Materials 


$2,188.21 


Sawing Lumber 


248.14 


Survey 


5.00 


Erection Contract 


750.00 


Labor, Trucks, drawing materials, etc. 


834.40 


Insurance 


35.00 




$ 4,060.75 



16 



HIGHWAYS 


General, Bridges, Sidewalks, 


Sewers, etc. 


Salaries and Wages 


$1,000.42 


Equipment, Snow plow 


450.00 


Equipment, Tar kettle 


195.00 


Repairs and Supplies 


803.12 


Gas and Oil 


572.89 


Painting, F. W. D. Truck 


75.00 


Lumber 


225.11 


Beacon Light 


36.80 


Street Signs 


12.00 


Care, Main and Bridge, 




Commons 


49.00 


Snow Removal 


213.02 




<fc p f?qo qfi 


Chapter 81, 


^ tp OjOOa.OO 


Salaries and Wages 


$3,620.09 


Trucks and Teams 


3,424.82 


Stone and Gravel 


1,050.06 


Tar 


2,712.12 


Fuel and Cement 


66.34 


Culverts 


570.67 


Tools and Freight 


55.90 




<fc 1 1 errjn no 




tp ±l,OUU.UU 


Chapter 90, 




Salaries and Wages 


$1,318.45 


Trucks and Teams 


583.50 


Stone and Gravel 


3,039.41 


Tar 


888.96 


Lumber 


23.08 


Roller 


50.00 


Coal 


95.30 



17 



Riverside Bridge Repairs, 
Haarman Steel Co., 

Steel and Labor $1,365.03 

Town Sal. and Wages 328.39 



1,693.42 

$ 22,824.48 



STREET LIGHTS 

Western Counties Electric Co. 4,585.92 



Total for Highways $ 27,410.40 



Charities, 




General expense 


$ 41.43 


Provisions 


110.37 


Fuel 


31.40 


Board and Care 


143.99 


Medical Aid 


63.75 


State Institutions 


157.00 


Charges by other Cities 




and Towns 


1,074.26 


Mothers Aid 


520.00 

< 



-$ 2,142.20 
Total for Charities $ 2,142.20 

SCHOOLS 



meral Administration, 




Salary of Union 




Superintendent 


$1,700.02 


Enforcement Officer 


400.00 


Printing, Stationery and Post. 146.36 


Telephones 


93.05 


Traveling Expenses 


209.07 


Census 


25.00 


Miscellaneous 


11.75 

< 



$ 2,585.45 



18 



Salaries, 

Teachers, High 
Teachers, Elementary 
Vocational 
Commercial 


$10,765.28 

25,992.25 

813.31 

520.00 


38,090.84 
5,081.41 


Text Books and Supplies, 
High 

Elementary 
Commercial 

(Typewriters $840) 


<P 

$1,580.65 
2,512.28 

988.48 




$ 


Tuition, 

City of Northampton 
Transportation, 

High 

Elementary 


$749.00 
534.38 


92.48 
1,283.38 




*P 


Janitors, 
High 
Elementary 


$ 630.84 
2,622.24 


Q OKQ flC 


Fuel and Light, 
High 
Elementary 


*P 

$ 990.11 
2,763.59 

-$ 


3,753.70 



Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds, 
High, Agl. Repairs $ 63.33 

Janitors supplies 45.48 

Repairs, Elementary 1,055.58 

Janitors supplies 223.70 

$ 1,388.09 



19 



Furniture and Fixtures, 






High 


$ 89.70 




Elementary 


163.70 






$ 


253.40 


Rent, 


*P 


Smith School Arena 




30.00 


Graduation Exercises, 






Speaker 


$25.00 




Printing and Stationery 


45.22 






«fc 


70.22 




<P 



Total for Schools $55,882.05 

Hatfield Students at Smith Agricultural School 
Tuition $ 700.00 

Six students attending, Jan. 1, 1931 

Tuition, $3.75 per week per student 

State reimburses the town for one-half 
of this amount. 





LIBRARY 




Salaries and Wages 




$431.73 


Books 




494.27 


Periodicals 




24.25 


Light 




27.40 


Repairs 




93.88 



20 



Stationery and Postage 21.75 

Supplies 9.65 



REMODELING LIBRARY 



Contract for wood work and 




new door 


$743.52 


Electrical work 


107.17 


Refmishing, interior 


455.33 


Miscellaneous 


2.45 



Bill for floor covering not in at close of year. 





INSURANCE 




Schools 




$1,264.00 


Town Hall 




242.25 


Workmens Comp 




367.85 


Trucks 




51.40 


Burglar 




42.32 

< 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Printing Town Reports $128.00 

Care Town Clock 25.00 

Sal. Elector 10.00 

Moving Safes 32.00 



MEMORIAL DAY 

Band $80.00 

Flags .,. 25.00 



1,102.93 



1,308.47 



$ 1,967.82 



195.00 



105.00 



21 



PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 



Water Department, 




Salaries of Commissioners 


$ 150.00 


Salary of Collector 


186.21 


Postage 


10.00 


Collectors Bond 


5.00 


Legal services 


29.20 


Purchase of land 


345.00 


Pine Seedlings 


46.00 


Salary and Wages 


4,031.88 


Pipe and Fittings 


54.73 


Equipment 


54.06 



$ 4,912.08 



CEMETERIES 

Labor at N. Hatfield $24.50 

Labor at W. Hatfield 10.00 

Labor Main St. 57.14 



NEW TOWN HALL 

Advertising $ 105.53 
D. A. Sullivan & Sons, Inc., 

Contact and Extras 62,320.40 

R. F. Mutter Co., Heating 7,936.00 

Putnam & Stewart, on acct. 2,500.00 

Auditorium chairs 2,431.70 

Office Furniture and Equipment 335.00 

Screens 153.00 

Curtains 209.00 

Showers 146.30 

Steel Shelving 43.52 



91.64 



22 



Fire Extinguishers 
Cement Walks 
Janitors supplies 
Insurance 
Stoker, on acct. 
State, Insp. of boilers 



48.00 
50.00 
80.20 
619.54 
200.00 
10.00 



$ 77,183.19 



Accounts unpaid Dec. 31., 
Balance on Stokers 
Balance due Architects 



1,190.00 



Temporary Loan 
School Loan 
Town Hall Loan 



INTEREST 



I 87.82 

315.00 

1,275.00 



-$ 1,677.82 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

School House Note No. 30 $ 2,000.00 



Temporary Loan 



20,000.00 



$ 22,000.00 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



Taxes, 
State 
County 
Audit 
Highway 
Snow removal 
Corp 

Bank and Trust Co. 
Veterans Exemption 
Perpetual Care Funds 



$3,150.00 

8,296.25 

519.89 

708.00 

176.95 

1.28 

7.89 

2.68 

194.00 



$ 13,056.94 



28 



Taxes, 1929 and 1930 


$32.00 




Auto Excise 


74.80 






<ft 


106.80 
5.51 


Adjustments 


jp 


Total Payments 




$223,498.15 


Gash balance 


$ 12,862.48 



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29 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1931 



Clifford L. Belden 
James Donlin 
John B. Bitner 
R os well G. Billings 
William P. Boyle 
Edward L. Boyle 
John L. Stenglein 
George A. Deinlein 
Philip Harris 
Ercent Godin 
Fred T. Bardwell 
George S. Betsold 
James L. McGrath 
John F. Sheehan 
Charles Pfiffer 
Joseph M. Slussars 
Vernet S. Keller 
John M. Wentzel 
Malcolm Crawford 
Henry Carl 
Michael Yarrows 
Thomas J. O'Dea 
Joseph L. Goller 
John Donnis 
Alexander T. Rogaleski 
Charles Klekot 
Oscar E. Belden 
John Mullins 
Myron H. Dwight 
Howard L. Belden 



30 



Treasurer's Report 



Francis W. Lovett, Treasurer, in account with 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance in Treasury January 1, 1930 $ 33,069.40 

Receipts for the year 1930 



Total receipts $236,357.07 

Disbursements for the year 1930 223,494.59 



Balance in Treasury, December 31, 1930 $ 12,862.48 



31 



Tax Collector's Report 



1929 PROPERTY TAX 




Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1929 


$29,949.14 


By Interest, Collected 


525.35 


By Abatements $ 48.75 




By Cash Paid Treas. 22,842.49 




Uncollected, Dec. 31, 1930 


7,583.25 


1929 POLL TAX 




Uncollected Dec. 31, 1929 


$20.00 


By Addition 


14.00 


By Interest Collected 


.05 


By Abatements $20.00 




By Refund 2.00 




By Cash Paid Treas, 12.05 




Uncollected, None 




1929 EXCISE TAX 




Uncollected Dec. 31, 1929 


$301.54 


By Interest Collected 


1.04 


By Cash Paid Treas. 247.06 




By Refunds 


16.93 


Uncollected Dec. 31, 1930 71.41 




1930 PROPERTY TAX 




To Warrant 


$65,504.54 


Interest Collected 


91.63 


By Abatements $ 28.65 




Tax Title 16.92 




By Cash Paid Treas, 38,079.60 




Uncollected Dec. 31, 1930 27,471.00 





32 



1930 POLL TAX 

To Warrant $1,336.00 

By Abatements $ 8.00 

By Cash Paid Treas. 1,306.00 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1930 22.00 

1930 EXCISE TAX 

To Warrant $4,935.90 

By Interest 3.08 

By Abatements $ 236.51 

By Cash Paid Treas. 3,786.92 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1930 915.55 

JOSEPH YARROWS, 

Collector. 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 



Fund 
Hannah W. Smith 
Augusta Wells 
Oliver Warner 
John H. Anderson 
Luman M. Moore 
P. M. Wells 
Benjamin Waite 
Abby Dickinson 
Silas G. Hubbard 
Levi Graves 
Lucy L. Morton 
Charles Smith 
Lemeul B. Field 
Rufus H. Cowles 



Income 


Expense 


Balance 


1930 


1930 


1930 


$16.10 


$ 4.00 


$ 99.03 


18.35 


10.00 


390.35 


2.52 


2.00 


53.40 


5.23 


4.00 


110.39 


11.21 


8.00 


236.92 


6.03 


5.00 


126.94 


4.04 


2.00 


86.73 


4.82 ; 


3.50 


102.25 


12.77 


4.00 


274.97 


7.88 


4.00 . 


,168.20 


15.19 


4.00 


, 328.15 


5.44 


4.00 


, 115.06 


5.39 


4.00. 


114 ; 35 


5.4a ... 


/ , 4.00 


116.25 



33 



Charles E. Hubbard 




5.77 


4.00 


122.05 


Alpheus Cowles 




5.29 


4.00 


111.83 


James Porter 




5.13 


4.00 


108.20 


Daniel W. Allis 




8.50 


5.00 


180.77 


J. H. Howard 




5.10 


4.00 


107.85 


Fannie M. Burke 




5.18 


4.00 


109.43 


Charles S. Shattuck 




5.16 


4.00 


109.24 


Seth W. Kingsley 




5.13 


4.00 


108.14 


E. S. Warner 








219.55 


Reuben Belden 




5.13 




112.19 


Theodore Porter 




4.99 


4.00 


105.15 


Charles L. Graves 




4.99 


4.00 


105.19 


Roswell Hubbard 




4.97 


4.00 


104.55 


Cooley D. Dickinson 




6.20 


5.00 


130.85 


Elijah Bar dwell 




17.74 


4.00 


382.99 


Joseph D. Billings 




4.94 


4.00 


104.03 


Memorial Town Hall, 


Int. 








Edward C. Billings 




29.50 


22.50 


608.10 


Augusta Beals 




5.01 


4.00 


106.17 


Anthony Douglas 




1.48 




61.06 


Received : 










J. E. Porter 




4.87 


4.00 


102.78 


Jonathan Graves 




4.85 


3.50 


102.80 


Hugh McLeod 




4.89 


4.00 


103.20 


B. M. Warner 




9.95 


4.00 


213.39 


Chester Hastings 




4.80 


3.50 


101.57 


Lucius & Stearns Curtis 


12.85 


8.00 


272.71 


Perpetual Care Funds Received 




201.00 


Paid out Care of Lots 








201.00 


Frary & Gardner, new 


acct. 


4.38 


4.00 


100.38 


Henry C. Batchellor, new acct. 


3.97 


4.00 


100.63 




F. W. 


LOVETT, 


Treasurer. 


- 



34 



Police Report 

Hatfield, Mass. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The report of the Police Department for the year end- 
ing December 31st, 1930, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests during the year 1930 75 

Drunkenness 14 

Automobile Violations 29 

Overloading Trucks 2 

Breaking and Entering 2 

Assault and Battery 2 

Assault with dangerous weapon 1 

Larceny 1 

Liquor Violations 3 

Bastardy 2 

Gaming 13 

Fish and Game 2 

Malicious Mischief 1 

Committed to State Farm 1 

Vagrancy 1 

Begetting illegitimate child 1 



75 

Total Fines, District Court $1,660.00 

Court Fines, turned back to Town Treasurer, 942.25 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



35 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 1930 

BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 

Male Female 

January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 

Total 23 17 

BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 



3 


2 


2 


1 





2 


6 


3 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 





3 








1 


1 





2 


1 


3 


2 





Fathers 


Mothers 


United States 


19 


21 


Poland 


16 


19 


Czecho-Slovakia 


2 


1 



Total 37 40 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


52 


46 


47 


54 


35 



36 



Total 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 



January- 


.2 . 


First marriage of both 




21 


February 


1 


Second of Groom 




2 


March 


1 


Second of Bride 




1 


April 


1 


Youngest Groom 




19 


May 


3 


Oldest Groom 




72 


June 


5 


Youngest Bride 




16 


July 


5 


Oldest Bride 




44 


August 


1 


Third of Bride 






September 


,1 


Birthplace 


Groom 


Bride 


October 


5 


United States 


19 


21 


November 


2 


Poland 


3 


1 


December 





Germany 
Canada 


1 


1 



23 



23 



23 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 
in 1930 



Boyle Anna G. 
Langdon, William W. 

Fitzgerald, 

Eberlein, Mary Zoller 
Gowash, Joseph 
Nolan, Margaret G. 
Doppman, Lorenze 
Brennan Edward Francis 

Jaworowski, 

Whitcomb, George Olin 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Belden, Emma Luce 



Rogalewski, John 
Kingsley, Seth W. 
Bokun, Zygmond 
Boyle, Bridget Hafey 
Graves, Mary Hubbard 
Baczewski, Anthony 
Zuroff, William 
Walsh, Nellie A. 
Kozontkowski, Katherine 

Kozontkowski, 

Nartowicz, Adam 



Oldest person (female) 97 years 1 month 10 days. 



37 



DOGS LICENSED 

151 Male Dogs at $2.00 $302.00 

11 Female Dogs at $5.00 each 55.00 

$ 357.00 

Less 162 fees at 20c each 32.40 



$ 324.60 
Paid County Treasurer $ 324.60 



88 



Water Commissioners' Report 



During the past year we have done considerable work 
on our water shed, and now have the most of it cleaned 
up and all vacant spaces set out to pines and spruces. 

We have purchased one piece of brush land about 35 
acres. 

This land adjoined some that we already owned and 
considering that there was a spring there that could be 
used to increase our water if necessary, we considered it 
wise to purchase it. 

We have been cleaning it up this winter and expect to 
set it out to pines in the spring. 

Our water supply has stood the test through the last 
two dry summers and the work we have been doing on the 
water shed is to make it as safe from fire and other damage 
as is possible. 

A visit to the reservoir would do any who have not seen 
it a lot of good. 

Let us show you around some time. 

J. W. KILEY, 
L. A. DENLEIN, 
R. G. BILLINGS. 



39 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed buildings 

Value of assessed land 

Value of Assessed Real Estate 

Value of assessed Personal Estate 

Value of assessed Real & Personal Estate 

Rate of Tax per $1,000.00 

Number of polls assessed 

Number of persons assessed on property 

Number of horses assessed 

Number of cows assessed 

Number of neat cattle assessed 

Number of sheep assessed 

Number of fowl assessed 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 

Number of automobiles assessed 

Acres of land assessed 

State tax 

State Highway tax 

State Audit tax 

£>tate snow removal tax 

County tax 

Overlayings 

Town tax 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Income tax 
Excise tax 
Corporation tax 
Bank tax 
Licenses 
Fines 



$1,551,351.00 

984,713.00 

2,536,064.00 

193,292.00 

$2,729,356.00 

$24.00 

668 

555 

301 

252 

75 

425 

1268 

465 

679 

9050 

$ 3,150.00 

708.00 

519.89 

176.95 

8,296.25 

674.80 

95,421.00 

$19,456.95 

4,000.00 

3,000.00 

250.00 

135.00 

325.00 



40 

Highways 8,600.00 

Schools 5,000.00 

All others 1,381.50 



VALUE OF PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Under Chap. 59, General Laws 

Church Property $ 68,000.00 

Town Property 256,400.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery 3,500.00 

Smith Academy 66,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN E. RAFFA, 
ADOLPH M. TOCZKO, 
JOHN R. McGRATH, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



41 



Report of Librarian 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield: 

The year 1930 has brought several changes in the 
library. 

It was with great regret the trustees of the library 
received the resignation of Miss Ellen Waite, our efficient 
and faithful librarian for the past thirteen years. 

Her conservative and wise selection gave the readers 
of the town the best in current fiction and she was ever 
ready to advise and guide our youth in their reading. 

On October 29, a special town meeting was held to 
consider the following articles : 

1. To see if the town will vote to authorize the select- 
men to accept two mortgages of $1000 and $400 from the 
Library Association, duly incorporated, of this town, the 
income arising therefrom, to be paid to the library trus- 
tees, for the maintenance of the Hatfield Public Library 
every year. 

2. To see if the town will vote to use the Charlotte 
Wilkie fund for enlargement and improvement of the 
Public Library. 

A committee of three, V. H. Keller, John McHugh and 
Dr. A. J. Bonneville, were appointed to work with the 
trustees for remodeling and removal to the lower floor. 

The alterations were, of necessity, restricted as we had 
but $1500 at our disposal. The book shelves were rebuilt 
down stairs, a new wall finish applied, and the floors covered 
with inlaid linoleum. 

The historical exhibit was placed upstairs. 

We now have a light, attractive library with no added 
cost to the town. 



42 

Beginning with the first week in February we are open 
from 3 to 5 on Tuesdays and Saturdays and from 7 to 9 on 
Thursdays. 

The following rules will be enforced. 

Books may be kept for two weeks and may be re- 
newed for the same period, new books of fiction, excepted. 

A fine of five cents a week, or fraction thereof, will be 
charged for overdue books. 

No books will be loaned to any person incurring such 
a fine until it has been paid. 

The date on which a book is due will be found stamped 
on a slip in the back of the book. 

Only one new book of fiction will be allowed to each 
person. 

Each borrower is held responsible for all books bor- 
rowed in his name and all fines accruing on the same. 

We wish to express our appreciation to the Library 
Association for their generous gift; to the committee who 
helped the trustees, especially Mr. McHugh who looked 
after the work; and to Miss E. Louise Jones of the division 
of public libraries of the State House, Boston, who came 
to help discard and arrange the books. 

An association of which Miss Jones is secretary has 
given a librarian's charging desk. Miss Jones and her 
assistant will come again, without cost to the town, to re- 
catalogue the non-fiction and give further aid to the lib- 
rarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 
KATHERINE H. MULLANY, 
MARY C. DAY, 

Trustees. 



43 
REPORT OF TOWN HALL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Receipts and payments, from funds raised by the Com- 
mittee, Town Hall Rents, and Donations. 



RECEIPTS 




From Opening Day Dance 


$ 670.00 


Sale of Program Space 


1,317.50 


McEnelly's Dance 


57.17 


Town Hall Rents 


340.00 


Donation for Community Room Furniture 


10.00 


Donation for Mirror 


1.00 


PAYMENTS 




Cost of Printing Programs and Cut 


$402.39 


McEnelly's Orchestra 


275.00 


Stage Curtain 


350.00 


Labor Cleaning 


48.25 


Supplies, Miscellaneous and Exp. Chgs. 


71.53 


Labor and Materials, painting basement 


312.00 


Connecting Electric Range 


57.57 


Other electrical work 


96.83 


Janitor, 14 wks. @ $18.00 per wk. 


252.00 


Furniture for Community Room 


243.90 


Light and Power 


61.67 


Police, opening night, and extra at dances 


50.00 


Foster-Farrar, Equipment and supplies 


48.60 


J. A. Sullivan, Equipment and supplies 


44.28 



$2,396.67 



$2,314.02 
Balance on hand $ 82.65 



44 

The Building Committee wish to express their thanks and 
appreciation to all those that assisted them in soliciting adver- 
tisements for the Souvenir Program, for the Dedication Exer- 
cises, and otherwise assisted in making the occasion a success. 
We are also very grateful to the following for their generous 
gifts and donations to the New Memorial Hall: 

Amherst Gas Co. — Electric Range. 

Women's Endeavor — Upright Piano for the Community Room. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Day — Large flag. 

Holy Trinity Parish — Kitchen Sinks, and 100 piece set of 

dishes. 
Mrs. James L. Day — Potted plant, Palm. 
Miss Mrion C. Billings — $10.00 for Community Room furniture 

fund. 
Girls Dancing Club — $1.00 for Mirror Fund. 
Mrs. Jane P. Ryan — Large potted plant, Aspidistra. 
John C. Ryan — Two large rubber door mats. 
Mrs. W. L. Belden — Oak table for Comunity Room. 
W. L. Belden — Flag pole. 
Smith Academy Athletic Association — Showers. 

A number of the societies and clubs in town have plans 
under way to raise money for further equipment and furnish- 
ings for the hall. 

DANIEL P. SHEEHAN, Chairman. 

JOSEPH PORADA, 

WILLIAM L. BELDEN, 

JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

JOHN C. RYAN, 

ALEX DONNIS, 

WILLIAM H. DICKINSON, 

Town Hall Building Committee. 



45 



List of persons who served in the Army and Navy during 
the World War, as a credit to the Town of Hatfield, from the 
Office of The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C. 



Theodore Ancewicz 
Peter L. Balise 
Curtis F. Bardwell 
Lester Hayes Beals 
Joseph Bielicki 
Walter F. Birmingham 
Joseph Bokun 

William Bokun 
Anthony Boltruczyk 
Alfred J. Bonneville 
Earl Breor 

James H. Day 
John Leonard Day 
John G. Deinlein 
Edward S. Dickinson 
George Eberlein, Jr. 
William F. Englehardt 

John J. Fortsch 

Julius Gavelek 
Otto Geis 
Ercent E. Godin 

Earnest Arthur Godin 

Harold C. Gore 

Frederick C. Graves 
Walter L. Graves 

Carlton A. Harris 
Homer J. Holt 



Company B, 327th Infantry 
Company K, 103rd Infantry 
Company A, 74th Infantry 
Medical Corps, Hospital #4 
Company K, 326th Infantry 
Company B, 315th Engineers 
5th Company, 2nd Battalion, 

151st Depot Brigade 
Battery B, 319th- Field Artillery 
Battery A, 320th Field Artillery 
Medical Corps 
Battery B, 29th Artillery, 

Coast Artillery Corps 
9th Infantry 
Air Service 

171st Areo Squadron, Air Service 
Company C, 74th Infantry 
151st Depot Brigade 
Company A, 36th Machine Gun 

Battalion 
Repair Unit 320th Motor 

Transport Corps 
Battery B, 321st Field Artillery. 
Battery F, 321st Field Artillery 
Veterinary Hospital, 

1st Veterinary Corps 
304th Ambulance Company, 

301st Sanitary Train 
Company B, 12th Train 

Headquarters and Military Police 
Company D, 302nd Supply Train 
Company B, 312th Field Signal 

Corps 
Motor Transport Corps 699. 
Field Artillery Replacement Draft 



46 



Stanley Joinrog 
George P. Kelly 
John J. Kilday 
John J. Kozash 
Joseph Krolokoski 
Joseph Kuras 
Maik Kuzrawa 
Paul A. Levitre 
William J. Lizek 
Edward J. Majeskey 
John Markowski 
George M. Mullins 

Frank E. Murphy 

John P. Murphy 

Roman Nartowicz 
Charles Carl Ney 
Antonio Niksa 
John J. Norton 
Joseph Preslo 
Arthur J. Proulx 
Everett S. Richards 
Charles Ryan 
Dewey Ryan 
Matthew B. Ryan 
Stanley Sadoski 
Victor Sanna 

John T. Shea 
George W. Shirk 
Egnot Sluchas 
Joseph Smalick 
Peter J. Small 
Harold J. Smith 
William J. Smith 



Company E, 16th Infantry 
304th Guard and Fire Company 
152nd Depot Brigade 
151st Depot Brigade 
Battery A, 320th Field Artillery 
Company F, 22nd Infantry 
Battery B, 319th Field Artillery 
Battery F, 319 Field Artillery 
Ordinance Department 
Company EL 23rd Infantry 
Troop H, 11th Cavalry 
Machine Gun Company, 

74th Infantry 
Supply Company 

11th Field Artillery 
1st Battery, Field Artillery 

Emplacement Regiment 
Company K, 325th Infantry 
156th Depot Brigade 
Company B, 59th Infantry 
Company I, 104th Infantry 
Company D, 16th Infantry 
4th Company, 151st Depot Brigade 
27th Infantry 

Students Army Training Corps 
Students Army Training Corps 
Motor Transport Corps 794 
Company G, 18th Infantry 
Headquarters Company, 

16th Infantry 
Headquarters, 301st Sanitary Train 
Medical Corps 
Company L, 41st Infantry 
Company M, 60th Infantry 
Company K, 325th Infantry 
Battery D, 18th Field Artillery 
Machine Gun Company, 

42nd Infantry 



47 



John J. Steele 
John F. Stenglein 
John L. Stenglein 
John E. Striplin 
Stanley Szelko 
Steve E. Vachula 

Henry C. Wickles 
Anthony Wlotkowski 

Roswell Earl Hubbard 
Frank Benedict Karakula 



151st Depot Brigade 

3rd Company Coast Artillery 

Field Artillery, Replacement Depot 

Battery F, 79th Field Artillery 

Company E, 328 Infantry 

12th Train, Headquarters 

and Military Police 
151st Depot Brigade 
Company L, 325th Infantry 
U. S. Navy 
United States Naval Reserve Force 
United States Navy 



In addition to the foregoing, the following names are taken 
from the Honor Roll List of Hatfield Citizens that served in the 
World War. 



Czslaw Arbaszenski 
Homer F. Bard well 
Alfred Benoit 
Franciszek Bielecki 
Marion C. Billings 
John Butcella 
Jacob Engelhardt 
Stanislaw Garboski 
George V. Gies 
Stanley Golanzeski 
Frank O. Gowash 
Herman L. Harris 
Philip Harris 
Paul Holich, Jr. 
William E. Holt 
Stanley Jablonski 
Klemes Korza 
Joseph Kozash 
Herman LaMontagne 
Roman Maiekut 
Earl D. McGrath 



John J. Monahan 
Charles D. Morton 
Thomas Murphy 
John F. Muscillo 
Toefil Natorwitcz 
Leonard Ormond 
Joseph Parent 
Robert Proulx 
Edward F. Reno 
Wicenty Sarnac 
Anthony Scostak 
Alexander Sevies 
John Skorupski 
Joseph Smith 
Edward Smith 
Leo M. Stowell 
Aleksander Szutowicz 
Wladyslad Tobara 
John Vachula 
Marcel Wendolowski 
Frederick Wishaway 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



School Committee 



OP THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



For the Year Ending Dec. 31, 1930 



49 



51 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joseph F. Chandler, Chairman Term expires 1933 

J. Henry Charlebois, Secretary Term expires 1931 

Francis W. Lovett Term expires 1932 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Orion A. Morton 

19 Bates St., Northampton Telephone 1088 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M.D. (Center and North Hatfield Schools) 
C. A. Byrnes, M.D. (Hill and West Hatfield Schools) 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur R. Breor 



SCHOOL CENSUS 






October 1, 


1930 








Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Between 5 and 7 years 


47 


64 


111 


Between 7 and 14 years 


256 


249 


505 


Between 14 and 16 years 


66 


75 


141 



Totals 369 388 757 



52 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary and Smith Academy 

First Winter Term — 7 weeks Opens January 5, 1931 

Closes February 20, 1931 

Second Winter Term — 7 weeks Opens March 2, 1931 

Closes April 17, 1931 

Spring Term — 8 weeks Opens April 27, 1931 

Closes June 19, 1931 

Fall Term — 16 weeks Opens September 8, 1931 

Closes December 24, 1931 

First Winter Term Opens January 4, 1932 

No school no legal holidays and Good Friday. 

Schools close Wednesday noon of Thanksgiving week and 
reopen the following Monday. 

Schools close Thursday noon of Christmas week and reopen 
Monday, January 4, 1932. 

When a legal holiday occurs on Sunday the following Mon- 
day is observed as a holiday. 

Legal holidays in Massachusetts include January first, 
February twenty-second, April nineteenth, May thirtieth, July 
Fourth, the first Monday in September, October Twelfth, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. 



53 



Report of School Committee 



To the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield: 

The town has a large school enrolment in comparison with 
other towns of similar valuation and population. While the total 
cost is rather high, the cost per pupil is less than the cost per 
pupil in any other similar town in the State. 

Our relative position has not changed much from that of 
last year for which figures were given. We have 31 more pupils 
in the eighth grades than last year. As a large percent of these 
will enter the Academy next September, the freshman class 
should have from 60 to 70 members. This will be about twice 
the size of any entering class in recent years. The entering class 
will be large during the next four years as there are two fifth, 
two sixth two seventh and two eighth grades in the Center school 
and about the same number as usual in the outlying schools. 
Those entering the first primary grades last year numbered 93. 
This year there were 63. The estimate for next September is 
about 43. 

An unexpected expenditure this last year was the new fur- 
nace at West Hatfield. When examined during the summer, it 
was found that the old furnace was so badly out of repair that 
a new one had to be installed. 

Outside gas tanks and inside fixtures were installed for use 
in the physical and chemical laboratory. This adds much to the 
efficiency of this department from the standpoint of the individu- 
al members who now have greater opportunity for experiment- 
ation and observation. 

The interior of the Bradstreet school was thoroughly re- 
paired and minor repairs were made on other buildings. As the 
condition of practically all the windows at Bradstreet school is 



54 

very poor, new windows should be purchased and the exterior 
woodwork painted. 

The new commercial department seems popular and doing 
excellent work. 

The promotion of the agricultural instructor, Mr. Burke, to 
the principalship of the Academy and the election of Mr. Dillon, 
as assistant, that the agricultural project work might not be af- 
fected by the change, will, without doubt, give general satisfac- 
tion as the organization develops. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH F. CHANDLER, 
J. HENRY CHARLEBOIS, 
FRANCIS W. LOVETT. 



55 



Financial Statement 

1931 



ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR SCHOOLS 



General Administration: 






Superintendent 


$ 1,700.00 




Attendance Officer 


400.00 




School Committee 


200.00 




Stationery, printing, postage 


140.00 




Telephone 


100.00 




Travel 


220.00 




Miscellaneous 


40.00 


$ 2,800.00 






Teachers' Salaries: 






Supervisors 


2,900.00 




Academy 


8,250.00 




Vocational 


4,800.00 




Elementary 


23,900.00 


39,850.00 






Text Books and Supplies: 






Academy 


1,400.00 




Vocational 


300.00 




Elementary 


2,200.00 


3,900.00 






Transportation : 






Academy 


1,080.00 




Elementary 


550.00 


1.630.00 



56 

Janitors : 

Academy 850.00 

Elementary 2,500.00 

3,350.00 

Fuel and Light: 

Academy 1,000.00 

Elementary 2,700.00 

— 3,700.00 

Repairs: 

Academy 100.00 

Elementary 900.00 

1,000.00 

Athletics : 

Academy 200.00 

Elementary 60.00 

260.00 

Miscellaneous : 

Academy 100.00 

Elementary 300.00 

400.00 

$56,890.00 



57 



Report of Supt. of Schools 



To the School Committee, Parents and Citizens: 

During 1980, it is probably true that Hatfield moved for- 
ward farther in civic values and appreciation than any other 
town in the Commonwealth of similar size. The New Memorial 
Town Hall has already shown the important place which it is to 
fill in the educational program of the town. Its location and gen- 
eral arrangement make it of uncommon value to all the schools. 
It is surely meeting adequately a long felt need. The schools 
have shown a spirit of appreciation, cooperation and progress in 
keeping with the new opportunities offered. 

A new cycle in the development of the Academy began in 
September. The Board of Trustees constructed two rooms on the 
third floor, by dividing the assembly hall, for the new commercial 
department. New furniture and equipment were installed. Nine 
of the twenty-one students of the junior class elected commercial 
subjects as their major studies and six more of the same class 
elected one or more commercial branches. Eleven seniors elect- 
ed one or more commercial subjects in connection with their 
regular senior work. This new development has broadened the 
curriculum of the Academy which now offers as many opportun- 
ities to the students of the town as any high school of its size in 
the State. 

The agricultural department has continued the high grade 
of work which has characterized it in the past. This department 
has not only trained experts in agricultural lines through its 
judging teams, but has brought all the members in touch with 
local, state and national activities that will be of inestimable 
value to them in later life. While the department is not large, it 
is worth to the town many times its cost. 

If there is any one branch in a high school that should be 



58 

required of every girl, it is a course in household arts or home 
management. While work in this department is elective, the 
change from a four-year course to a two-year course has intensi- 
fied the work and enabled the instructor to cooperate in the home 
project activities in a more efficient manner. The canning club 
work which was done last summer and will be continued next 
summer as an auxiliary to this department is a real contribution. 

The athletic association is well organized and in fine work- 
ing condition. A high type of sportsmanship has been manifest- 
ed in all the different lines of activity. The recent reports in the 
Christmas issue of the "Purple and White Echo" reflected the 
spirit that has marked the contests. 

The large number of extra-curriculum activities that have 
been organized to meet the different aptitudes and intellectual 
trends of groups of individuals have made it possible for nearly 
every pupil to find just the activity most interesting and profit- 
able. 

The elementary schools have made steady progress. The 
teachers have been unceasing in their efforts and have maintained 
a high type of school spirit. The large majority of children al- 
ways enjoy working hard if the social atmosphere of the school 
is congenial. 

Last September, all grades from the third to the eighth, in- 
clusive, were supplied with the Standard Service Arithmetics. 
The superintendent, teachers and children are very enthusiastic 
over the content, methods used and the results that are being 
achieved. 

For several years, the writer gave oral and written tests 
based on the text-books used and reported to the teachers the 
standing of each class in the Union. These tests gave the teach- 
ers information that enabled them to compare the standing of 
their own classes with all other classes of similar grade within 
the Union. This method was stimulating and valuable, but did 
not show just where our schools stood in comparison with the 
schools in other sections. The next step was to give Standard 



59 



tests compiled for and given in all types of schools within the 
New England States. The results have been given in previous 
reports. In nearly every fundamental study, the schools in the 
Union ranked above the standards. Whenever a study dropped 
below, the reasons were studied and methods readjusted until 
the scores were brought up to standard. The local achievements 
were then measured by several different standard tests compiled 
for the schools of the extreme western and middle western states 
and results checked as to content covered and results achieved. In 
over 95% of all these results, the local schools have surpassed 
the standards set. 

In May, 1930, a single scientific and comprehensive Na- 
tional system of testing was adopted for a full year. Three dif- 
ferent tests have already been given — May, November and De- 
cember. The results of these tests are given below. Under each 
grade, the number at the left in each pair set off by colons is the 
National Standard Score for the grade. The number at the right 
in each pair is the average score for all the children in Hatfield 
in each grade. These numbers do not correspond to percentages, 
but are scientifically computed as the standard score for that 
particular grade and test. The first tabulations below were the 
results for last May. The eighth grade pupils took all five tests 
in one day. The history and geography tests came last and the 
history test was a very difficult one. 



Results of May Tests. 



Grades 
Reading 
Spelling 
Arithmetic 
History 
Geography 
English 



15-16 
15-22 
16-18 

28- 8 
24-18 
27-30 



7 


6 


5 


4 


: 51-45 


44-43 


26-33: 


27-33: 


: 83-92 


68-76 


57-67: 


45-54: 


: 25-28 


20-25 


35-47: 


25-36: 


: 23-35 


20-30 


15-18 




: 28-28 


22-28 


16-16 





3 
16-18 
28-40 
13-26 



60 



Results of November and December Tests 



Grades 



English 


27-23 


Arithmetic 


21-25 


Geography 


10-12 


Gen. Science 


8-10 


History 


16-21 


Spelling 




Reading 





7 


6 


5 


: 15-24 


27-42 


18- 


29: 


: 30-46 


20-38 


22- 


■27: 


: 16-15 


20-20 


15- 


12: 




6-10 


4- 


■ 7: 



10-23 



11-15: 
31-30: 



10-10 
23-25 



4 
13-19: 
29-20: 
12-12 

9- 8: 

10-14: 
13-17: 



3 
11-15 
29-29 

6- 8 

10-11 
18-19 



WHAT IS SUCCESS? 

It's doing your work the best you can, 

And being just to your fellowman. 

And staying true to your aims and ends 

And making money, but keeping friends. 

It's figuring how and learning why, 

And looking forward and thinking high, 

And dreaming a little, but doing much; 

And keeping always in closest touch 

With what is finest in word and deed. 

It's being thorough, yet making speed; 

It's going onward despite defeat, 

And fighting staunchly yet keeping sweet, 

It's struggling onward with a will to win, 

And taking loss with a cheerful grin. 

It's sharing sorrow and work and mirth; 

And making better this good old earth. 

It's being honest and playing fair, 

And looking up at the stars above ; 

And trusting God's wisdom, mercy and love; 

It's serving and striving through strain and stress, 

It's doing your noblest. That is success. 

— Annonymous . 
In conclusion, I wish to thank the teachers, the supervisors 
and school officials for the excellent spirit of cooperation shown 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
ORION A. MORTON, Superintendent of Schools. 



61 



Principal of Smith Academy 

To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee 
of Town of Hatfield: 

My First annual report as principal of Smith Academy 
covers the period from September 8, 1930 to the present time. 
The opening registration was 94, divided as follows: 15 Seniors, 
20 Juniors, 23 Sophomores, 36 Freshmen. 

Since that time 7 pupils have left school and 4 have en- 
tered. The present enrollment is 91, 52 girls — 39 boys. The per- 
centage of attendance to date is 94.6% as compared to 93% for 
the corresponding period of last year. This record, which ap- 
proximates very closely the average attendance in Massachusetts 
High School, is particularly noteworthy considering the fact 
that in the main the absences are caused by seasonal farm oper- 
ations. 

The Commercial Course installed last September adds an- 
other vocational course to the present broad and diversified 
school curriculum which I now feel allows ample provision for 
developing personality, leadership and other latent abilities. 

Athletics play a very important part in our health program. 
Heretofore, a large proportion of the boys were engaged in some 
form of Athletics, but like opportunities were not available for 
the girls. However, with the opening of the Memorial Town 
Hall, with its many excellent facilities, a varied and beneficial 
health program is being adopted. 

The financial status of the Athletic Association was aided 
considerably the past year, by an appropriation of $200 from 
the school budget, to help defray expenses for equipment, ref- 
erees and transportation. In the past these expenses have been 
wholly paid for by student tax and income from basketball 
games. The student tax was reduced from two dollars to one this 
Fall, as a result of the above-mentioned appropriation. 



62 

The following extra-curricular activities are being carried 
on successfully at the present time; the publishing of the Purple 
and White Echo, orchestra, dancing classes, inter-class and 
school singing, strummers, Dramatic Club, French Clubs, 4-H 
Clubs. The above activities develop qualities that make for citi- 
zenship, leadership and cooperation. 

I am mindful of the loyal support accorded me, and advice 
rendered, by the Superintendent, School Committee and mem- 
bers of the Smith Academy Faculty, for which I am duly ap- 
preciative. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD J. BURKE, 

Principal. 



63 



Report of Music Supervisor 



The plan of music education is to teach our boys and girls 
to read music fluently, to sing musically and to listen intelligent- 
ly. We must lead the children to love good music and to appre- 
ciate the many qualities of beauty represented in this art. 

The aims in the primary grades are, to give the child the 
use of his singing voice; cure the monotones, far as possible; to 
develop song singing and song repetory and to give preparation 
and practise in the principals and reading of music. We con- 
tinue the development of ability power and knowledge through 
the upper grades to the high school where the student body sing 
four part chorus work with some degree of ability. The Memori- 
al Day assembly this year, as in past years was the outstanding 
program of all the grades, first to the eighth. In Smith Acad- 
emy, we arranged and prepared programs by the Girls and 
Boys Glee Clubs, the orchestra and chorus, for the various school 
activities, prize speaking contests, plays, Memorial program, ann 
commencement week. 

The splendid spirit of interest and sincere cooperation on 
the part of Mr. Morton, the school committee, principals, teach- 
ers and pupils has been an inspiration, and I express my sincere 
gratitude to them all. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



64 



Supervisor of Penmanship and 
Drawing 



The drawing work for the past year has been very satis- 
factory. The children have developed more skilly more technique 
and are able to handle their materials in a more skillful manner. 

Much time was devoted to illustrative work. The children 
like this part of the course the best. The results are more pleas- 
ing to them and unconsciously they grasp proportion, color and 
perspective. They are able to find their own failings*, and to 
criticize their own work. Many of them draw pictures during 
free periods in school, and a number of them do home work. I 
have seen notebooks filled with illustrations of things the child 
is interested in. 

The poster work has been well done. The large paper used 
last year was an incentive for "bigger and better" posters. In 
Hadley, the children were asked to make posters for the Chicken 
Pie Supper. A contest was staged and three prizes were offered 
for the best posters. An outside call for school work which could 
be really helpful, stimulated great enthusiasm. Everyone want- 
ed to be in the contest. 

According to psychologists, habits are formed as a result of 
repeated acts. Then the acts should be checked up so that the 
right habits may be formed. Our aim this year has been to spend 
more time on correlation work and to try to secure good writing 
at all times. 

I feel sure that some of our pupils do not use arm move- 
ment altogether unless the penmanship program is tied up with 
each of the other subjects. As long as the pupils are permitted 
to use arm movement in class drill work and the teacher knows 
what not in other subjects, we cannot establish correct writing 
habits. The pupils writing in other subjects should be graded, 



65 

the grade to be averaged into the regular class work grade. 
Then the pupils exercise more care in writing themes, notebooks, 
etc. I think most of the teachers realize the importance of the 
carry over of the writing work and are making every effort to 
encourage the children in this direction. 

It is interesting and encouraging to compare the work of 
our boys and girls with that of others who enter from other 
towns. Their writing is so small, cramped, and illegible that it 
is a joy to compare even the poorest of our work with their best. 

The pupils in grades six, seven and eight were allowed to 
work for pins and certificates. It was entirely optional on their 
part. The rewards are as follows: Final Certificates. 26; Busi- 
ness Certificates, 9; Progress Pins, 6; Palmer Pins, 7. 

In one of the Hadley eighth grades, a class of forty pupils 
received thirty-five final certificates and one business certificate. 
The class was of average grade, and showed marked advance- 
ment during the year. Under proper guidance their interest was 
stimulated and they worked diligently until their work reached 
a high standard. 

In closing this report, I wish to thank Mr. Morton for his 
generous support, the principals and teachers for their kindly 
cooperation in the work of the past year. 

BERNICE B. ORMOND. 



66 



Supervisor of Health Education 



The school Hygiene Program was carried on during the 
year with increasing emphasis on the subject of Health Educa- 
tion. It is the purpose of this program to interest and instruct 
the boys and girls of the public schools to assume a responsibil- 
ity of their own well-being, insofar, as it is reasonable and prac- 
tical ; to teach them by practice of good daily health habits, and 
in the upper grades, by more scientific knowledge the value of 

"A Healthy Mind in A Healthy Body" 

In order to check up on this program the Gates-Strang 
Health Knowledge Test approved by Health teachers in Colum- 
bia University was given to different groups and results tabu- 
lated as follows: 

Maximum 64 High Low Aver. Stan. Median for grade 8 

Centre school 57 33 47 46 " " " 

Bradstreet school 52 48 50.2 46 " " " 

N. Hatfield school 54 37 45 46 " " " 

W. Hatfield school 54 49 52.3 46 " " " 

Grade 7 High Low Aver. Stan.Median for grade 7 

Bradstreet school 57 40 45 42 " " " 

N. Hatfield school 55 40 49 42 " " " 

W. Hatfield school 50 40 45 42 " " " 

Grade 6 High Low Aver. Stan.Median for grade 6 

Bradstreet school 51 40 45 42 " " " 

N. Hatfield school 58 41 48 42 " " " 

W. Hatfield school 52 40 46 42 " " " 

Grade 5 High Low Aver. Stan.Median for grade 5 

Bradstreet school 51 40 37 30 " " " 

N. Hatfield school 52 33 43 30 " " " 

W. Hatfield school 52 32 43.4 30 " " " 



67 

Grade 4 High Low Aver. Stan. Median for grade 4 

Bratstreet school 36 8 28 22 " " " 

N.. Hatfield school 45 18 30 22 " " " 

W. Hatfield school 45 27 37 22 " " " 

High school group, Biology and Hygiene classes. 

High 60 Low 48 Average 53.5 

The results of these tests give the teacher the opportunity 
to know where Health Knowledge is well grounded and where 
further instruction is needed. 

The surest foundation of good health is the knowledge and 
practice of good daily habits and on this level even the lower 
grades were high, but the upper grades did not do as well on 
the knowledge of food values and their relation to proper growth, 
and on Sanitation, also an important phase of Health Know- 
ledge. Rules for safety on street and highways were included 
in this test. The children are taught and cautioned daily on the 
subject of Safety on the Highways. 

As this test was designed for High schools and Colleges as 
well as lower forms, some of the questions were not relative to 
Elementary school health teaching and much credit is due the 
teachers for the interest and time spent in putting over to the 
pupils such sound essential knowledge. 

The Health Education in the High School is given in cor- 
relation with the Home Economic Dept. 

The Freshmen Group Outline (30 periods) 

1 Review of Elementary School Hygiene by the Stanford 
Achievement Tests and Original Tests and recitation (8 
periods). 

2 Personal Hygiene. 

3 Mental Hygiene and review of the Nervous System. 

4 General Review. 

5 Hygiene applied to methods of Sanitation, Ventilation, etc., 
in the home. 

6 Hygiene applied to methods of Municipal Sanitation in re- 
gard to good Water and Food Supply, and Public Build- 
ings, etc. 



68 

7 Study of the Germ and Immunization Theory. 

8 Hygiene of Communicable Diseases. 

9 Hygiene of Communicable Diseases and Municipal Control. 

10 Individual Responsibility as regarding Personal and Muni- 
cipal Hygiene. 

1 1 Field Trip to inspect City and Town Water supply. Care of 
rubbish, etc. 

12 Review. 
Part 2 

American Red Cross Junior First Aid Course. 

The Sophomore Group study the American Red Cross out- 
line of Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick. 30 periods. To 
both groups a certificate from the National Headquarters Amer- 
ican Red Cross will be given providing the Course is passed, 
successfully. 

Regardless of all teaching and preventive measures there 
will be a great deal of corrective work to do each year. The 
most marked defect of course is dental, Mal-nutrition very little. 
The morning milk lunch is a feature in all the Elementary 
schools, and the number of apples consumed during the school 
day count up well into the hundreds. 

During the latter part of 1929 a Dental Clinic was held at 

the Centre School for the benefit of the 5th and 6th grades as 

well as for the lower grades and the record of the clinic shows 

the interest the parents and children have in Dental Hygiene. 

No. of pupils treated 227 Amal. fillings 474. Por. fillings 44 

Cement fillings 11, Cleanings 113. 

Extractions per teeth 71, tern, teeth 66. 

As time limited the stay of the dentist, the schools outside 
the centre did not have the advantage of this clinic, but a regis- 
tered Dental Hygienist gave Oral examination and Prophylactic 
treatment to 100 children of the North, West and Bradstreet 
schools. 

Defective vision is a grave concern and 15 children were 
fitted to glasses. The use of the Audiometer for testing accuracy 
of hearing is available to all children above the 2nd grade. The 
Hampshire County Red Cross chapter has extended the privilege 



69 

of the clinic for deafened children to all found deafened to a 
degree inability to do good school work. This clinic is free of 
expense to any child not financially able to employ a private 
physician. The clinic is in charge of a well known specialist. 

Two girls attended the Hampshire County Public Health 
Camp Hodgkins and improved greatly. Both were found to have 
symptoms of incipient tuberculosis and were referred to their 
family physician, and are under careful supervision by the phys- 
ician. This opportunity for health building was made possible 
to these children free of charge by the annual sale of Christmas 
Seals and is a project worthy of the heartiest cooperation of all 
citizens interested in Child Welfare. 

The ever present troublesome tonsils cause a good deal of 
the loss of school time and 11 children were cared for during 
the summer. It is the custom of the School Hygiene Dept. to 
have all children successfully vaccinated before entering school 
in September. This is done by the family physician who also 
makes note of any defect that may be present. The child is again 
checked up in September at school. 

Probably due to the open air environment and good home 
care the first grade child presents a good bill of health. The 
data given shows the health rating of the child entering school 
for the first time 1930. 

The group rating 'A' is for children as nearly physically fit 
as can be expected. The 'B' group have minor defects incident to 
their age, such as temporary teeth too good to lose and not safe 
to fill, slightly enlarged tonsils but no history of sore throat or 
colds, good hygiene not firmly established, etc., not one in any 
way detrimental to health or school progress. The 'C group 
have positive defects. 

School No. A B C 



1 Nutrition, 1 heart lesion 
diseased tonsils 
enlarged tonsils 



W. Hatfield 


2 


2 






N. Hatfield 


3 


3 






Bradstreet 


14 


10 


2 


2 


School 


18 


12 


4 


2 


Hill 


10 


3 


5 


2 



70 

One of the pleasant features of this check up, was the beau- 
tiful teeth of the children. Few had the 6 year molar well de- 
veloped, but the majority had good temporary teeth, at an age 
when the temporary teeth are decaying or dropping out. This is 
the result of good wholesome diet as well as good Oral Hygiene. 

It is due to the interest of the parents, teachers, superin- 
tendent and school committee in the welfare of the school child 
that makes the work of the Health Dept. an interesting and 
worth while duty, to the Physician and Health Worker and to 
whom a sincere appreciation is extended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN HOLMES, R.N. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 

For the Year Ending ■ 
DECEMBER 31 



93 



1 




Anker Printing Co., 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 
For Town Meeting, February 15, 1932 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Hatfield, in said County; Greetings; — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and town affairs 
to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 
15th day of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then 
and there to act on the following articles. 

Article 1. To elect a Moderator to preside in said meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year. Moderator, Town Clerk, Three Selectmen, One 
Assessor for three years, One Member of the Board of Water 
Commissioners for three years, Town Treasurer, One Member 
of the Library Committee for three years, One Member of the 
School Committee for three years, Tree Warden, Tax Collector, 
Elector under the Will of Oliver Smith, Six Constables, all of 
the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon and 
kept open at least four hours, and for such longer time as the 
majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no case will 
they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the evening. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of various town officers and 
committees. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

3 



Article 5. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to pay School House Note No. 32, and 
interest amount required 32,135.00 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to accept the pro- 
visions of Chapter 81 of the General Laws, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same, amount recommended. . . .35,750.00 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the ordinary repairs and maintenance of 
highways, bridges, sewers, sidewalks, and equipment, amount 
recommended £3,000.00 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of the bonds of town officers, 
amount recommended £220.00 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of the Memorial Room at Dickinson 
Memorial Hall, amount recommended £25.00 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the inspection of animals, barns, and slaught- 
ering, amount recommended £300.00 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for Tree and Moth work, amounts recommended, 
for tree work £800, moth work £150, total for both £950.00 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the maintenance of the Fire Department, 
amount recommended £1,000.00 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for insurance, amount recommended £700.00 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Public Welfare, amount recommended. . . .£5,000.00 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for interest, amount recommended £700.00 

4 



Salaries 


Expenses 


3300.00 


?100.00 


100.00 




500.00 


90.00 


600.00 


50.00 


800.00 


10.00 


850.00 


25.00 


800.00 


80.00 


150.00 


50.00 


150.00 


' 30.00 



Article 16. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate the following amounts for salaries and expenses of town 
officers for the ensuing year. 

Selectmen 3300.00 

Clerk of Board of Selectmen . . . 

Town Clerk 

Town Treasurer 

Town Accountant 

Assessors 

Tax Collector, 1% of levy, estab- 
lished at 

Sealer of Weights & Measures . . 
Election & Registration 

34,250.00 3435.00 
Total for both 34,685.00 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate 349,500.00, and re-appropriate from excess and defici- 
ency 33,100.00 for the maintenance of the schools for the en- 
suing year, total amount recommended 352,500.00 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the employment of one or more School Phys- 
icians, amount recommended 3200.00 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of cemeteries and new fence for the 
Main Street Cemetery, amount recommended 3300.00 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for Memorial Day, amount recommended 3125.00 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the maintenance of the Public Library, amount 
recommended 31,200.00 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the payment of the tuition of Hatfield students 
at Smith's Agricultural school, amount recommended 31,500.00 

Ten students attending January 1st, 1932. 

5 



Article 23. To see if the vote to raise and appropriate 
money for police protection and equipment for the ensuing 
year, amount recommended 52,500.00 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to re-appropriate 
from the Excess and Deficiency account the sum of 3600.00 for 
Reserve Fund, recommended. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for unclassified accounts, amount recommended 

3200.00 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for attorney's fees, amount recommended $400.00 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the care of the Town Hall, amount recom- 
mended 32,000.00 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for Soldiers Aid and Relief, amount recom- 
mended 3500.00 

Total appropriations and re-appropriations recom- 
mended 386,490.00 

Less re-appropriations 3,700.00 

Total amount to be raised by taxation 382,790.00 

If the amounts recommended by your finance committee 
are not increased, there will be a substantial reduction in the 
tax rate. 

ROBERT L. BELDEN, 
JOHN W. MULL1NS, 
DEWEY J. RYAN, 

Finance Committee. 



Article 29. To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money from the available water revenue of 1931 and 
prior to pay Town Hall notes due April 1st, 1932 and interest, 
amount of note 35,000.00 Interest 32,337.50. Total amount 
asked for 37,337.50 



Article 29a. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Street Lights, or act anything thereon. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate $2,000. 00, and appropriate from the available 
water revenue of 1931 and prior 31,000.00 for the Water De- 
partment 53,000.00 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 

Article 32. To revise and accept the list of jurors sub- 
mitted by the Selectmen. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
money for the fire truck delivered to the town following a vote 
to purchase a fire truck passed at special town meeting held 
May 25, 1931. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to establish a 
Road Machinery Account, to which shall be credited all receipts 
received for the use or rental of road machinery, the proceeds 
to be appropriated as voted by the town for road machinery 
purposes, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
a sum of money to establish a Road Machinery Fund for the 
purpose of purchasing, repairing and operating road mach- 
inery. 

Article 36. To see if the town will vote to change the 
method of electing its Board of Selectmen from three every year 
to one each year beginning at the next Annual Town Meeting 
in 1933, or act any thing thereon. 

Article 37. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from the excess and deficiency account $150.68 for revenue 
deficit in 1930. 



And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting attested copies thereof in five public places in said town 
seven days before time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 30th day of January in the 
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred thirty-two. 

DANIEL P. SHEEHAN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 
JOSEPH V. PORADA, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Hatfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen: 

1 submit herewith the report of your Town Accountant 
for the year ending December 31, 1931. 



RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 

Tax Levies— Previous years 229,753.23 

Current year, poll 1,286.00 

Current year, excise 3,925.32 

Current year, personal and real. . 41,900.67 

Current year, old age 539.00 



277,404.22 



From the Commonwealth: 

Income Taxes 1931 318,285.00 

Corporation Tax Business 1,990.13 

Corporation Electric Light Co. . 319.13 

Corporation Railroad, Tel. & Tel. 321.32 

Corporation Bank & Trust Co. . . 80.71 

Corporation Bank & Trust Co. 1930 3.56 

Massachusetts School Fund 3,668.28 

Union Superintendent 960.87 

High School 3,596.95 

Gasoline Tax 1,150.00 



330,375.95 



License Fees and Permits: 

Gasoline, alcohol, auto $33.00 

Junk and Fruit. 60.00 

Pool 8.00 

Sewer entrance 33.00 

Wild West Show 2.00 



Court Fines: 

District Court and Jail $403.20 



From County Treasurer: 

Dog Tax .' $246.56 

Northampton Water Works: 

In lieu of taxes, on reservoir land $51.15 



$136.00 



$403.20 



$246.56 



$51.15 



Total general revenue $108,617.08 

DEPARTMENTAL 

Inspector and Sealer's Fees $81.75 

Highways : 

Use of cement mixer and sale of 

materials $59.57 

Truck and roller earnings 744.00 

St. Joseph's Church cleaning ditch 13.60 

From State, Chapter 81 4,550.00 

From State, Chapter 90 2,000.00 

From County, Chapter 90 . . 2,000.00 



$9,367.17 



Charities : 

From Individuals $105.49 

From State, T. B. Subsidy 60.00 

From Mother's Aid 176.66 



10 



$342.15 



Schools: 

City of Boston, Tuition $47.56 

Rent of grounds Wild West Show 10.00 

Sale of School Tickets 5.85 

Library Fines, for nine months $44.05 

Town Treasurer, unclaimed check. . . . $35.21 

Water Department: 

Water rents $5,979.10 

Sale of wood . 137.00 

Cemeteries: 

Sale of lot $.50 

From State, care Hannah W. 

Smith lot 12.00 



$63.41 
$44.05 

$35.21 

$6,116.10 



$12.50 



Interest: 

Northampton National Bank & 

Trust Co. (deposits) $279.30 

Taxes 1,626.34 

Protested check 31.93 

Perpetual Care Funds 194.00 

$2,131.57 

Temporary Loans $50,000.00 

Refund, Registration on Police Car . . 3.00 

Town Hall Committee Fund: 

Balance on hand, Jan. 1, 1931 $684.59 

From Program space 224.02 

From Miss Margaret McGrath, 

Treas 32.20 

From Mrs. Theresa M. Godin, 

Treas 70.83 

11 



From Smith Academy A. A 

From Primary School play 

Committee dance 

Town Hall Fund: 

Balance from sale of land and 

buildings 

Sale of furniture 

Dickinson Memorial Hall (Donation) 
Rent of Town Hall 

Total receipts 

Balance on hand, Jan. 1, 1931. . . 

Total 



£81.75 

82.90 

107.00 



3725.00 
80.00 



31,283.29 



3805.00 

5.00 
476.50 



3179,383.78 
12,862.48 

3192,246.26 



PAYMENTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen: 

Salaries 3300.00 

Expense 87.09 

Clerk of Board of Selectmen: 

Salary 

Town Clerk: 

Salary 3500.00 

Office expense 84.95 

Town Accountant: 

Salary 3800.00 

Office expense, supplies 10.35 



3387.09 
100.00 

3584.95 

3810.35 



12 



Tax Collectors: 

Salary for years 1929, '30, '31 . . 3915.00 
Office expense, supplies and ad- 
vertising 120.86 

M. H. Dwight, balance on 1925, 

'26, '27 410.00 



Assessors: 

Salaries, J. R. McGrath 3545.25 

Salaries, J. E. RafTa 450.00 

Salaries, A. Toczko 204.75 

Expenses 24.23 



Town Treasurer: 

Salary 3600.00 

Expense: 29.48 



31,445.86 



31,224.23 



3629.48 
Attorney's Fees 3338.80 

Election and Registration: 

Salaries, Registrars 320.00 

Salaries, Election Officers 30.00 

Expense 37.66 

387.66 



Town Hall Maint., from Feb. 12, 1931: 

Janitor 3816.44 

Fuel ' 603.37 

Light and Power 248.56 

Janitor supplies 154.85 

Repairs and improvements 124.14 

Police for dances 48.00 

Miscellaneous 1.35 

31,996.71 

Total for General Government 37,822.63 

Bonds of Town Officers 217.50 

13 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police: 

Salary of Chief $51,999.92 

Extra Officers 91.25. 

Telephone 39.97 

Garage rent 35.00 

Equipment and repairs 161.49 

Gas and oil 183.28 

Miscellaneous 83.03 

£2,593.94 

Fire Department: 

Salaries and wages $506.00 

Telephone 9.11 

Fuel and light 10.03 

Repairs . 98.24 

Equipment 304.74 

Hose 300.00 

Storage of hose wagons 45.00 

Gas and oil 16.26 

Registration 1.00 

551,290.38 

Sealer: 

Salary $150.00 

Expense 50.00 

$200.00 

Forestry: 

Moth work, salary 7 wages $155.75 

Expense ] 4.44 

$160.19 

Tree work: 

Salary and wages $653.44 

Supplies and tools 60.79 

$714.23 

Total for Protection $4,958.74 

14 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Inspection of school children 

Inspection of animals, barns and meat 
Inspection expense 



$200.00 

249.37 

50.63 



$500.00 



HIGHWAYS 

General Bridges, Sidewalks, Sewers: 

Salary and wages 

Gravel and stone 

Equipment and repairs 

Gas and oil 

Bridges, wages 

Lumber 

Miscellaneous supplies 

Snow removal (wages and teams) 

Beacon lighting and repairs 

Rent of sand lot (Mrs. Smith) . . . 
Registration 



$580.20 

4.15 

791.20 

424*.57 

137.60 

704.89 

121.05 

221.65 

30.64 

15.00 

3.00 



Chapter 81: 

Salaries, wages, trucks and teams $7,525.39 

Oil and tar 2,327.01 

Stone and gravel 1,060.68 

Culverts 473.73 

Catch-basins 46.25 

Supplies 112.07 

Coal. 16.99 



Chapter 90, Bradstreet Road: 

Salary, wages, trucks and teams. $2,022.47 

Stone and gravel 2,950.84 

Tar 812.80 

Coal 102.27 

15 



$3,033.95 



$11,562.12 



Supplies 

Miscellaneous 

Total for Highways 
Street Lights 



225.20 
5.70 



25,919.28 

220,515.35 
24,641.09 



CHARITIES 

Public Welfare: 

To other cities and towns, gen. aid. . . 2967.65 

To other cities and towns, mother's aid 180.00 

Mother's aid, Hatfield 520.00 

Groceries and provisions 247.95 

Fuel.. 111.99 

Medical attendance 26.00 

Traveling expense 26.50 

Cash 38.28 

Leeds Sanatorium 394.28 

Office supplies .87 



22,513.52 



SCHOOLS 

General Administration: 

Salary of Committee for 1930-1931 
Salary of Supt. (part year) .... 

Salary, Nurse 

Salary, enforcement officer .... 
Committee supplies (magazine) 
Printing, postage, stationery. . 

Telephone 

Traveling expense 

Census (1930-31) 



1 2400.00 


1,550.03 


999.97 


400.00 


3.00 


116.96 


161.76 


320.62 


50.00 



24,002.34 



16 



Teachers' Salaries: 

High $11,709.69 

Elementary 23,416.07 

Substitutes 543.50 

Manual training 190.00 

Text Books and Supplies: 

High, books ?427.25 

High, supplies 892.85 

Elementary, books 475.30 

Elementary, supplies 867.90 

Commercial, books and supplies 101.67 

Household Arts: 

Supplies $112.83 

Transportation 76.06 

Traveling expense 4.79 

Books and supplies 63.96 

Equipment 51.00 



$35,859.26 



Janitors: 

High $600.00 

Elementary 2,740.93 

Fuel, Light and Power: 

High $986.75 

Elementary 3,194.54 



17 



$2,764.97 



$308.64 



Tuition: 

City of Northampton (Continua- 
tion school) $17.16 

Transportation: 

High $1,158.10 

Elementary ' 277.85 



$1,435.95 



$3,340.93 



$4,181.29 



Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 

Janitors supplies, High $125.90 

Janitors supplies, Elementary . . . 146.68 

Miscellaneous supplies, High. . . . 31.94 

Repairs, Elementary 481.97 

Miscellaneous supplies, Elm 33.35 

£819.84 

Graduation Expenses: 

Diplomas, programs, etc $53.99 

Speaker 25.00 

£78.99 

Total for Schools £52,809.37 

Hatfield Students at Smith's Agricultural School 

Tuition £863.75 

Ten students attending Jan. 1, 1932. 

Tuition, £3.75 per student per 

week. 

LIBRARY 

Salaries: 

Librarian £298.40 

Assistants and branch librarians 120.40 

Books 382.12 

Periodicals. 40.10 

Supplies 70.68 

Postage 2.34 

Janitor 90.62 

Fuel 152.40 

Light 21.90 

Furniture 93.22 

Janitor supplies 19.23 

Repairs 2.90 

Inspection of boiler 5.00 

£1,299.31 

Remodeling Library: 

McCallum Co., floor covering . . . £263.84 

18 



INSURANCE 

Schools 3671.06 

Town Hall 1,656.00 

Tool House . 303.60 

Workmen's compensation 374.64 

Trucks and police car 119.65 

Boiler 44.50 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Band 380.00 

Flags 30.00 



PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 
Water Department: 

Commissioner's salary 3150.00 

Superintendent's salary (part) . . . 96.68 

Postage 5.00 

Survey and maps 293.83 

Labor 2,450.30 

Pipe and fittings 252.33 

Equipment 158.31 

Pine seedlings 123.00 

Purchase of land, protection of 

water supply 500.00 

Collector's bond 5.00 



19 



33,169.45 



3110.00 



SAFETY COMMITTEE EXPENSE 

Signs and markers 369.55 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Printing Town Reports 3144.40 

Delievery of Town Reports 10.58 

Care of town clock 25.00 

Survey of school dyke line 16.25 

Elector salary 10.00 



3206.23 



34,034.45 



CEMETERIES 

Labor, Main St., W. Hatfield and 

North Hatfield $83.92 

INTEREST 

Town Hall Loan 32,44375 

School House Loan 135.00 

Temporary loans 481.64 

$3,060.39 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Town Hall Notes No. 53 to 57 inch $5,000.00 

School House Note No. 31 2,000.00 

Temporary Loan Note No. 114 25,000.00 

Temporary Loan Note No. 115 25,000.00 

$5 7,000.00 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Taxes, State $3,375.00 

Taxes, County 9,788.82 

Taxes, Audit 663.22 

Taxes, Soldiers Exemption 13.50 

Taxes, Parks and Reservations 52.87 

Taxes, Trust Co 7.18 

Taxes, Old Age Assistance. . 693.00 

Perpetual Care Cemetery Funds 206.00 

$14,799.59 

REFUNDS 

Excise Taxes $72.84 

SPECIAL ACCOUNTS 

Dickinson Memorial Hall (Upper Hall) : 

Painting $88.55 

Lumber 5.17 

Miscellaneous labor 61.28 

$155.00 

20 



Town Hall Building Fund: 

Putnam & Steward (balance due) #1,042.90 
Anthracite Coal Burner Corp. 

(stokers) 1,190.00 

McCallum Co., floor covering . . . 18.78 

R. E. Davies & Son, plumbing . . 120.94 



Town Hall Improvement Fund: 

Cookman Lumber Co $53.27 

The Touhey Co., electric work . . 41.00 

Yawman & Erbe Co., bookcases 55.35 

W. L. Graves, electric work 44.53 

Electrolux Co., cleaner 75.00 

Jos. Yarrows, painting 78.00 

Humidors (cash) 5.45 

R. E. Davies & Son, plumbing. . . 47.40 



TOWN HALL COMMITTEE FUND 

Western Counties Electric Co., light 

and power $61.67 

J. Russell Co., hardware and supplies 24.94 

Touhey Elec. Co., equipment 57.57 

Chase & Coolidge Co., supplies 9.25 

Jos. Yarrows, painting 111.65 

J. H. Pierce, paint 34.65 

LaFluer Bros., paint 2.00 

Merrick Lumber Co., paint 141.87 

J. H. Quinn, furniture for community 

room 243.90 

B. J. Shea, payment on piano 200.00 

Foster-Farrer Co., name plates and 

supplies 48.60 

Chilson's Auto Top Shop, pads 81.75 



21 



$2,372.62 



$400.00 



R. E. Davies & Son, showers (balance) $28.46 

J. L. McGrath, police duty , , , 4.00 

$1,050.31 



Total payments $182,771.95 

Cash balance on hand 9,474.31 

$192,246.26 



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28 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1932 



Alfred Allair 
Howard L. Belden 
Roswell G. Billings 
John B. Bitner 
Fred T. Bardwell 
William P. Boyle 
Samuel F. Billings 
James F. Donlin 
John Donnis 
Michael Hayes 
Philip Harris 
Ercent Godin 
James L. McGrath 
Charles Klekot 
Harry E. Graves 
Murray B. Graves 
Richard F. Fitzgerald 
Joseph Liebl 
John Stoddard 
John F. Sheehan 
John L. Sheehan 
Henry Wolfram 
Leonard Vollinger 
John L. Stenglein 
George A. Deinlein 
Charles Pfiffer 
Malcolm Crawford 
Michael Yarrows 
Alexander T. Rogalewski 
John M. Wentzel 



29 



Treasurer's Report 

Francis W. Lovett, Treasurer, in account with 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance in Treasury, Jan. 1, 1931. . . . 312,862.48 

Receipts for the year 1931 179,383.78 

8192,246.26 

Payments 1931, per warrants $182,771.95 

Balance December 31, 1931: 

Northampton Bank & Trust Co. . . . 9,359.48 

Cash in office, verified 114.83 

$192,246.26 

Northampton National Bank & Trust Co.: 
Balance December 31, 1931, per bank 

statement $10,555.33 

Balance December 31, 1931, per check 

book $9,359.48 

Outstanding checks Dec. 31 1,195.85 

$10,555.33 



FRANCIS W. LOVETT 



Treasurer. 

I have examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer and 
find them correct as listed. 

MORTON E. WALKER, 
State Accountant. 



30 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 



Income Expense Balance 

Fund 1930 

Hannah W. Smith 316.50 

Augusta Wells 17.76 

Oliver Warner 2.41 

John H. Sanderson 5.00 

Luman M. Moore 10.76 

P.M.Wells 5.74 

Benjamin Waite 3.92 

Abby Dickinson 4.64 

Silas G. Hubbard 12.49 

Levu Graves 7.63 

Lucy L. Morton 14.92 

Charles Smith 5.22 

LemeulB. Field 5.18 

Rufus H. Cowles 5.27 

Charles E. Hubbard 5.54 

Alpheus Cowles 5.07 

James Porter 4.91 

Daniel W. Allis 8.19 

J . H. Howard 4.89 

Fannie M. Burke 4.95 

Charles S. Shattuck 4.95 

Seth W. Kingsley 4.91 

E. S. Warner 

Reuben Belden 5.09 

Theodore Porter 4.77 

Charles L. Graves 4.77 

Roswell Hubbard 4.73 

Cooley D. Dickinson 5.92 

Elijah Bardwell 17.40 

Joseph D. Billings 4.73 



31 



1930 


1930 


?4.00 


3111.53 


10.00 


398.11 


2.00 


53.81 


4.00 


111.39 


8.00 


239.68 


5.00 


127.68 


2.00 


88.65 


3.50 


103.39 


4.00 


283.46 


4.00 


171.83 


4.00 


339.07 


4.00 


116.28 


4.00 


115.53 


4.00 


117.52 


4.00 


123.59 


4.00 


112.90 


4.00 


109.11 


5.00 


183.96 


4.00 


108.74 


4.00 


110.38 


4.00 


110.19 


4.00 


109.05 


8.00 


211.55 




117.28 


4.00 


105.92 


4.00 


105.92 


4.00 


105.28 


5.00 


131.77 


4.00 


396.39 


4.00 


104.76 



Memorial Town Hall, Int. 

Edward C. Billings $29.76 

Augusta Beals 4.82 

Anthony Douglas 3.08 

Received : 

J. E. Porter 4.66 

Jonathan Graves 4.66 

HughMcLeod 4.68 

B.M.Warner 9.70 

Chester Hastings 4.59 

Lucius & Stearns Curtis 12.38 

Perpetual Care Funds Received 

Paid out Care of Lots 

Frary & Gardner, new acct 4.55 

Henry C. Batchellor, new acct. . 4.55 



22.50 


615.36 


•4.00 


106.99 


4.00 


60.14 


4.00 


103.44 


3.50 


103.96 


4.00 


103.88 


4.00 


219.09 


3.50 


102.66 


8.00 


277.09 




206.00 




206.00 


4.00 


100.93 


4.00 


101.18 



F. W. LOVETT, Treasurer. 



32 



Tax Collector's Report 



1929 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Outstanding January 1, 1931 $7,538.15 

Payments to Treasurer $6,647.92 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 890.23 

Cash on hand December 31, 1931. ..... 377.60 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 . $512.63 

1930 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Outstanding January 1, 1931 $27,403.47 

Payments to Treasurer $20,755.08 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 . ...... 5,493.44 

Cash on hand December 31, 1931. 660.75 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 . . $4,832.69 

1931 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Commitment per Warrant $76,996.43 

Payments to Treasurer $43,168.67 

Abatements 6.64 

Transfer to Tax Title 18.68 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 33,461.03 

Cash on hand December 31, 1931 324.41 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 $33,136.62 

1929 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Outstanding January 1, 1931 $71.41 

Payments to Treasurer 10.47 

By Abatements 58.41 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 2.53 

$71.41 

33 



1930 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Outstanding lanuary 1, 1931 $806.80 

Payments to Treasurer $677.41 

By Abatements 18.52 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 110.87 

$806.80 

1931 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Commitment per Warrant $4,741.21 

Payments to Treasurer. $3,925.32 

By Abatements 233.40 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 582.49 

$4,741.21 

1931 OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES 

Commitment per Warrant $693.00 

Payments to Treasurer 539.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 154.00 

$693.00 

INTEREST ON TAXES 

Cash on hand January 1, 1930 $2.14 

Collections 1931: 

Levy 1929 $592.20 

Levy of 1930 630.96 

Levy of 1931 48.24 

Excise 1929 .49 

Excise 1930 10.43 

Excise 1931 23.46 

$1,305.78 

$1,307.92 
Payments to Treasurer $1,307.92 

JOSEPH YARROWS, 

Tax Collector. 

34 



TAXES 1925 
M. H. DW1GHT, Collector 
Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931 per previous 

audit J273.48 

Payments to Treasurer Jan. 1 to March 

27, 1931 $33.18 

Abatements Jan. 1 to March 27, 1931 . . 4.00 

Recommitment March 27, 1931 to James 

L. McGrath, Special Collector 236.30 

$273.48 

JAMES L. McGRATH, Special Collector 
Recommitment March 27, 1931 per 

warrant $236.30 

Payments to Treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 $234.30 

Abatements March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931 2.00 

$236.30 

TAXES 1926 
M. H. DW1GHT, Collector 
Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931 per previous 

audit $833.47 

Payments to Treasurer Jan. 1 to March 

27, 1931 $72.00 

Abatements Jan. 1 to March 27, 1931 . . 409.60 

Recommitment March 27, 1931 to James 

L. McGrath, Special Collector 351.87 

$833.47 

JAMES L. McGRATH, Special Collector 
Recommitment March 27, 1931 per 

warrant $351.87 

Payments to Treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 $349.87 

Abatements March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931 2.00 

$351.87 

35 



TAXES 1927 
M. H. DWIGHT, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931 per previous 

audit , 21,049.65 

Payments to Treasurer Jan. 1 to March 

27, 1931 $179.44 

Abatements Jan. 1 to March 27, 1931. . 67.30 

Recommitment March 27, 1931 to James 

L. McGrath, Special Collector 802.91 

$1,049.65 

JAMES L. McGRATH, Special Collector 
Recommitment March 27, 1931 per 

warrant £802.91 

Payments to Treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 $793.01 

Abatements March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931 9.90 

3802.91 

Interest collected by J. L. McGrath from 

March 28, 1931 to Dec. 31, 1931 $283.99 

Payments to Treasurer from March 28, 

1931 to Dec. 31, 1931 $283.99 



36 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed buildings 31,559,836.00 

Value of assessed land 979,670.00 

Value of assessed real estate 2,539,506.00 

Value of assessed personal estate 314,214.00 

Value of assessed real and personal estate 2,853,720.00 

Rate of tax per $1,000 26.50 

Number of polls assessed 686 

Number assessed old age assistance tax 693 

Number of persons assessed on property 566 

Number of horses assessed 308 

Number of cows assessed 266 

Number of neat cattle assessed 66 

Number of sheep assessed 425 

Number of fowl assessed 435 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 467 

Number of automobiles assessed 653 

Acres of land assessed 8,943 

State tax J53, 375.00 

State audit tax 663.22 

State parks and reservation tax 52.87 

County tax 9,788.82 

Overlayings 1,019.41 

Town tax 96,900.56 

Old age assistance tax 693.00 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income tax $17,626.30 

Excise tax 4,100.00 

Corporation tax 3,167.00 

Bank tax 102.19 

Licenses 100.00 

Fines 800.00 

37- 



Schools £6,300.00 

Highways Chap. 122, Acts of 1931. . 1,150.00 

Old age assistance tax 693.00 

Mothers 1,696.32 

VALUE OF PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Under Chap. 59, General Laws 

Church Property £68,000.00 

Town property 338,900.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery 3,500.00 

Smith Academy 66,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
JOHN E. RAFFA, 
ADOLPH M. TOCZKO, 

Assessors of Hatfield 



38 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 1931 

BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 

Male Female 

January 2 1 

February 1 1 

March 3 

April 1 

May 2 2 

June 1 3 

July 

August 3 1 

September 1 , 

October 

November 

December 

Total 11 11 

BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 

Fathers Mothers 

United States 8 12 

Poland 11 7 

Czecho-Slovakia 2 2 

Lithuania 1 1 

Total 22 22 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



926 


1927 


1928 


1929 


1930 


46 


47 


54 


35 


40 



39 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January. ... 1 First marriage of both 21 

February ... Second of Groom 1 

March Second of Bride 1 

April Youngest Groom 20 

May Oldest Groom. 36 

June ......... 1 Youngest Bridge 17 

July 3 Oldest Bride. . 32 

August Birthplace Groom Bride 

September. . 5 United States 22 22 

October 6 

November . . 6 

December. . . — — 

Total, 22 22 22 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



1931 



Barszcz, Michael 
Fitzgerald, Dennis 
Malinoski, Leonard 
Podmayerski, John 
Walpuk, Alex 
Deinlein, Margaret 
Schwarting, Mary 
Fitzgibbons, Elizabeth A. 
Vollinger, Frank G. 
Dombrowski, Adela 
Holley, Edward 
Total deaths, 22. 



Morton, Mary Kellog 
Lithanstanski, Irene 
Celatka, Alexander 
Kurasiewicz, John 
Sadoski, Joseph 
Harris, Carlton A. 
Smith, Antoinette 
Lemire, Antoinette 
Kapinski, Clara 
Breor, John J. 
Carl, Henry W. 



Oldest person (female) 85 years. 



40 



DOGS LICENSED 

155 Males at £2.00 each 3310.00 

9 Females at $5.00 each 45.00 

?355.00 

Less 164 fees at 20 cents each 32.80 

3322.20 
Paid Treasurer Hampshire County 3322.20 

VERNET H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 



41 



Report of Historical Room Committee 



The committee appointed by the Moderator at the last 
Annual Town Meeting to Redecorate, Restore Order and 
Classify the various articles of historical value in the Dickinson 
Memorial, have completed their work, keeping within the ap- 
propriation provided. Your committee was very fortunate in 
securing the services of Mrs. Clifton Johnson, who with her 
experience in such matters, has classified and arranged these 
objects handed down to us by our ancestors, with artistic skill, 
making the room interesting and attractive to the visitor. 

There is yet more room for other interesting creations 
of Colonial times, and we would be pleased to have more of 
them added as reminders of a past of which we may well be 
proud. 

We would also take the liberty to suggest that the Dick- 
inson Memorial be placed under the supervision of the Library 
Trustees and an appropriation of twenty-five dollars (325.00) 
be made at our coming Town Meeting to provide for any un- 
forseen expenses which may occur during the ensuing year. 

MRS. MARGARET MULLANY, 
MISS MARIAN C. BILLINGS, 
ARTHUR C. BARDWELL, 
DAVID BILLINGS, 

Committee Appointed. 



42 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

January 1, 1931, the library contained 5611 volumes. 
During the year 402 books were added. Of these 120 were 
for children and 282 for adults. 

The circulation of books and magazines for the year was 
4188 in the juvenile department, 10509 in the adult, and 573 
in West Hatfield and Bradstreet, making a total of 15270. 

There are 461 borrowers. 

The rule governing fines was enforced and $60.15 collected. 

The library is open Tuesday and Saturday from 3-5 and 
Thursday from 7-9. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 

Librarian. 



43 



Police Report 



Hatfield, Mass. 
December 31, 1931. 
To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1931, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Total number of arrests 78 

Drunkenness 20 

Automobile Violations 28 

Road Violations 6 

Breaking and Entering 2 

Assault and Battery 5 

Assault with Dangerous Weapon 1 

Larceny 3 

Liquor Violations 3 

Bastardy 2 

Fish and Game 2 

Committed to State Farm 1 

Vagrancy 1 

Rape 1 

Tresspass 1 

Labor Laws 2 



78 



Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



44 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending Dec. 31, 1 93 1 



45 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joseph F. Chandler, Chairman Term expires 1933 

J. Henry Charlebois, Secretary Term expires 1934 

Francis W. Lovett Term expires 1932 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

William E. Hebard 
19 Bates Street, Northampton Telephone 1088 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M. D. C. A. Byrnes, M. D. 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Chief Arthur R. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 

October 1, 1931 

Boys Girls Total 

Between 5 and 7 years 58 46 104 

Between 7 and 14 years 231 225 456 

Between 14 and 16 years 84 86 170 

373 357 730 

47 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Elementary Schools and Smith Academy 

First Winter Term — 8 weeks Opened January 4, 1932 

Closes February 26, 1932 

Second Winter Term — 8 weeks. . . .Opens March 7, 1932 

Closes April 22, 1932 

Spring Term — 6 weeks Opens May 9, 1932 

Closes June 17, 1932 

Fall Term — 16 weeks .Opens September 6, 1932 

Closes December 22, 1932 

First Winter Term of 1933 begins Tuesday, January 3, 1933 

HOLIDAY NOTES 

There will be no sessions of school on holidays and Good 
Friday. 

Schools will close the noon of Wednesday before Thanks- 
giving and re-open the following Monday. 

Holidays legal in Massachusetts are: January first, Feb- 
ruary 22, April 19, May 30, July 4, Labor Day, October 12, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. When a holiday falls on Sunday 
the following Monday will be observed as a holiday. 



48 



Report of School Committee 



To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

Your committee have maintained the same number oj 
school buildings with the same number of teaching positions 
as we reported one year ago. According to reports from our 
superintendent our enrollment at the close of the fiscal year 
was 691 — a reduction of 18 pupils distributed, along the scope 
of the grades. 

We would call your attention, that now the attendance in 
Smith Academy is 135 pupils and that this enrollment may be 
expected to remain constant for the next four years, or until the 
large grades, VI and Vll have been members thereof. With 
this fact in mind, there may be expected to be larger supply and 
textbook costs, in those grades of school, for the obvious reason 
that the more advanced years of school require more material. 

We have endeavored to employ painstaking janitors so 
that the costs of building upkeep have been meager and that 
the town property be conserved as much as possible, in spite 
of the large enrollment. 

Coincident with the opening of the schools for the present 
scholastic year came the unwelcome word that the Heavenly 
Father had seen fit to call our late superintendent, Orion A. 
Morton, from his earthly abode. Mr. Morton had served this 
union conscientiously and his absence from the classrooms was a 
handicap indeed. For two months the teachers and principals 
carried on their work with a loyal civic spirit. 

With the beginning of November, William E. Hebard 
entered upon the duties of superintendent of schools for the 
union and town. Mr. Hebard had served in similar capacity 

49 



in the Chester and Charlemont districts in this state since 
1920. 

Another interruption in regular teaching was caused by the 
illness of Clarence Larkin, who has been absent from his duties 
since October. We have been fortunate in having available 
capable substitutes, Miss Billings, and now Mr. Larkin's 
brother, Edward, for the important grades. We would be for- 
getful if we did not express our appreciation to Mr. Larkin 
for his extra work while we were without a superintendent. 

Following this report will appear the forecast of expenses 
for 1932 and we have attempted to have the best interests of 
our town and your town at heart. We have returned about 
$3000 of the 1931 appropriation into the town treasury. We 
assure you that if our anticipated forecast is appropriated we 
shall be as careful in its expenditure as we were this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH CHANDLER, 

J. HENRY CHARLEB01S, 

FRANCIS W. LOVETT. 



50 



Financial Statement 

1932 



The following set of figures constitutes a careful forecast 
of the several portions of the Hatfield School Account, based on 
prevailing salary scales. 

For comparison purposes there is shown at the right of 
each sub-total the amount which would result if we used for 
Hatfield the average pupil costs for the specified items as taken 
from the last annual report of the State Department of Edu- 
cation. 

General Administration: Hatfield State 

School Committee £200.00 

Supt. of Schools 1,650.00 

Attendance Officer 400.00 

Stationery, postage 125.00 

Telephone 150.00 

Travelling 240.00 

Census 25.00 

— — $2,800.00 $2,611.00 

Instruction: 

Elementary $22,100.00 

Academy 7,900.00 

Vocational 4,500.00 

Health . 1,000.00 

Supervisors 1,800.00 

Substitutes 400.00 

$37,700.00 $49,775.00 

Textbooks and Supplies: 

Academy $1,200.00 

Vocational 200.00 

Elementary 1,600.00 

$3,000.00 $3,189.00 

51 



Transportation: 

Academy $1,100.00 

Elementary 200.00 

$1,300.00 $1,849.00 

Janitors, Fuel, Lights: 

Academy $1,600.00 

Elementary 5,400.00 

$7,000.00 $7,050.00 

Repairs: 

Academy $100.00 

Elementary. 200.00 

$300.00 $3,454.00 

Household Arts $300.00 

Miscellaneous including grad- 
uation expenses ■ $100.00 $591.00 

Total for Hatfield $52,500.00 



IF — we had used the average cost for the entire 
Commonwealth for the present enrollment in Hat- 
field $68,519; 



52 



Report of Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee, Citizens and Parents of Hatfield: 

Herewith 1 present my first annual report as superintendent 
of your schools and as the time in which I have served you is 
less than a term so this report may be somewhat shorter than 
has been customary. 

1 am satisfied that in the elementary schools all of the 
rooms have made progress. Perhaps some grades have made 
greater strides than other grades or other divisions of the same 
grade. This fact should not necessarily be cause for alarm for 
not all pupils of the same age have the same native ability in 
the various studies of even the lower elementary years of 
school. 

The ideal situation would be to have sufficient trained 
teachers so that each child could be taught individually through- 
out his progress along the routine subjects. Obviously this would 
entail more expense than any ordinary township can devote to 
education. So our traditional plan of grade grouping is at best 
plainly to a degree a makeshift arrangement and it is to the 
credit of teachers everywhere that these groups of widely vary- 
ing abilities make the advance year by year with so few real 
failures. 

Right here in Hatfield I believe that we should expect 
more thorough grounding in the customary elementary studies 
before the certificate of completion of the eighth grade is granted 
permitting entrance into Smith Academy. It might result in an 
extra elementary teacher even to the number now employed 
but it is equally certain elementary instruction is more econ- 
omical than secondary instruction. 1 am equally confident 
that the scholarship within the classes of Smith Academy 
could be held to a more definite standing than I think may 
prevail at the present time. 

53 



Inasmuch as the present pupils are there enrolled I have not 
made a very thorough testing of the high school grades as yet. 
I do think it wise to be reasonably certain that pupils who enter 
the Academy for the next few years will be sufficiently ready 
to grasp the work. 1 assume that the Academy faculty will 
agree with me. 

From random observations 1 should think that your 
Academy faculty is doing creditable teaching. I imagine it is 
from a too heavy teaching load that in some instances a teacher 
has two grades of subject matter to teach in one period. I 
refer to the French classes. For college and normal preparation 
some different plan ought to be arranged before next Septem- 
ber. I think we can. 

I am pleased with the care and maintenance given your 
buildings. They are in good shape. Some of the elementary 
buildings are not modern but they are well cared for. 

As my late predecessor has mentioned I, too, will commend 
the opportunities given the townschildren in the vocational 
courses. Those pupils who have not given serious thought toward 
advanced studies in college, normal or professional courses 
should be encouraged to largely limit their secondary studies 
to the vocational courses that they may be the more inter- 
ested citizens as they grow into the local civic life following 
school activities. 

It is a common saying that comparisons are odious. There 
are occasions when comparisons are enlightening and may 
serve as stabilizing factors. It may be that the present economic 
situation is sufficiently vital to give a few figures from the 
most recent report of the State Department of Education. 
These figures are based on the school year which ended June 
30, 1931. 

The net average cost per pupil for Hatfield in 

all the grades, I through XII was 372.10 

On the similar basis for the Commonwealth . was 100.82 

54 



The net average cost per elementary pupil in 

Hatfield was $59.63 

On the similar basis for the Commonwealth . was 80.69 

The net average cost per high school pupil in 

Hatfield was 128.40 

Similarly for the Commonwealth was 126.41 

In this connection it is fair to state that your average high 
school attendance last year was 94, and this year it has been in 
excess of 130 without an attendant increase in costs. Also 
some of this per pupil cost was attributable to the installation 
of the commercial equipment. 

Now should the voters in town meeting assembled decide 
to reduce school costs and vote it was the sense of that meeting 
that the committee reduce existing salaries 1 do not presume to 
question the intentions of any citizen or group of citizens. I 
shall assume it my duty to mention approximate results from 
given conditions. 

1) Should the voters instruct the School Committee to 
reduce all salaries $50.00 per year which would produce a total 
salary reduction of $1350.00. There would also be a reduction 
in State and Vocational Funds of $850 so the net saving would 
be only $500.00. Base this reduction on its effect on your tax 
rate and use the state valuation on which much of the school 
returns is based and a difference of 15 cents per thousand 
dollars of valuation would ensue. 

2) Suppose a reduction of $100 per teacher be the issue 
a saving of $2700.00 would occur. However there would also 
be a reduction of $2265 in State and Vocational Funds which 
would bring a net saving of only $435.00 and an effect of only 
13 cents per thousand of valuation. 

Frankly, I have just ONE object in making these deduc- 
tions, namely, to inform the interested voters as to probable 
results. These are times of stress and all have the right to do 
sa may seem best. I do not want to be held responsible if in 

55 



measures of economy the results are not compatible with the 
expectations. 



In the few weeks which I have served your community 
1 have appreciated the many kindnesses of the officials and the 
loyalty of the teaching force and the response from the pupils 
for whom after all this report wholly concerns. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HEBARD, 

Superintendent of Schools. 
19 Bates Street, 
Northampton, Mass. 



56 



Principal of Smith Academy 



To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee 
of Hatfield: 

1 hereby submit my second annual report as Principal of 
Smith Academy. The opening registration was 137 — divided 
as follows: Seniors, 20; Juniors, 23; Sophomores, 30; Fresh- 
men, 64. ' • 

Since that time 6 pupils have left school and 1 has entered. 
The present enrollment of 131, 67 girls — 64 boys, is the highest 
in the history of the school. The opening registration in Septem- 
ber 1930 was 94. The percentage of attendance to date of 
94.5% is practically the same figure as of last year and approx- 
imates closely the average attendance figure for High Schools 
of the State. Truancy is not a problem in our School. How- 
ever a continued effort is made to reduce all absences to a 
minimum. 

The School Curriculum lists the following courses: Classi- 
cal, Scientific, General, Commercial, Household Arts and 
Agricultural. This program of course seems broad enough to 
furnish equality of educational opportunity for all the pupils, 
which does not mean exactly the same kind of schooling for 
every pupil but means rather the pursuance of the course that 
holds promise for the pupils best development. 

Athletics continue to play an important part in our health 
program. With the excellent facilities of the Memorial Town 
Hall available, a broader athletic program, for boys and girls, 
non members of any athletic team, deserves serious considera- 
tion, lnterclass basketball games for boys and girls will soon 
be inaugurated. 

57 



N : twithstanding an expenditure of 3100 last year for 
equipping the basketball court and the lowering of the student 
athletic tax from S2 to SI. the financial status of the Athletic 
Association is in a satisfactory condition. This condition is 
made possible by two appropriations: one from the school 
budget to help defray expenses for equipment, referees and 
transportation, the second from the Board of Trustees of 
Smith Academy sufficient in amount to pay the rent of hall for 
basketball games. Basketball, for several years, has proved to 
be the only sport showing a profit and this profit was used in 
paying soccer and baseball expenses. The Student Athletic 
Asszciation greatly appreciates these financial aids to their 
treasury. 

I wish to thank the Faculty- and Supervisors of Smith 
Academy for their helpful attitude and hearty cooperation in 
all activities connected with the school. 

I am grateful to Messrs. Tames Donlin and Frank Brehm 
for their splendid assistance in carrying on the assemblies. 
dances, card parties and other extra curricular activities of 
the school program. 

We must all regret exceedingly the passing of Superin- 
tendent 0. A. .Morton who died on September 12. 1951. For 
41 years he was employed in some department of public service. 
He was called by the people from one position to another, his 
influence becoming constantly greater, his ability keeping step 
with his opportunity. His death ends a career of considerable 
interest to the friends of general and vocational education. 
"Thus passes a genial pioneer, a man with vision beyond his 

Z. ':. ' ' 

Finally. 1 wish to express my appreciation of the loyal 
support and cooperation of the Superintendent, members of 
the School Committee and Board of Trustees of Smith Acad- 
emy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD T. BURKE. 

Principal. 

58 



Report of Music Supervisor 



The method of teaching music in our public schools is 
based on the fact that the real value of music education lies in 
developing the feeling of response to the singing or hearing of 
beautiful music. 

The earliest years are devoted to forming the singing habit 
by imitation. The second stage is the "bridging-over period" 
during which the children learn notation while their song 
singing is still taught by imitation. Therefore through these 
grades the various phases of work undergo a natural and 
gradual development. The third stage is a period of adjust- 
ment, technical facts and their relationship to note represen- 
tations are developed into sight-singing. 

We hope by this procedure to develope a greater mental 
and musical maturity and to instil into the pupil a feeling of 
independence and ease in any musical activity. 

In June, practically all of the children of the grades under 
the direction of their teachers presented a varied program in 
the Town Hall. The enthusiasm, interest and hard work which 
the teachers and children put into this big undertaking was an 
inspiration never to be forgotten. Each individual did his or 
her utmost to make this affair the success that it was. We wish 
to thank the parents for their splendid co-operation also Mr. 
D. P. Sheehan and Mr. Stanley Kacinski of Bradstreet for 
transporting the children to the center for rehearsals and per- 
formance. The proceeds were $124, expenses $44. 00, leaving a 
balance of $80.00 which was given to the piano fund for the 
Town Hall Auditorium. 

The other musical activities in the grades and Smith 
Academy consisted of the usual holiday programs, music for 

59 



school plays, prize speaking, Memorial Day and Commence- 
ment week. 

Much of the credit for whatever we have accomplished 
during the school year is due to the school officials and teachers 
for their co-operation and interest and I wish to thank them 
most sincerely. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



60 



Report of the Supervisor of Penmanship 
and Drawing 



The penmanship aims for the year were the same as in 
previous years, namely; to teach children to write a style which 
embodies legibility, rapidity, ease and endurance. By the 
time a pupil reaches the third grade, the fundamentals have 
been mastered. We then, try to make these fundamentals 
automatic. 

It is one problem to teach handwriting well during the 
formal writing period but quite another to make it an auto- 
matic process. Handwriting is a skill that must be developed 
by daily practice and by consistent practice in the right direc- 
tion. There can be no deviation from the right way without a 
set back and loss of valuable time. Writing taught only during 
the formal writing period and then pigeonholed is a waste of 
time. With this in mind, we have stressed these two points. 

1. Formal writing lesson should never be neglected — espec- 
ially in grades 1-7. 

2. The movement, position and form used in the formal 
writing should be required in the regular written work. 

Each year we take a specimen of the pupils best writing 
in September and again in June. We compare the two, to note 
the improvement made and many times the pupils will scarcely 
believe the September specimen their own. 

Mrs. Griffin, visiting instructor from A. N. Palmer Co., 
stopped here last June. 1 showed her many specimens of the 
handwriting done in our schools, particularly English and 
spelling papers. She said the work was of a very high standard 
and asked if she might have the specimens to use in lecture 
work. 

61 



The teaching of writing in any grade is a veritable joy, but 
the response from the primary grades is particularly gratifying 
and inspiring. It is there that the progress made is most evident 
and the pupils show the greatest interest. 

The work for awards was optional on the part of the pupil 
and the results are as follows: 

Business Certificates 34 

Final Certificates 53 

Improvement Certificates. . . 17 

Progress Pins 5 

Palmer Pins 9 

Teacher's Certificate 1 

It is certainly a pleasure to teach art to children. They 
like it so, are so responsive and appreciative of their handwork 
and the handwork of others. It is surprising the growth they 
make in a very short space of time. They learn to be critical 
of their own work and generally know if something is wrong 
and very often what it is. I feel we have made great strides in 
the past year in many respects. 

Our drawing exhibit was given in connection with the 
children's entertainment. We also, exhibited drawing work 
with the handicraft club. 

"Every child with a growing art knowledge from his 
primary school year through his finishing years of schooling, 
will have his eyes and mind and hand attuned and receptive 
to the thousand and one beauties which nature displays every- 
where, often hidden for those only who have had their eyes 
opened. To such, life becomes more full, more satisfying, bring- 
ing a contentment open to poor and rich alike, a pleasure that 
riches cannot buy, an insight that poverty cannot shut out." 

1 wish to express my appreciation and gratitude for the co- 
operation and support afforded me in the work of the past 
year. 

BERN1CE B. ORMOND. 

62 



Supervisor of Health Education 

January 1931 — January 1932 



The school health work of the year followed the regular 
routine of Health Service, Health Teaching and Physical 
Education. 

The aim of the health work is to make the school child 
physically and mentally fit as circumstances will allow, keeping 
in mind the ultimate objective, namely; educating the child 
to be responsible for his or her own well-being; helping all 
children to interpret, understandingly, and relate to them- 
selves, general laws regarding health responsibility to each 
other, including the laws of safety. 

This year has been exceptionally free from infectious 
diseases, excepting a mild outbreak of sore throat in the Brad- 
street section, in particular, early in the year. The attendance 
at school has been good, minor ailments that did arise were 
promptly controlled through the co-operation of the home 
and school. Individual accidents and illness were cared for at 
home by the family physician. 

The two children attending the Health Camp Hodgkins 
enjoyed the month and improved in general health. One boy 
was sent to the Westfield Hospital for children in order to com- 
plete the treatment begun at the camp. 1 take this opportunity 
to express my appreciation to the Hampshire County Public 
Health Association for the service given, not only for the sum- 
mer term, but for the attention shown to the children brought 
to the office. To know one may have, gratuitously, the last 
word on problems relating to malnutrition is a strong line of 
defense against an insidious disease. Locating and treating 
children in the early stage of tuberculosis ensures for the child 
a 90% chance to grow up a healthy individual. 

63 



Defects found among school children vary, largely, accord- 
ing to the interest on the part of the parent as well as on the 
availability of health service. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The regular physical examination was given by the school 
physicians, special attention to the High School group en- 
gaged in athletics, defects noted and program of corrective 
work carried out rather extensively. 

18 pupils had diseased tonsils removed. 

10 pupils had defective vision corrected. 

6 children were examined at the chest clinic, Northampton, 
2 under special observation, one sent to the Westfield Hospital, 
doing well. 

8 showing symptoms of malnutrition have improved 
in weight and energy. Milk is served at each school six months 
of the year to any child that needs it. The children pay for the 
milk at a very reasonable rate. The bringing of fruit to school 
for recess lunch, especially apples, is encouraged and the number 
of apples devoured mount up to the hundreds. 

The sale of candy in school is not approved. Malnutrition 
is not our problem, except in individual cases. The High School 
group show a larger percentage of underweight students than the 
Elementary or Grammar grades. Rapid growth and more 
strenuous activities tend to keep the High School pupil below 
rather than on a level with the scale of weight as laid down for 
the school population. Except when the normal development 
and energy of the student is retarded the weight is not con- 
sidered a defect. 

Dental defects are outstanding. The problem is to have the 
parents realize the importance of identifying the first perman- 
ent molar tooth. This tooth comes early and is considered, un- 
fortunately, a temporary tooth until decay is extended beyond 
the advisability of repair and extraction becomes necessary. 
The extraction of permanent teeth is to be deplored, and by 
no means a minor incident in the dental program. Neglect of 
the teeth is an offense to good health. 

64 



Through the co-operation of the American Red Cross, 
Hampshire County, a dental service was made possible for the 
benefit of all school citizens. 

October 28-December 18, 1931 — the Red Cross clinic 
gave dental service to 235 students as follows: 

Complete correct 151 

Partial correct 84 

Fillings Prophs. Extractions Operations 

485 96 151 732 

In addition to the clinic service 38 children had dental work 
done by private dentists making a total of 815 dental correc- 
tions during the year. 

80% of the corrections were on Grammar, school pupils. 
5% on Elementary school pupils. 15% High School students. 

The detailed rating of the High School students as re- 
garding health requirements as follows: 

A— 40%. B— 20%. C— 40%. The C— rating is failure 
as far as health standards are concerned. Of this 40% defects 
are shown — defective teeth 75%; vision 10%; defective hear- 
ing 3%; malnutrition 3%; diseased tonsils 3%; posture 5%; 
heart lesions 1%. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical education under the supervision of the teachers 
especially in the High School is a prime factor toward Health 
Education in the schools. Athletics and dancing hold an im- 
portant part in the school life of the child. 

SURVEY OF CHILDREN ENTERING SCHOOL 

West Hatfield: 

Number of children 1 
A — 1 Vaccinated. 

North Hatfield: 

Number of children 8. Vaccinated 6. 

A— 3 

B— 2 

C — 3 1 carious teeth. 2 malnutrition. 

65 



School Street: 

Xumber of children 20. 

A— 14 

B— 5 

C — 1 Carious teeth. 

Hill: 

Xumber of children 9. 
A— 5 

B— 2 

C — 2 1 carious teeth. 1 posture (under medical care). 

Bradstreet: 

Xumber of children 8. 

B— 2 

C — 2 1 nasal obstruction. 1 carious teeth. 

HEALTH TEACHIXG 

The daily inspection in the primary grades especially 
followed by health instruction as to its purpose keeps up the 
morale of the school child. Even the simplest health habit is 
based upon scientific truths and is an entirely rational pro- 
cedure. The success of this program depends on the interest 
of the teacher in health education and to the teachers of our 
schools I extend my appreciation of this interest. 

Intermediate and grammar grades have regular instruction 
in the hygiene of healthy living as well as in correlation with 
other studies, here, again the success of the program depends 
on the scientific knowledge the teacher may possess plus the 
interest in health education. 

In the High School the subject of health teaching is carried 
on through the departments of Biology and Home Economics. 
This schedule includes a limited number of pupils. A method 
whereby a larger number of the pupils may receive definite 
health teaching is a problem for consideration. In the Home 
Economic department the Freshmen class not only did well 
in the subject of Hygiene but six of the members received a 
Junior Red Cross First Aid certificate. The Sophomore class 

66 



in Home Hygiene four received the Red Cross Standard Certi- 
ficate, one the Junior certificate. 

The field trips to the milk supply, water supply, sanitary 
control of city sewage and inspection of public utilities con- 
stitute a feature of the study in Hygiene as relating to Munici- 
pal health control. The field trips to the Quonquont milk farm 
where grade A milk is produced, to the local water supply 
reservoir, and later to the laboratory and source of the gigantic 
Cobble Mountain water supply were full of interest. The third 
trip to the filter beds, Easthampton, where city sewage is dis- 
infected before allowed to flow into the river and to the refuse 
terminal to study the economic use as well as the proper dis- 
posal of waste. No class room teaching can put over such 
instruction as is necessary to impress upon the student the 
necessity of responsibility regarding public health. The' im- 
portance of health teaching in the public schools cannot be 
over estimated. The basis of the child's success depends on 
the knowledge of how to keep well and maintain efficiency. 
No detail relating to this objective is so trivial as to be dis- 
regarded. Health is controllable and is dependent largely on 
informed public opinion. The school can assist in shaping 
attitudes with respect to health. Sickness in any form diverts 
energy and discourages ambition. This applies to mental 
health as well as to physical health. 

The school child is entitled to an environment suitable 
to his mental capabilities as well as to his physical necessities. 
Good standards of health requirements and efficient methods 
of health teaching are essential, co-operation on the part of 
school and home in regard to the child's best interest is de- 
manded. Ill health is a social and economic waste. 

To the Superintendent, Members of the School Com- 
mittee, Teachers, Parents and to the Children in the schools, 
this report is 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN HOLMES, R.N. 

Northampton, January, 1932. 

67 



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69 




HENRY F. LONG 

COMMISSIONER 



THEODORE N. WADDELL 
DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTS 



Wc\t (Emnmanfaealtij nf ^assacljusette 

^Eparfmsnt of (Eorpcraiums anfr tHaxaiton 

JiBtfrtshm of Recounts 

February 1, 1932. 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Daniel P. Sheehan, Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen: 

1 submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Hatfield for the fiscal year ending 
December. 31, 1931, made in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 44 of the General Laws. This is in the form of a 
report made to me by Mr. Edward H. Fenton, Chief Account- 
ant of this Division. 

Very truly yours, 

Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts. 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston 

Sir: 

Pursuant to your instructions, I have made an audit of 
the books and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the year 
ending December 31, 1931, and submit the following report 
thereon : 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of 
the several departments receiving or disbursing money for 
the town or committing bills for collection, were examined, 
checked, and verified. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts and pay- 
ments were compared with the treasurer's cash book, the 
appropriation accounts were checked to the town clerk's rec- 
ords of town meetings, the ledger was analyzed, a trial balance 
was taken off, and a balance sheet, which is appended to this 
report, was prepared showing the financial condition of the 
town on December 31, 1931. 

Considerable improvement was noted in the work of the 
accounting department. 

It was noted that the town continues to carry liability 
insurance on town owned trucks. Attention is again called 
to the fact that there is no liability on the part of the town for 
accidents in which town owned motor vehicles are involved, 
with the exception of those used in activities of a commercial 
nature, and, therefore, premiums for liability insurance on 
equipment used in the performance of strictly public functions 
may not be legally paid; however, premiums may be paid for 
effecting insurance providing indemnity to town employees 

72 



by reason of their liability for damages to others for bodily 
injuries caused by operating town motor vehicles, in accordance 
with Section 3, Chapter 458, Acts of 1931. 

Attention was called in the report of the previous audit 
to the fact that the workmen's compensation insurance policy 
of the town included teachers and clerical employees, contrary 
to the provisions of Chapter 807, Acts of 1913, as amended, 
which permit compensation insurance for laborers, workmen, 
and mechanics only. The policy issued in 1931 was examined 
and it was noted that although teachers are eliminated from 
the policy, clerical employees are still included. 

In checking the town clerk's records of town meeting 
proceedings, it was noted that at a special town meeting in 
1931 the town authorized a loan for the purchase of fire equip- 
ment. After the apparatus was purchased and delivered, it 
was learned that the vote to authorize the loan was defective 
and the voters at a subsequent special meeting refused to pass 
a vote correcting the vote of the previous meeting authorizing 
the loan. The equipment, although delivered, has not been 
paid for and an article has been prepared for the annual town 
meeting in 1932 requesting an appropriation. 

The 1930 revenue deficit was not raised in 1931 as sug- 
gested in the report of the previous audit, but assurances re- 
ceived indicate that an appropriation to provide for the deficit 
will be requested in 1932. 

The computation of the tax levy was listed and checked, 
and it was noted that appropriations voted from surplus rev- 
enue are not included in the total appropriations used by the 
assessors in the determination of the rate. Section 15-A, Chap- 
ter 41, General Laws, requires town clerks to report to the 
assessors and town accountant each appropriation in detail 
and the provisions made for meeting the same, if specified in 
the appropriation order or vote, while Section 23, Chapter 59, 
General Laws, as amended by Chapter 428, Acts of 1931, 
requires that the assessors shall annually assess taxes to an 
amount not less than the aggregate of all amounts appropriated 

73 



since the last preceding annual assessment and not provided 
for therein, and that deductions shall not be made on account 
of available funds unless approval in writing shall have been 
obtained from the Commissioner of Corporations and Taxation. 

The town treasurer's accounts were examined and checked. 
The recorded receipts were checked with the records in the 
departments collecting money for the town and with the other 
sources from which money was piad into the town treasury, 
while the payments were checked with the selectmen's warrants 
authorizing them. The cash book was footed, the cash on hand 
was verified by an actual count, and the bank balance was 
proved with a statement received from the bank. 

The securities, including savings bank books representing 
trust funds in the custody of the treasurer, were examined and 
listed. The income was proved and the payments were verified. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked. The taxes outstanding at the time of the 
previous examination were audited, and all subsequent com- 
mitment lists of poll, personal, real estate, motor vehicle excise, 
and old age assistance taxes were proved with the assessors' 
commitment warrants. The recorded cash book collections 
were checked with the collections entered in the commitment 
books, the payments to the treasurer were verified, the abate- 
ments were compared with the assessors' records of abate- 
ments granted, and the outstanding accounts were listed and 
proved with the accountant's ledger. 

A further verification of the outstanding account swas 
obtained by mailing notices to a number of persons whose 
names appeared on the books as owing money to the town, the 
replies received thereto indicating that the accounts, as listed, 
are correct. 

The collector's cash on hand was verified by an actual count 
on January 2, 1932, and a cash variation amounting to $96.20 
was adjusted by him during the process of the audit. 

74 



The financial accounts of the town clerk were examined. 
The receipts for dog and sporting licenses were checked with the 
records of licenses granted, and the payments to the county- 
treasurer and to the Division of Fisheries and Game, respec- 
tively, were verified. The town clerk's cash was verified by an 
actual count on January 2, 1932. 

The surety bonds of the town clerk, treasurer, and col- 
lector for the faithful performance of their duties were ex- 
amined and were found to be in proper form. 

The receipts for licenses issued by the selectmen were 
checked with the records of licenses granted, and the payments 
to the treasurer were verified. 

The records of receipts for town hall rents were checked. 
The rents were paid to the town hall building committee until 
the annual meeting in 1931, after which time they were paid 
to the town treasurer. The cash in the custody of the town hall 
building committee was turned over to the town treasurer 
during the year. 

The accounts of the sealer of weights and measures were 
checked. The receipts were compared with the records of work 
done and the payments to the treasurer were verified. 

The accounts of the health, highway, public welfare, and 
school departments were examined, the records of departmental 
charges being compared with the accountant's ledger. The 
collections were compared with the treasurer's cash receipts and 
the outstanding accounts were listed and proved with the 
accountant's ledger. 

The records of fines and miscellaneous receipts by the 
librarian were checked, and the payments to the treasurer were 
verified. The cash on hand was proved by an actual count on 
January 11, 1932. 

The water department accounts were examined. The 
commitments were proved, the recorded collections were com- 
pared with the treasurer's receipts, the allowances were checked 
and were found to have been properly authorized, and the out- 

75 



standing accounts were listed and proved with the account- 
ant's ledger. The water collector's cash on hand was counted 
on January 2, 1932, a cash variation of $52.26 being noted. 

In addition to the balance sheet, there are appended to 
this report tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's 
cash, summaries of the tax and departmental accounts, as well 
as tables showing the transactions and condition of the trust 
funds. 

On behalf of my assistants and for myself, I wish to express 
appreciation for the co-operation extended by town officials 
during the process of the audit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edw. H. Fenton, 
Chief Accountant. 



76 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance January 1, 1931 312,862.48 

Receipts 1931 179,383.78 

£192,246.26 

Payments 1931 £182,771.95 

Balance December 31, 1931, and 
January 2, 1932: 

Northampton Nat. Bank 29,359.48 
Cash in office, verified. . . . 104.83 
Memorandum — overpay- 
ment voucher No. 504 . . 10.00 

£9,474.31 

£192,246.26 



Northampton National Bank 
Balance January 2, 1932, per statement £10,127.33 

Balance Jan. 2, 1932, per check book £9,359.48 
Outstanding checks January 2, 1932, 

per list 767.85 

£10,127.33 



RECONCILIATION OF COLLECTOR'S CASH 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Cash balances January 2, 1932, per tables: 
Taxes: 

Levy of 1929 £377.60 

Levy of 1930 660.75 

Levy of 1931 324.41 

Motor vehicle excise taxes : 

Levy of 1931 100.02 

Old age assistance taxes: 

Levy of 1931 3.00 

Interest on taxes 83.05 

£1,548.83 

77 



Overpayments to treasurer: 
Taxes: 

. Levy of 1929 

Levy of 1930 

Levy of 1931 

Motor vehicle excise taxes: 

Levy of 1931 

Cash on hand Jan. 2, 1932, verified 
Cash variation Jan. 2, 1932 



$.30 
5.00 
1.00 


5.27 

1,441.06 

96.20 



81,548.83 



TAXES— 1925 

M. H. Dwight, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit 

Payments to treasurer Jan. 1, to March 

27, 1931 333.18 

Abatements Jan. 1, to March 27, 1931 4.00 

Recommitment March 27, 1931, to 

James L. McGrath, Special Collector 236.30 



James L. McGrath, Special Collector 

Recommitment March 27, 1931, per 

warrant 

Payments to treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 £234.30 

Abatements March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931 2.00 



8273.48 



$273.48 



$236.30 



$236.30 



78 



TAXES— 1926 
M. H. Dwight, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit. ....". 2833.47 

Payments to treasurer Jan. 1 to March 

27, 1931 £72.00 

Abatements Jan. 1 to March 27, 1931 409.60 

Recommitment March 27, 1931, to 

James L. McGrath, Special Collector 351.87 

£833.47 



James L. McGrath, Special Collector 

Recommitment March 27, 1931, per 

warrant £351.87 

Payments to treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 £349.87 

Abatements March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931 2.00 

£351.87 



TAXES— 1927 
M. H. Dwight, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit £1,049.65 

Payments to treasurer Jan. 1 to March 

27, 1931 £179.44 

Abatements Jan. 1 to March 27, 1931 . 67.30 

Recommitment March 27, 1931, to 

James L. McGrath, Special Collector 802.91 



£1,049.65 



79 



James L. McGrath, Special Collector 

Recommitment March 27, 1931, per 

warrant 2802.91 

Payments to treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 2793.01 

Abatements March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931 9.90 

2802.91 



TAXES— 1929 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit £7,039.20 

Taxes 1930 credited to taxes 1929. . . . 498.65 

Overpayment to treasurer .30 

- — - 27,538.15 

§7,538.15 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1932 2890.23 

Outstanding Jan. 2, 1932, per list. . . . $512.63 

Cash balance Jan. 2, 1932 377.60 

?890.23 



Payments to treasurer 26,647.92 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931 890.23 



TAXES— 1930 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit ! 227,403.47 

Overpayment to treasurer, to be ad- 
justed by collector 5.00 



227,408.47 



80 



Payments to treasurer $20,755.63 

Taxes 1930 credited to taxes 1929. . . . 498.65 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931 6,154.19 

■ £27,408.47 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1932 36,154.19 

Outstanding Jan. 2, 1932, per list $5,493.44 

Cash balance Jan. 2, 1932 660.75 

■ ?6,154.19 

TAXES— 1931 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Commitment per warrants $76,996.43 

Overpayment to treasurer, to be ad- 
justed by collector 1.00 

$76,997.43 

Payments to treasurer $43,186.67 

Abatements 6.64 

Transfer to tax titles 18.68 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931 33,785.44 

$76,997.43 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1932 $33,785.44 

Outstanding Jan. 2, 1932, per list $33,461.03 

Cash balance Jan. 2, 1932 324.41 

$33,785.44 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Commitment per warrant $693.00 

Payments to treasurer $539.00 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932, per list 151.00 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2,11932 3.00 

. $693.00 



81 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1929 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit 371.41 

Payments to treasurer $10.47 

Abatements motor vehicle excise taxes 
1929 credited to motor vehicle ex- 
cise taxes 1931 58.41 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932, per list 2.53 

371.41 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1930 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 
Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit "... . £790.65 

Additional commitment 6.00 

Abatement after payment, refunded. . 10.15 

£806.80 

Payments to treasurer $677.41 

Abatements 18.52 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932 110.87 

— $806.80 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Commitment per warrants $4,702.78 

Abatements after payment, refunded . 62.69 

Audit adjustments: 

Abatements motor vehicle ex- 
cise taxes 1929 credited to 
motor vehicle excise taxes 

1931 $58.41 

Commitments not entered . . 67.93 

$126.34 

82 



Overpayment to treasurer, to be ad- 
justed by collector §5.27 

Abatements after payment, to be re- 
funded .53 

Payments to treasurer #3,925. 32 

Abatements: 

Reported £275.27 

Not reported 16.54 

3291.81 

Error in entering commitments 29.50 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932, per list 550.96 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932 100.02 



£4,897.61 



54,897.61 



INTEREST ON TAXES 

Joseph Yarrows, Collector 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1930 £2.14 

Collections 1931: 

Taxes 1929 £592.20 

Taxes 1930 630.96 

Taxes 1931 48.24 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 

1929 49 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 

1930 10.43 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 

1931 23.46 

£1,305.78 

£1,307.92 

Payments to treasurer £1,307.92 



83 



Collections Jan. 1 to 2, 1932: 

Taxes 1929 £47.77 

Taxes 1930 31.41 

Taxes 1931 3.87 



£83.05 

Cash balance Jan. 2, 1932 £83.05 



M. H. Dwight, Collector 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1931 per previous 

audit £27.05 

Collections Jan. 1 to March 27, 1931: 

Taxes 1925 ' £1.11 

Taxes 1926 30 

Taxes 1927 5.97 

£7.38 

£34.43 

Payments to treasurer Jan. 1 to March 

27, 1931 £34.43 



James L. McGrath, Special Collector 

Collections March 28 to Dec. 31, 1931: 

Taxes 1925 £75.82 

Taxes 1926 61.46 

Taxes 1927 146.71 

£283.99 

Payments to treasurer March 28 to 

Dec. 31, 1931 £283.99 



SELECTMEN'S LICENSES 

Licenses issued 1931: 

Gasoline £15.00 

Pool 6.00 

Alcohol 2.00 

84 



Junk 332.00 

Peddler 16.00 

Common victualler 1.00 

Slaughter 3.00 

Oleomargarine .50 

Milk .50 

Auto dealer 5.00 

Circus 2.00 



Payments to treasurer $78.00 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932, per list 5.00 



TOWN CLERK 

Dog Licenses 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1931, per previ- 
ous audit $1.80 

Licenses issued 1931: 

Males, 135 at $2.00 $270.00 

Spayed females, 18 at $2.00 36.00 

Females, 10 at $5.00 50.00 

$356.00 



Payments to county $322.20 

Fees retained, 163 at 20 cents 32.60 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932, verified 3.00 



TOWN CLERK 

Hunting and Fishing Licenses 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1931, per previ- 
ous audit $7.50 

85 



$83.00 



$83.00 



$357.80 



$357.80 



Licenses issued 1931: 
Series of 1931: 

Resident citizens' sport- 
ing, 169 at 32.75 £464.75 

Non-resident citizens' 

sporting, 2 at £5.35 10.70 

Non-resident citizens' 

sporting, 1 at £14.35 . 14.35 
Minor trapping, 3 at $1.25 3.75 
Duplicates, 4 at £.50. . . 2.00 

Series of 1932: 

Resident citizens' sport- 
ing, 16 at £2. 75 44.00 



£539.55 

£547.05 



Payments to Division of Fisheries and 

Game £459.30 

Fees retained, 175 at 25 cents 43.75 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1931 44.00 



£547.05 



Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1932 £44.00 

Licenses issued Jan. 1 to 2, 1932: 

Resident citizens' sporting, 8 at £2.75 22.00 



£66.00 
Cash on hand Jan. 2, 1932, verified . . £66.00 



TOWN HALL RENTALS 

Receipts 1931 £607.50 

Payments to building committee £131.00 

Payments to treasurer 476.50 

£607.50 



86 



TOWN HALL BUILDING COMMITTEE RECEIPTS 

Balance Jan. 2, 1931 $806.76 

Receipts 1931 598.70 

i $1,405.46 

Payments 1931: 

By building committee . . . $122.17 

By town treasurer 1,050.31 

$1,172.48 

Balance in general treasury Dec. 31, 

1931 232.98 

$1,405.46 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

James J. Fitzgerald, Sealer 

Due from sealer Jan. 1, 1931 $8.57 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931 21.07 

$29.64 

Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931 $21.07 

Due from sealer Dec. 31, 1931 8.57 

$29.64 

Thomas O'Dea, Sealer 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1931 $1.85 

Charges Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1931 83.56 

$85.41 

Payments to treasurer $75.75 

Adjustment charges retained 7.80 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1931 1.86 

$85.41 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1932 $1.86 

Charges Jan. 1 to 11, 1932 2.76 

$4.62 

87 



Adjustment charges retained Jan. 1 

to 11, 1932 

Cash on hand Jan. 11, 1932 


3-40 

4.22 


34.62 






LIBRARY 

Fines 1931 

Payments to treasurer 


£44.05 
16.10 


?60.15 


Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1931 


260.15 






Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1932 

Fines Jan. 1 to 11, 1932 


316.10 

3.06 


319.16 

319.16 


Cash on hand Jan. 11, 1932, verified 





WATER RATES 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1931, per previ- 
ous audit 3-19 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1931, per previous 

audit 21.00 

Charges Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1931 : 

Rates 33,289.23 

Miscellaneous 16.00 

Sale of wood 84.00 

33,389.23 

Charges not reported: 

Rates 33,301.03 

Miscellaneous 19.95 

Sale of wood . . . ' 53.00 

33,373.98 



36,784.40 



Payments to treasurer $6,116.10 

Abatements: 

Reported £82.76 

Not reported * 113.65 

$196.41 



Outstanding Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932, per list 135.41 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1931, and Jan. 

2, 1932 284.22 

Cash variation Jan. 2, 1932 52.26 



$6,784.40 



HATFIELD LIBRARY FUND 

Securities 

Par Value Total 
On hand at beginning of year 1931 .. . $1,400.00 $1,400.00 

On hand at end of year 1931 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 

No transactions in 1931. 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Savings Deposits 
In Custody In Custody 
of State of Town Securities 
Treasurer Treasurer Par Value Total 
On hand at beginning 

of year 1931 $300.00 $5,917.79 $500.00 $6,717.79 

On hand at end of year 

1931 $300.00 $6,019.48 $500.00 $6,819.48 

Receipts Payments 

Income $295.69 Added to savings deposits. . $101.69 

Transfer to town 194.00 

$295.69 $295.69 

89 









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91 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 

For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

1932 




Anker Printing Co. 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 
For Town Meeting, February 20, 1933 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, Constable of the Town of Hatfield in said 
County: Greetings: — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and town affairs 
to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 20th 
day of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles. 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year. Moderator, Town Clerk. One Selectman for 
one year. One Selectman for two years. One Selectman for 
three years. One Assessor for three years. One Member of the 
Board of Water Commissioners for three years. One Member 
of the Library Committee for three years. One Member of the 
School Committee for three years. Town Treasurer. Tree 
Warden. Tax Collector. Elector under the Will of Oliver 
Smith. Six Constables. All of the foregoing to be voted for on 
one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon and 
kept open at least for four hours, and for such longer time as 
the majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no case 
will they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the 
evening. 

Article 2. To hear the reports of the town officers and 
committees. 



Article 3. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
amounts received from the Dog Fund to the Library Fund. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money to pay the over draft on interest account 
Amount £1,220.00. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for the unpaid bills of the school account for 1932. 
Amount £1,398.09 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate money for street lights, or act any thing thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize its 
Selectmen or Superintendent of Highways to employ resident 
real estate taxpayers on the highways, wages for said work to 
be applied against back taxes that might be owed by those so 
employed or take any action thereto. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to direct the School 
Committee to discontinue Household Arts Education in June, 
1933. 

Article 10. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
"Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 

Article 11. To revise and accept the list of jurors sub- 
mitted by the Selectmen. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to credit all 
monev received by the department of public welfare for the 
current vear, back into the department of public welfare 
account. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to accept any 
voluntary contributions by the teachers, in lieu of salary thereof, 
and that these voluntary contributions be credited to the 
School account. 



And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting attested copies thereof in five public places in said 
town seven days before time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 7th day of February in the 
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred thirty-three. 

DANIEL P. SHEEHAN, 
IOHN W. MULL1XS, 
ALEXANDER T. ROGALEWSKL 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Report of the Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield : 

We, the finance committee wish to submit the following 
report. Be it recommended that you raise and appropriate the 
following amounts for the conduct and operation of your town 
business for the ensuing year; 
Ordinary repair and maintenance of highways, 

bridges, sewers, sidewalks and equipment $2,000.00 

Bonds of town officers 205.00 

Inspection of animals, barns and slaughtering 240.00 

Tree work 640.00 

Moth work ,■■:,.' 150.00 

Maintenance of Fire Department 800.00 

Insurance 1,400.00 

Public Welfare 4,000.00 

Interest 1,000.00 

Salaries and expenses of town officers as follows: 3,785.00 

Salaries Expenses 

Moderator $20.00 

Selectmen 240.00 $100.00 

Clerk of Board of Selectmen. . . 80.00 

Town Clerk 400.00 90.00 

Town Accountant 640.00 20.00 

Town Treasurer. 480.00 50.00 

Assessors 680.00 35.00 

Tax Collector, 4-5 's of 1 per cent 

of the levy, estimated at. . . . 640.00 80.00 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 120.00 50.00 

Election & Registration 60.00 



$3,360.00 $425.00 



Employment of School Physicians $160.00 

Maintenance of Schools 42,000.00 

Care of cemeteries & rearrangement of Hill Cemetery 200.00 

Maintenance of Public Library 960.00 

Memorial Day Services 100.00 

Tuition of students at Smith's Agricultural School . 1,500.00 

Police protection and equipment 2,000.00 

Reserve Fund 500.00 

Unclassified accounts 200.00 

Attorney's fees , 300.00 

Care of Town Hall 2,000.00 

Soldiers Aid and Relief , 200.00 

Maintenance of Water Department 1,000.00 

School House Note No. 33 and interest 2,090.00 

Interest on Town Hall notes (not in water revenue) 1,419.50 

TOTAL. £68,849.50 

Be it recommended that the following sums be 
appropriated for the ensuing year. 
Town Hall notes and interest (from available water 

revenue) £5,600.00 



Total ; 274,449.50 

Respectfully submitted, 

DANIEL F. RILEY, 
JOHN W. MULLINS, 
DEWEY J. RYAN, 

Finance Committee. 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Additional Report 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield : 

We, your finance committee wish to submit this additional 
report: In regards to street lights, which will be taken up 
under Article 7 in the Warrant, we would like to state that at 
present we are paying $4,693.00 a year for this service. This 
seems like an enormous amount of money for these times when 
you consider the service which we receive. This sum represents 
about $1.70 of your tax rate, per thousand of valuation. It 
appears that a considerable saving, on our taxes, can be made 
by this elimination. Therefore we suggest that you see fit 
to do without street lights for this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DANIEL F. RILEY, 
JOHN W. MULLINS. 
DEWEY J. RYAN, 

Finance Committee. 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Town of Hatfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen: 

1 submit herewith the report of your Town Accountant for 
the year ending December 31, 1932. 

RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 

Tax Levies — Previous years $21,409.23 

Current year, Poll 858.00 

Current year, Excise '. 2,302.06 

Current year, Personal and Real 30,343.91 

Current year, Old Age Assistance. . . . 414.00 

Previous year, Old Age Assistance . . . 56.00 

355,383.20 



From the Commonwealth: 

Income Taxes $15,738.58 

Corporation Tax Business 965.97 

Corporation Tax, Elec. Lt. Co 412.41 

Corporation Tax, Ry. & Tel. & Tel.. . 162.74 

Corporation, Bank & Trust Co.. ....... 45.28 

Massachusetts School Fund 3,179.30 

Union Superintendent 840.12 

High School 3,208.87 

Gasoline Tax 2,300.00 

Smith Hughes Fund 511.32 

George Reed Fund 84.17 



327,448.76 



License Fees and Permits: 

Gasoline. Alcohol, etc 528.00 

Junk and Fruit ... 52.00 

Pool 4.00 



?64.00 

Court Fines : 

District Court and Jail S659.49 

From Count}* and Town Treasurer: 

Dog Tax from Count}- S255.15 

Town Treasurer. . . ...... 115.40 

£368.55 
Northampton Water Department: 

In lieu of Taxes on Reservoir Land. . . £51.15 

Protested Checks. Paid 37.80 

Telephone Tolls . 7.17 

DEPARTMENTAL 



General Government: 




Town Hall Rent . . 


55*66.60 


r^e^ler's Fee? 


68.96 


Fire Dent. Sale Old Material 


15.00 



High . ; 

Sale of Materials ... >20.45 

Miscellaneous 12.00 

From State,. Chapter SI . . 4,650.00 

Fence Damage 71.43 

Snow Removal 8.00 

Earnings :: R:ad Machinerv 1,391.88 



S450.56 



S6..153.76 



rharities : 

7: Dm Individuals S405.42 

Other Towns and C ities 368.10 

State S4.29 

State, Mother's Aid ... 173.34 

Sale :: Wood 75.75 



10 



SI. 104.90 



Schools: 

City of Boston, Tuition $50.88 

Miscellaneous 18.21 

Sale of Lunches 37.09 

3106.18 

Unclassified: 

Unclaimed checks $4.00 

Water Department. 

Collection of Water Rents, 1931 $441.51 

Collection of Water Rents, 1932 4.884.60 

Hydrant Damage 60.00 

$5,386.11 

Interest: 

From Deposits $251.26 

From Taxes 953.02 

Cemetery, Funds 61.00 

Library Fund 91.87 

$1,357.15 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Temporary Loans $65,000.00 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENTS 

Perpetual Care, ne accounts $900.00 

Interest P. C. Funds 247.46 

$1,147.46 

REFUNDS 

Taxes $29.07 

Schools 9.00 

P. C. Funds 8.00 

$46.07 

Town Hall Committee Earnings $139.60 

Library Fines 72.92 

Total Receipts $164,988.83 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1932 9,474.31 

Total $174,463.14 

11 



PAYMENTS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen: 

Salaries #300.00 

Expenses . 99.59 

£399.59 

Clerk of Board of Selectmen: 

Salary £100.00 

Town Clerk: 

Salary £500.00 

Expense 80.56 



Town Accountant: 

Salary £800.00 

Expense . 10.00 

Tax Collector: 

Salary a-c 1929, 1930, 1931, and 1932 £525.00 

Expense 73.60 

Assessors: 

Salaries •. ,. . £850.00 

Expense 26.28 



£580.56 



£810.00 



£598.60 



£876.28 



Town Treasurer: 

Salary £600.00 

Expense 50.12 

£650.12 

Attorney's Fees £389.66 

Election and Registration: 

Salaries of Registrars £55.70 

Salaries of Election Officers . 76.00 

Expense 16.50 



£148.20 



12 



Town Hall Maintenance: 

Janitor £828.00 

Fuel 606.20 

Light and Power 306.18 

Janitor Supplies 104.24 

Repairs and Improvements 144.54 

31,989.16 

Bonds of Town Officers 3217.50 

Total for General Government £6,759.67 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police: 

Salary of Chief 32,000.00 

Extra Officers 66.75 

Telephone 27.50 

Garage Rent 50.00 

Equipment and Repairs 322.64 

Gas and Oil 128.29 

— 32,595.18 

Fire Department: 

Salaries and Wages 3624.54 

Telephone 28.76 

Fuel and Light 78.51 

Repairs 61.62 

Equipment 69.61 

Hose 156.00 

Storage Hose Wagons 55.00 

Gas and Oil . . . 33.87 

31,107.91 

Sealer: 

Salary 3150.00 

Expense 50.00 

— 3200.00 

Forestry: 

Moth Work, Salary and Wages 3144.35 

13 



Tree Work: 

Salary and Wages $671.95 

Supplies and Tools 51.01 

3722.96 

New Fire Truck: 

American La France Co 36,000.00 

Total for Protection £10,770.40 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 

Inspection of School Children #200.00 

Inspection of Animals, Barns and Meats 259.40 

Inspection Expense 40.60 

3500.00 

HIGHWAYS 

General, Bridges, Sidewalks and Sewers: 

Salaries and Wages 3836.29 

Teams 12.00 

Stone and Gravel 47.62 

Equipment and Repairs 340.80 

Gas and Oil 686.00 

Lumber for Bridges 273.35 

Repair, Riverside Bridge, Auto Dam- 
age 84.46 

Paint 6.85 

Snow Removal 306.09 

Signs 7.74 

Mowing, Bridge St. Common 25.00 

Supplies 59.07 

Registration 4.00 



32,689.27 



Chapter 81: 

Salaries and W T ages 33,401.10 

Trucks 3,364.39 

Stone 281.04 

Gravel 647.20 



14 



Tar 32,303.17 

Cement... 8.40 

Signs. 57.00 

Tools and Supplies • • • • 52.41 

Repairs on Tools 7.00 

Culverts ,. . . . 197.44 

Freight ..... 33.00 

310,352.15 

Total for Highways 313,041.42 

Road Machinery: 

Chevrolet Truck 3700.00 

Street Lights 34,689.68 

CHARITIES 

Cash 3619.81 

Printing and Supplies .3.07 

Traveling Expenses and Transportation 302.18 

Groceries and Provisions 670.09 

Fuel 170.65 

Board and Care 66.00 

Medical Aid and Hospital 434.05 

Sanatoriums 979.44 

Relief by other Cities and Towns 1,484.84 

Mother's Aid 200.00 

Miscellaneous 56.30 

34,986.43 

SOLDIER'S RELIEF 

State 315.97 

Town of Hadley 47.95 

363.92 



Total for Charities 35,050.35 

SCHOOLS 
General Administration: 

Salary of Superintendent 31,650.00 

Salary of Nurse . 949.98 

15 



Salary of Enforcement Officer 3362.00 

Printing, Postage, Stationery 9.41 

Telephone 140.51 

Traveling Expense 131.30 

Census, 1932 25.00 

Teacher's Salaries: 

High 312,516.73 

Elementary 25,133.21 

Substitutes 60.00 

Manual Training 462.50 

Text Books and Supplies: 

High, Books 3327.23 

High, Supplies 215.52 

Elementary, Books 401.39 

Elementary, Supplies 682.01 

Commercial, Books and Supplies 33.99 

Household Arts: 

Supplies 3128.11 

Lunches, Materials For Sale 27.47 

Books and Supplies 21.42 

Equipment. 27.75 

j Traveling Expense 41.96 

Agricultural and Vocational: 

Supplies 3276.46 

Equipment and Tools 54.46 

Books 8.47 

Transportation 36.00 



33,268.20 



338,172.44 



31,660.14 



3246.71 



3375.39 



Tuition: 

City of Northampton. . . . ; 39.60 

16 



31,046.00 



?3,212.27 



?3,992.45 



Transportation: 

High 3846.00 

Elementary 200.00 

Janitors: 

High 3600.00 

Elementary 2,612.27 

Fuel, Light and Power: 

High 3726.16 

Elementary 3,266.29 

Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 

Janitor's Supplies, High $32.27 

Janitor's Supplies, Elementary 166.06 

Miscellaneous Supplies, Elm 46.97 

Repairs, Elementary 448.85 

Graduation Expenses: 

Diplomas, Programs, etc 327.80 

Speaker 20.00 

Athletics: 

High 3276.68 

Elm 10.50 

3287.18 

Total for Schools 353,012.33 

Hatfield Students at Smith's Agricultural School: 

Tuition 31,417.50 

Ten students attending Jan. 1, 1933. 
Tuition, 33.75 per student per week. 



3694.15 



347.80 



Salaries: 

Librarian 


3404.64 


Assistant and Branch Librarians. . . . 


139.85 



17 



Books £400.92 

Binding Books .29.36 

Supplies 25.38 

Tanitor 90.00 

Fuel 86.00 

Light 18.00 

Janitor Supplies 5.85 



INSURANCE 

Schools.. £94.00 

Workmen's Compensation 389.59 

Trucks and Police Car 200.85 



MEMORIAL DAY 

F. Machalik, Band. ....'.'.' £80.00 

F. G. Howard, Flags 22.50 

Transportation . • 29.92 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Printing Town Reports, Madsen £154.70 

Delivery of Town Reports 10.56 

Care of Town Clock 25.00 

Repair of Town Clock 55.00 

Elector, Salary. 10.00 

Protested Checks 74.83 



PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 
Water Department: 

Commissioner's Salaries £150.00 

Salary of Superintendent and Labor. . 364.94 

Postage 5.00 

Labor 1,684.40 

Pipe and Fittings 355.42 



18 



£1,200.00 



£684.44 



£132.42 



£330.09 



Pine Seedlings $83.50 

Equipment 51.71 

Purchase of Land, For Protection of 

Water Supply 50.00 

Collector's Bond ' 5.00 

— $2,749.97 

CEMETERIES 
Labor, Main Street, W. Hatfield, North 
Hatfield, Bradstreet and Hill Cem- 
eteries £95.38 

New Fence, Main Street Cemetery. . . 204.62 

$300.00 

INTEREST 

Town Hall Loan $2,231.25 

School House Loan 180.00 

Temporary Loans 1,981.25 

$4,392.50 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Town Hall Notes, Nos. 58 to 63, inch . . $5,000.00 

School House Note No. 32 2,000.00 

Temporary Loan Note No. 116 25,000.00 

Temporary Loan Note No. 1 17 15,000.00 

$47,000.00 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Taxes, State $3,997.50 

Taxes, County. 8,915.94 

Taxes, Audit 374.89 

Taxes, Parks and Reservations 5.65 

Taxes, Old Age Assistance 691.00 

Perpetual Care, Cemetery Funds 316.46 

Perpetual Care, New Accounts 900.00 

Library Yund Income. 91.87 

$15,293.31 

19 



REFUNDS 

Excise Taxes $50.05 

Real Estate Taxes . 15.90 

265.95 

TOWN HALL COMMITTEE FUND 

L. Bamberger, Rugs £197.00 

Music House, Payment of Piano 100.00 

$297.00 

WAR MEMORIAL TABLET 

Thos. F. iMcGann & Sons $308.65 

Dog Taxes Paid to Town Treasurer by Town Clerk 106.80 

Total Payments $168,802.48 

Cash Balance on Hand . 5,660.66 

$174,463.14 



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26 



Treasurer's Report 



F. W. Lovett, Treasurer, in account with 
TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance, Tan. 1st, 1932 £9,464.31 

Receipts, Jan. 1st to Feb. 23rd, 1932. . . 8,008.81 

517,473.12 

Payments, Jan. 1st to Feb. 23rd, 1932. . $12,625.2.7 
Balance Northampton National Bank, 
February 23rd, 1932, transferred to 

J. R. McGrath, Treasurer. 4,847.85 

$17,473.12 



Northampton National Bank & Trust Co. 

Balance, February 23, 1932, per statement $6,537.49 

Balance Feb. 23, 1932, per check book. . $4,847.85 
Outstanding checks Feb. 23, 1932, per list 1,689.64 

$6,537.49 



FRANCIS W. LOVETT, 

Treasurer. 



27 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 



Income Expense Balance 
Fund 

Hannah W. Smith 

Augusta Wells 

Oliver Warner 

John H. Sanderson 

Luman M. Moore 

P. M. Wells 

Benjamin Waite 

Abby Dickinson 

Silas G. Hubbard 

Lev: Graves 

Lucy L. Morton 

Charles Smith 

Lemeul B. Field 

Rufds H. Cowles 

Charles E. Hubbard 

Alpheus Cowles 

James Porter 

Daniel W. Allis 

J. H. Howard 

Fannie M. Burke 

CharleE 5. Shattuck 

Seth W. Kingsley 

E. S. Warner 

Reuben Pelden 

Theodore Porter 

Charles L. Graves 

Roswell Hubbard 

Cooley D. Dickinson 

Elijah Bardwell 



1932 


1932 


1952 


£16.71 


£4.00 


S124.24 


16. 


13.50 


400.69 


2.14 


2.00 


53.95 


4.48 


4.00 


111.87 


9.66 


8.00 


241.54 


5.14 


5.00 


127.-: 


3.56 


2.00 


90.21 


4.16 


3.50 


104.0 : 


11.44 


4.00 


290.90 


6.92 


4.00 


174 \ : 


13.68 


4.00 


548.75 


4 


4.00 


116.96 


4.64 


4 


116.17 


4 n 


4.00 


118.24 


4.98 


4.00 


124.57 


4. : 4 


4.00 


115.44 


4.40 


4 


109.M 


6.72 


38.% 


151.72 




4.00 


109.10 


4.44 


4.00 


ll-> 82 


4.44 


4.00 


11" : 


4.40 


4.00 


109.45 


:: 




209 77 


_ "_ 




122.00 


4.26 


4.00 


10 


4.26 


4.00 


106.22 


4.24 


4 : 


105.-2 


5.30 


5.00 


132.07 


16.00 


4.00 


408.39 



$4.00 


$104.96 


22.50 


622.47 


4.00 


107.29 


4.00 


59.01 


4.00 


103.60 


3.50 


104.64 


4.00 


104.04 


4.00 


223.93 


3.50 


103.28 


8.00 


280.27 


4.00 


100.97 


4.00 


101.26 



Joseph D. Billings..... $4.20 

Edward C. Billings 29.61 

Augusta Beals 4.30 

Anthony Douglas 2.87 

J. E. Porter 4.16 

Jonathan Craves 4.18 

Hugh McLeod 4.16 

B. M. Warner 8.84 

Chester Hastings. . 4.12 

Lucius & Stearns Curtis. . . . 11.18 

Frary & Gardner 4.04 

Henry C. Batchellor 4.08 

NEW ACCOUNTS 

T. F. Knight & Jno Porter. . $9.35 $8.00 $401.35 

H. W. Carl 100.00 

Scott & Herman Harris 200.00 

Thaddeus & Solomon Graves 2.67 202.67 

Perpetual Care Funds Received 239.46 

Paid Out Care of Lots 239.46 

Hatfield Library Fund, Inter- 
est on Mortgage 92.95 

J. R. McGRATH, 
Treasurer. 



29 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Tohn R. McGrath, Treasurer, in account with 
TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance, February 24. 1932 per pre- 
vious audit 24,847.85 

Receipts February 24 to December 

31, 1952 156,990.02 

3161,837.87 

Payments February 24 to December 

51. 1952 3156,177.21 

Balance December 31, 1932, in office 
Balance December 31. 1932 

in office verified JO. 40 

Xorthampton Nat. Bank & 

Trust Co 25,660.26 

35,660.66 

3161,837.87 

Xorthampton National Bank < c Trust Co. 
Balance December 31. 1932 per state- 
ment 36,792.16 

Balance December 31. 1932 per check 

book 35,660.26 

Outstanding checks December 31, 

1932 per list 1,131.90 

36,792.16 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 
Audited and found correct. 

GEORGE W. SEARLE, 

State Examiner. 



30 



Assessors Report 



Value of assessed buildings #1,547,560.00 

Value of assessed land 975,565.00 

Value of assessed real estate 2,523,125.00 

Value of assessed personal estate 238,992.00 

Value of assessed real and personal estate 2,762,117.00 

Rate of tax per §1000 $26.50 

Number of polls assessed 691 

Number assessed old age assistance tax 691 

Number of persons assessed on property 567 

Number of horses assessed 308 

Number of cows assessed 292 

Number of neat cattle assessed 67 

Number of sheep assessed 400 

Number of fowl assessed 398 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 467 

Number of automobiles assessed 618 

Acres of land assessed 8,943 

State tax §3,997.50 

State audit tax §374.89 

State parks and reservation tax §5.65 

County tax §8,915.94 

Overlayings §1,672.82 

Town tax §107,415.38 

Old age assistance Tax §691.00 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income tax §14,968.18 

Excise tax 3,400.00 

Corporation tax 2,039.71 

Bank tax 22.05 



31 



Licenses $100.00 

Fines 300.00 

Schools 7,000.00 

Highways, Chap. 122, Acts of 1931 . 2,300.00 

Old age assistance tax 691.00 

All others 2,723.00 

Available funds 16,332.18 

VALUE OF PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Under Ghap. 59, General Laws 

Church Property $68,000.00 

Town Property 339,605.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery 3,500.00 

Smith Academy 66,000.00 

ADDITIONAL ASSESSMENTS 

1 Poll at $2.00 $2.00 

1 Old Age Assistance Tax at $1.00 1.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
JOHN E. RAFFA, 
ADOLPH M. TOCZKO. 



32 



Town Clerk's Report 

VITAL STATISTICS 1932 

BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 

Male Female 

January 2 

February 1 

March 4 3 

April 2 3 

May 1 

June 

July 3 

August 2 

September 

October 1 1 

November 1 1 

December 2 4 

Total 13 18 

BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 

Fathers Mothers 

United States 22 24 

Poland 7 6 

Czecho-Slovakia 1 

Nova Scotia 1 

Total 30 31 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 

47 54 35 40 28 



33 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS— 1952 



January. . 
February . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

Tune 

July 

August 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 



Firs: marriage of both 22 

Second of Groom 3 

Second of Bride 2 

1 oungest Groom 

Oldest Groom 

\ oungest Bride 

Oldest Bride 

Birthplace Groom 

United States 25 

Poland 2 

[^zecko Slovakia. ... 



. 20 
. 63 
. 13 
. 51 
Bride 
25 

1 

1 



Total 



27 



27 



27 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



1952 



Kovalski, Edward A. 
Carey. David 
Morton. Albert W. 
Domardzki. Michael 
Wickels, Sadie Smith 
Billings. Samue: F. 
Billings. Gordon 
Fortsch. John 
Powers. Man' A. 
Fralick Barnabus 
Schwarting. William 
Oldest person ("male 81 years. 



Boyle. Mary A. 
Zapka. Paul 
Lynch, William E. 
Archer. Annie 
Gadnski. Walter 
Celatka. Julia X. 
Kukucka. Karl R. 

Burda. 

Raffa, Michael J. 
Ziezulewicz.. Chester 



34 



DOGS LICENSED 
1932 

131 Males @ 32.00 each $262.00 

10 Females @ £5.00 each 50.00 

Balance from 1931.... 3.00 

?315.00 
Less 141 fees @ 20 cents each 28.20 

3286.80 
Paid County and Town Treasurer 286.80 



V. H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 



35 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library and the 
Citizens of Hatfield: 

The year 1932 has shown a steady growth in the library. 

With more leisure and less money at their disposal, people 
have naturally done more reading, thus increasing our regis- 
tration from 461 to 627, and the circulation from 15,270 to 
20,412. a gain of 33%. 

Through the Division of Public Libraries of Boston we 
are able to have Polish books always available. During the 
year we have also had two loans of Slovak books and three 
loans of non-fiction, in our own tongue — all from the same 
source. 

The regulation of leaving Thursday evenings for the con- 
venience of working people, (tried out in 1931, with such 
success) was again enforced with the opening of school in 
September. 

We had to choose between having our library a quiet, 
orderly place where one could spend a pleasant hour at the 
reading table, or a rendezvous for the young people. 1 wish 
to thank the parents for their co-operation. 

1 want to take this opportunity to express my apprecia- 
tion for my very efficient assistant Miss Gertrude Boyle. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 

Librarian. 



36 



Tax Collector's Report 



1929 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 3512.63 

Payments to Treasurer $493.87 

By Abatements 18.76 

$512.63 

1930 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 $4,832.69 

Cash on hand December 31, 1931 660.75 

Payments to treasurer 3,532.08 

Overpayments to Treasurer .34 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 ....... $1,961.02 

1931 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 $33,136.62 

Cash on hand December 31, 1931 324.41 

Payments to Treasurer 15,095.23 

By Abatements 23.85 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 $17,693.31 

1932 POLL AND PROPERTY TAXES 

Commitment per Warrant $76,652.06 

Payments to Treasurer $33,262.31 

By Abatements 86.32 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 $4,303.43 

37 



1929 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Cash on hand 3-28 

Outstanding none 



1930 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 ....... 3110.87 

Payments to Treasurer 313.97 

By Abatements. . 4.37 

Error in P.efunds 11.82 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 89.45 



1931 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 3582.49 

Payments to Treasurer 3199.88 

By Abatements 4.15 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 3378.46 



1932 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 

Commitment per Warrant 34,000.65 

Payments to Treasurer 32,249.67 

By Abatements 136.12 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 31,614.86 



1931 OLD AGE ASSISTAXCE TAX 

Outstanding December 31, 1931. ....... 3154.00 

Payments to Treasurer 338.00 

By Abatements 15.00 

Cash on hand 3.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 398.00 

38 



1932 OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAX 

Commitment per Warrant 3691.00 

Payments to Treasurer $428.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1931 $263.00 

JOSEPH YARROWS, 

Tax Collector. 



39 



Police Report 



Hatfield, Mass., 
December 31, 1932. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 



The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1932, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Drunkenness 12 

Automobile Violations 15 

Breaking and Entering 6 

Assault and Battery 5 

Assault with Dangerous 'Weapon 1 

Lewdness 1 

Larceny 10 

Liquor Violations 1 

Bastardy 4 

Committed to State Farm 2 

Vagrancy 5 

Neglect of Wife . 2 

64 
Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



40 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF HATFIELD FOR 1933 



John B. Bitner 
Fred T. Bardwell 
George Betsold 
James F. Doniin 
John Donnis 
Scott Harris 
Michael Hayes 
Ercent Godin 
Harry E. Graves 
Richard F. Fitzgerald 
Charles Klekot 
Henry Kiigler 
Joseph Liebl 
David Mullaney 
Stanley Rogalewski 
John Stoddard 
Arthur Proulx 
Wm. P. Connelly 
Daniel P. Sheehan 
John F. Sheehan 
John L. Stenglein 
Joseph Slussars 
George A. Deinlein 
James L. McGrath 
Charles Pfiflfer 
Leonard Vollinger 
Michael Yarrows 
John M. Wentzel 
James W. Kiley 



41 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR TFIE 



Year Ending Dec. 31, 1932 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joseph F. Chandler, Chairman Term expires, 1933 

J. Henry Charlesbois, Secretary. ......... .Term expires, 1934 

Arthur C. Bardwell Term expires, 1935 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

William E. Hebard 
72 Ridgewood Terrace, Northampton Telephone 1088 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M. D. C. A. Byrnes, M. D. 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur R. Breor 



SCHOOL CENSUS 

As of October 1, 1932 

Boys Girls Total 

Between 5 and 7 years 53 32 85 

Between 7 and 14 years 220 221 441 

Between 14 and 16 years 83 72 125 

356 325 681 

Note — There were 49 fewer pupils in 1932 than in 1931. 

45 



SCHOOL CALENDAR— 1933 



SMITH ACADEMY 

First Winter Term Opened January 3, 1933 

Closes February 24, 1933 
Second Winter Term Opens March 6, 1933 

Closes April 28, 1933 
Spring Term Opens May 8, 1933 

Closes June 16, 1933 
Fall Term Opens September 5, 1933 

Closes December 22, 1933 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

The present term commenced January 3rd, and the elemen- 
tary schools will continue without vacation until about April 
first when ten days will be allowed for vacation and crop plant- 
ing. The schools will close for the summer June 16th. 

Fall Term Opens September 5, 1933 

Closes December 22, 1933 



HOLIDAY NOTES 

There will be no sessions of schools on holidays nor on 
Good Friday. 

Schools will close Wednesday at noon before Thanksgiving 
for the rest of that week. 

The following days are legal holidays for the Common- 
wealth: 



January 1st 
April 19th 
July 4th 
October 12th 
Thanksgiving 



and 



February 22nd 
May 30th 
Labor Da}' 
November 11th 
Christmas 



46 



Report of School Committee 

To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

Your committee have maintained the same number of 
schools — six — with the same number of teachers — twenty- 
seven — as for the previous year. 

By vote of the joint committee of this school union as a 
measure of economy the position of supervisor of drawing and 
penmanship was discontinued. In making this action the com- 
mittee decided to retain that position in which was the super- 
visor of longer experience. The joint committee also reduced 
the salary of the union school nurse by ten per cent. 

The local committee arranged for reductions in the wages 
of the janitorships about the town. The attendance officer 
also accepted a reduction of twenty per cent. 

The committee would propose for your consideration the 
following estimate of expenditures for the present fiscal year. 

Instruction 333,200.00 

Administration 2,645.00 

Books and Supplies 2,500.00 

Transportation 1,824.00* 

Fuel and Janitors 6,450.00 

Repairs 250.00 

Miscellaneous 100.00 

346,969.00 

* Of this amount 3984 cannot be reduced under present ar- 
ranged agreements. 

The foregoing estimate is 35,531 less than a year ago and 
we assure the voters if ways and means of consolidation can be 
made without educational detriment to our boys and girls we 
shall work to that end in the interest of town betterment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH F. CHANDLER, 
Hatfield, Mass. J. HENRY CHARLEBOIS, 

January 20, 1933. ARTHUR C. BARD WELL. 

47 



Report of Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of Hatfield: 

Herewith is my second annual report as superintendent 
of your schools which will be followed with reports from im- 
portant divisions of school activity. 

Whereas the financial aspect of your schools is evidently of 
primary interest that phase will be considered at the outset. 
It is very true that the expense of education is a large item of 
municipal cost and for that reason more than any other there 
is a general desire for a revision and curtailment of expensive 
educational departments. In some respects there may be a 
similarity between industry and educational activity as to 
methods of reduction. When the demand for any commodity 
ceases the manufacturer can easily close, his shop. Likewise 
when the need for any classroom ceases the small group of 
pupils can be consolidated with some other classroom and the 
extra teacher discharged. However the entire teaching force 
cannot be discharged as long as there are any pupils to be 
instructed. An agricultural crop is planted in April and bar- 
vested in the early autumn and the entire activity has not ex- 
ceeded six months. Xow consider the spread of school planning. 
The pupils at present in Grade I were born six years ago and 
those who complete the eight elementary grades and four years 
in the Academy will be in process of instruction for the next 
twelve years — surely a greater spread of activity than any 
agricultural crop and many manufactured products. This is a 
reason why our present educational system cannot be imme- 
diately revised and halted without more future social disturb- 
ance than present financial distress. 

There is no general rule which can be applied in making 
reductions. There are local conditions which affect schools 
just as there are local peculiarities which govern the growing 

48 



of your agricultural crops even about this one town. The same 
yardstick which was applied to Fall River would not fit Hatfield 
for the conditions in your schools are different. There is a 
greater percentage of your population in school than in most of 
the cities and towns of the state. The following percentages 
are based on figures from the annual state report for the school 
year which ended in June, 1932, for the public schools of the 
state. 

Hadley 32.9% Greenfield 21% 

Deerfield 29 Whately 20 

HATFIELD .... 28 Entire State ....... 18 

Sunderland 25 Conway 18 

Williamsburg. ... 25 Chicopee 16 

Amherst 23 Northampton 14 

There is another field of comparison in the comparative 
cost per pupil from these same places which show again how 
certain factors vary within this very Connecticut Valley. 
The cost per pupil for support and outlay for: 

Conway £135.82 Chicopee . . £85. 11 

Entire State 112.44 Williamsburg 85.61 

Amherst 104.16 Whately 84.72 

Greenfield 99.95 Sunderland 75 .64 

Deerfield 98.40 HATFIELD 71.11 

Northampton 89.67 Hadley 68.68 

Incidentally there were only 14 other cities or towns with 
a lower cost per pupil than Hatfield. The evident and natural 
inference to be drawn from the foregoing comparisons is that, 
notwithstanding the large expense for educational purposes 
within your town, your committee members now and in the 
immediate past have maintained your schools at a very reason- 
able per pupil cost. Give them the credit for careful adminis- 
tration. The thoughtful citizen in good faith cannot accuse 
them of careless spending. 

From the acquaintance of the past fourteen months with 
your schools and pupil enrollment I offer the following possible 
economies for which adjustment can be made after the close of 

49 



schools in June. I do not think any of them would harm the 
educational process of any pupil. The order in which they are 
given does not necessarily indicate the order in which they 
could be placed in operation. 

1 — Close the two rooms at the West Hatfield School in 
June. Transfer the pupils to the Hill and Center Schools. 

2 — Close the Grammar Room at Bradstreet and bring the 
pupils to the Center School where now the rooms for Grades 
VII and V1I1 are not filled to capacity. The same transportation 
as now carries the high school pupils could include the elemen- 
tary pupils. 

3 — If the West Hatfield School is closed combine the trans- 
portation of those pupils with the Elm Street transportation. 
Perhaps the driver could also do part time janitor work. 

4 — Remove the telephones from the schools and superin- 
tendent's office. 

5 — A lower price for fuel might result if bids were not 
restricted to residents of Hatfield. (Hadley is getting coal 
nearly two dollars per ton less than Hatfield.) 

6 — Limit the Academy athletic program to the possibili- 
ties of the game receipts. Physical Education is required by 
law but its extent is not definitely regulated. 

7 — Change the customary school terms and have the long 
vacation in the winter. This will obviously reduce the fuel 
bills. In my experience 1 have had schools in Maine in session 
in July and August which were closed in February and March. 
Even nearer in our Berkshire Hills are towns which begin their 
schools early in August. 

There are four other possibilities which 1 shall mention 
but I do not endorse them. 

1 — For the present discontinue the special helping, teacher 
at the Center School. The present State Law requires a special 
class for backward children if there are ten of them three or 
more years behind grade. I believe that Miss Ryan's work 
does away with that possible requirement. 

2 — Insist that all teachers live in town during the week. 
Perhaps some of the higher priced teachers would resign. 

50 



3 — Raise the entrance age to six years as of entrance in 
September. For one year only there would be a smaller first 
grade and besides the trend in school census indicates a smaller 
first grade in the near future. 

4 — Require all pupils over sixteen years of age beyond 
which school attendance is not required to maintain a passing 
average in their studies or drop out of school. Obviously the 
police department will question the wisdom of this idea. 

1 do NOT reommend the discontinuance of the present 
vocational courses in Smith Academy and my resaons are 
wholly aside from the applied merits of the courses. The men 
and housewives are in a better position to evaluate this side 
of the case than 1 am. If there were no vocational divisions in 
English and mathematics and science then the pupils now in 
them would become members of regular classes. These regular 
classes would be larger and naturally the instruction would be 
spread thinner which is a distinct loss in scholarship. The 
financial return is greater than for the straight academic teach- 
ers. 

The enrollment in the grades of the schools at the close of 
the past term is shown herewith: 

Grades I II III IV V VI VII V III Fr. So. Jr. Sr. 
Pupils 54 53 66 77 55 79 65 77 40 49 25 19-659 

This represents a drop of thirty-four pupils since a year ago. 

1 am satisfied from personal observation and as well from 
standard tests that all of the pupils have made progress in keep- 
ing with the individual ability during the past school year. 

In conclusion I wish to thank all who by word and deed 
have contributed to the progress of education in Hatfield and 
especially members of the committee for their cordial co- 
operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HEBARD, 

Superintendent of Schools 
January 16, 1933. for Hadley and Hatfield. 

51 



Principal of Smith Academy 

To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee 
of Hatfeld: 

I hereby submit my third annual report as Principal of 
Smith Academy. The opei ing registration was 139, divided as 
follows: Seniors, 19; Juniors. 28; Sophomores, 52; Freshmen, 40. 
Since that time 9 have left school and 4 have entered. The 
present enrollment is 134, 71 girls, 63 boys. The opening reg- 
istration in 1931 was 137. 

The percentage of attendance to date of 94.5% is the same 
as last year and approximates closely the average attendance 
figures for High Schools of the state. Under the present curri- 
culum Smith Academy is able to prepare capable and willing 
pupils for any higher institution of learning. This does not, of 
course, mean that everyone registered in the classical or scienti- 
fic course will be eligible for admission to college after graduation 
The individual student can maintain college preparatory stand- 
ards in this school as in any other, only by hard, conscientious 
and continued efforts. For those not preparing for college the 
school continues to offer general and vocational courses, all of 
these interpreting the pupils' present problems by developing 
skills that will be most rfeeded in the future. 

Extra-curricular activities continue to have an important 
place in the school organization. These activities, when prop- 
erly organized and directed, are instruments of education by 
no means inferior to many phases of work included within the 
curriculum proper. Among these activities three may be men- 
tioned, as these events took place in Hatfield during the year. 
The annual banquet of the Hampshire County Basketball 
League was held March 17, with 60 guests present. On May 21 
the Annual Spring Conference of Pro Merito Chapters of 
Western Massachusetts was held with 185 members present, 

52 



representing 13 High Schools. On November 4, the Western 
Massachusetts League of School Publications were guests of 
the Smith Academy "Purple and White" Echo staff. The local 
staff members entertained 160 delegates from 14 schools. The 
girls of the Household Arts department, under the supervision 
of their instructor, Marion D. Glasheen, prepared and served 
the luncheon for these three meetings. 

Athletics continue to have an important place in the school 
program. Last season under the able guidance of Coach John 
R. Kalloch the basketball team won the Tri-County League 
Championship and placed second in the Hampshire League, a 
creditable showing indeed. Soccer and baseball complete the 
athletic program for the boys. The girls show an increased 
interest in basketball and have scheduled games with the 
leading school teams in this vicinity. A continued effort is 
being made to broaden the athletic programs for the boys and 
girls who are not now doing any work along physical education 
lines. The spirit of the student body is commendable. For the 
most part, the pupils are industrious and co-operative. 

I wish to thank members of the faculty for their continued 
and hearty co-operation in all activities of the school. 

The most pressing needs of the school are to my mind as 
follows : 

1 — A school library and study hall should be established 
on the third floor of the Academy. Under present conditions 
pupils are spending their study periods in rooms where recita- 
tions are being held. This is not a satisfactory condition. 

2 — Some sort of a ventilation system should be installed 
as the only fresh air intake now possible is by means of the open 
windows. During the colder months this condition is not a 
satisfactory one either from the physical or financial standpoint. 

Finally, 1 wish to express my appreciation of the loyal sup- 
port and co-operation of the Superintendent, members of the 
School Committee and Board of Trustees of Smith Academy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD J. BURKE, 

Principal. 

53 



Supervisor of Health Education 

195: 



T: the Superintendem and Members of the School Committee, 
Town of Hatfield . Massachusetts : 

his time the entire world is deeply concerned about the 
welfare of the children. : . ::. .e of all commodities react on 
the health of the citizens, adult and child unless careful con- 
sideration is »iven to details by every one connected with civic 
affairs. Sometimes lack of spending money is a good thing 
for children, less candy i ad :. : .:e more good bread and apples, 
less amusement more relaxation and sleep. Growth and devel- 
opment of the child depend on several important factors; the 
immediate hereditary influences of growth organism: the 
nutritional factor, suitable food supply: the health factor, 
ireecom from disease which arrest the growth. Even with 
proper nutrition and _ health individuals grow . different 

rates and attain different statures. 

Good nutrition does not mean weight only. To be well 
nourished one must look well, feel well, act well, resist disease 
and recover from illness quickly, but growth in weight and 
height combined with the other factors is a ^-ood indication of 
good health. 

Apart from a small epidemic cf measles in the Xorth 
and Hill School and few sporadic cases here and there sickness 
was not a drawback to school attendance, in fact, so careful 
were the teachers and children in the Xorth School contagion 
did not spread from the p rims ry tc the grammar room. Several 
jf mumps in the High School latter part of the year were 
evident but no epidemic 



In order to assure the good health of the school children 
a survey in growth was made as follows: 
Grade 8 29 boys gain in height 63 in., av. 1 in to 4 in. 
Grade 8 31 girls gain in height 58 in., av. 1 in to 3 in. 
Grade 7 31 boys gain in height 70 in., av. 2 in to 3 in. 
Grade 7 28 girls gain in height 73 in., av. 1 in. to 3 in. 
Grade 6 44 boys gain in height 74 in., av. in. to 3.5 in. 
Grade 6 28 girls gain in height 69 in., av. 1.5 to 3 in. 
Grade 8 29 boys gained in weight 274 lbs., av. 4 lbs. to 15 lbs. 
Grade 7 31 boys gained in weight 298 lbs., av. 3 lbs. to 12 lbs. 
Grade 6 44 boys gained in weight 318 lbs., av. 5 lbs. to 8 lbs. 
Grade 8 31 girls gained in weight 216 lbs., av. 5 lbs. to 12 lbs. 
Grade 7 28 girls gained in weight 328 lbs., av. 6 lbs. to 15 lbs. 
Grade 6 28 girls gained in weight 318 lbs., av. 6 lbs. to 10 lbs. 

This survey covered a period of 10 mos. to 12 mos. Age of 
children from 12 yrs. to 14 yrs. The average of 8 to 10.5 in 
12 mos. or less surely should prove some comfort as regard the 
welfare of the school child. 

The most important part of the health work of the school 
year was the Chadwick Clinic for detection and prevention 
of tuberculosis. 

I herewith present, in condensed form, the report as sub- 
mitted to the Board of Health and Board of Education. 

Total school population — High School 139 

Total given tuberculin test 106 

Total school population, Grade Schools 519 

Total given tuberculin test 348 

Total given tuberculin test, pre-school 2 

— 456 

Number of reactors to tuberculin test, High 46 

Number of reactors to tuberculin test, Grades 34 

Number of reactors to tuberculin test, Pre-school 

80 

Number of students X-rayed, High 46 

Number of students X-rayed, Grade 34 

80 



55 



Xumber negative X-rays. High 36 

Number negative X-rays, Grade 21 

57 

Number given physical examination. High 10 

Number given phvsical examination, Grade 13 

23 

Number showing Positive or Latent Pul.. T. B 

Number showing Positive or Latent Hilum T. B 

Number showing Latent Hilum T. B 2 

Number classified as suspects for further exam 12 

Number discharged from clinic 9 

23 

Number of malnutrition cases found 456 examined 

The group of 14 will be re-examined next year, '33 and 
kept under supervision as long as any suspicion of trouble 
remains. In the meantime careful directions and advice has 
been given by the examining physician and nutritionist con- 
nected with the clinic. 

This type of tuberculosis is not in any way infectious and 
need not interfere with the regular life of the child, except closer 
attention to good health habits and much rest. 

The physical examination of the school population show 
defects, as usual. Notwithstanding the splendid work of the 
dental clinic last year many dental defects are noted and the 
Red Cross offers the use of the Hampshire County Dental 
Sen4ce to the schools supplementing the health work at the 
expense of 60 cents per operation. 

The second serious defect is faulty vision. Correction of 
this defect is more or less expensive. To offset part of this 
expense frames for glasses have been donated to the school 
welfare department. This contribution is very much appre- 
ciated and cuts down the expense from 30 c 7-50 c 7- More 
frames could be used at once as several children are badly 
in need of vision correction. 

Correction of defects go on steadily. 14 children have 
had vision defects corrected, 20 dental work by private dentists, 
10 diseased tonsils were removed, 30 show improved nutrition. 

56 



The Health Teaching in the High School is one of the 
most important parts of the health work because of the far 
reaching effect. To help and teach some one to help themselves 
and others is constructive activity, to help people to do things 
they can do themselves is wasteful activity in any sphere of 
action, never more so than in health work. The classes :.:rried 
on throughout the school year count up when reckoned in 
hours but reckoned in purpose and effect only thinking people 
can estimate the value. 

11 girls received the Red Cross Junior First Aid Cer:ir:cate. 
5 girls received the Reci Cr:ss Home Hygiene and Care of the 

Sick Certificate although 8 received instruction. 

Present Classes 

9 girls — Home Hygiene and Care of the S i c k . 
11 cirls — Hygiene and Physiology and Firs: Aid. 
19 boys — Tunior Firs: Aid, American Red Cross. 



To the school pi. :d encouragement 

is an inspiration: to the superintendent, school committee; 
to the teachers for help and co-operation and to the entire school 
population, this health report is respectfully submitted. 

MARIAN HOLMES. R. X. 

Tanuarv, 1933. 



57 



Report of Music Supervisor 

HATFIELD 



A brief survey of our public school music, in its gradual 
progress from simple rote song singing to the more intricate 
part songs, reveals its value as an educational and esthetic 
power. 

Music is not for a few but for all, and as singing is the 
natural heritage of every child, we endeavor to give the children 
a technical training to enable them to interpret music intelli- 
gently, with pleasing tone quality and natural rhythm. 

The duty of the supervisor of music is to visit each room 
in the center schools weekly and in the outlying schools, once 
in two weeks for a longer period, and two forty-five minute 
periods weekly at Smith Academy where we have a Girls' 
Glee Club, a Boys' Glee Club and a four part chorus. 

The fine spirit of co-operation from the school officials, 
the superintendent, principals, teachers and pupils has made it 
possible to accomplish what we feel was a successful year in 
music. With this splendid spirit our children need not grow up 
to manhood and womanhood musically maimed, tonally deaf 
or rythmically deficient. The singing child becomes a singing 
adult, the singing adult a music lover. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



58 



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Wc\t (Knmmmtfaealtlj of ^assacljttseite 

Apartment of Corporations ano taxation 

^B&tstwt of Accounts 



EODORE N. WADDELL 
DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTS 



January 2 3, 1933. 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Daniel P. Sheehan, Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen: 

1 submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and 
accounts of the town of Hatfield. The treasurer's accounts 
were audited for the period from February 24, 1932, the date 
of the previous audit of these accounts, to December 31, 1932, 
while the accounts of all other departments were audited for the 
full year ending December 31, 1932, made in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form 
of a report made to me by Mr. Edward H. Fenton, Chief Ac- 
countant of this Division. 



Very truly yours, 



Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts. 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston 

Sir: " 

As directed by you I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield. The treasurer's accounts 
were audited for the period from February 24, 1932, the date 
of the previous audit of these accounts, to December 31, 1932, 
while the accounts of all other departments were audited for the 
full year ending December 31, 1932. 

The books and accounts of the several departments re- 
ceiving or disbursing money for the town were examined, 
checked, and verified. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts were 
compared with the treasurer's record of receipts and with the 
accounts in the departments collecting money for the town, 
while the payments were checked with the treasury warrants 
authorizing them and with the treasurer's books. The ledger 
appropriation accounts were compared with the town clerk's 
record of town meetings, and all other ledger accounts were 
checked with the information in the departments in which the 
transactions originated. The ledger was analyzed, a trial 
balance was taken off, and a balance sheet showing the finan- 
cial condition of the town on December 31, 1932 was prepared 
and is appended to this report. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were ex- 
amined and checked. The receipts, as recorded, were com- 
pared with the records in the departments receiving money 
for the town and with the other sources from which money was 

62 



paid into the town treasury, while the payments were checked 
with the warrants of the selectmen authorizing the disburse- 
ment of town funds. The cash book additions were verified and 
the cash balance was proved by an actual count of the cash 
on hand and by a reconciliation of the bank balance with a 
statement received from the bank. 

The payments of debt and interest were verified by ex- 
amining the cancelled securities on hie and by checking with 
the amounts falling due during the period audited. 

The securities, including savings bank books, representing 
the investment of trust funds in the custody of the treasurer 
were examined and listed. The income and withdrawals were 
checked and verified, and the funds were found to be as re- 
ported. 

The accounts of the tax collector were examined. The 
commitment lists were added and proved with the assessors' 
warrants committing the taxes for collection. The recorded 
collections were checked, the payments to the treasurer were 
verified by a comparison with the treasurer's books, the re- 
corded abatements were checked with the assessors' abatement 
records, and the outstanding accounts were listed and proved 
with the town accountant's ledger. 

The outstanding accounts were further verified by mailing 
notices to a number of persons whose names appeared on the 
books as owing money to the town, the replies' received thereto 
indicating that the accounts, as listed, are correct. 

It is recommended that the collector take the necessary 
steps to secure more prompt collection of taxes in order that the 
town treasurer may not be hindered from complying with the 
provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws, as affecting the issu- 
ance and payment of temporary revenue loans. 

The financial accounts of the town clerk were examined. 
The receipts for dog licenses, issued on behalf of the County, 
and for sporting licenses, the proceeds of which are paid to the 

63 



State, were checked with the records of licenses granted. The 
payments to the county treasurer, the town treasurer, and the 
Division of Fisheries and Game were verified, and the cash on 
hand on January 3, 1933, was proved by an actual count. 

The clerical work of the town accountant, treasurer, tax 
collector, and town clerk has been performed carefully and 
accurately. 

The recorded receipts for licenses issued by the selectmen 
were checked with the records of licenses granted, and the 
payments to the treasurer were verified. 

The receipts for town hall rents were checked and com- 
pared with the record book of the town hall custodian showing 
the rentals of the hall. The payments to the treasurer were 
checked with the receipts of the treasurer and the outstanding 
accounts were listed. 

The accounts of the sealer of weights and measures were 
examined. The receipts w r ere checked with the record of weights 
and measures sealed and adjusted and the payments to the 
treasurer were compared with the treasurer's receipts. 

The accounts of the health, highway, public welfare, and 
school departments were examined. The departmental records 
of charges and collections were examined and listed, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified, and the outstanding 
accounts were proved with the accountant's ledger accounts. 

The water department accounts were examined. The com- 
mitments were proved, the collections were checked, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified, the abatements were 
checked, and the outstanding accounts were listed and proved. 

It is recommended that all departments sending out bills 
for collection promptly notify the accountant in order that he 
may set up accounts on his ledger; similarly the abatements of 
water and other departmental charges should be reported to the 

64 



accountant, in order that his ledger may at all times show the 
true condition of the accounts receivable. 

The recorded receipts from fines by the librarian were 
checked. The payments to the treasurer were verified, and the 
cash on hand on January 12, 1933, was proved by an actual 
count. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance sheet, 
are tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash, 
summaries of the tax and departmental accounts, as well as 
tables showing the transactions and condition of the trust 
funds. 

For the co-operation received from the . several town 
officials during the process of the audit, I wish, on behalf of 
my assistants and for myself to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edw. H. Fenton, 
Chief Accountant. 



65 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 
Balance February 24, 1932, per pre- 
vious audit £4,847.85 

Receipts February 24 to December 31, 

1932 156,990.02 

5161,837.87 
Payments February 24 to December 

31, 1932 ?156,171.21 

Balance December 31, 1932: 

Cash in office, verified .... 5-40 

Northampton Nat. Bank . 5,660.26 

5,660.66 

5161,837.87 



Northampton National Bank 

Balance December 31, 1932, per statement 56,792.16 

Balance December 31, 1932, per check 

book 55,660.26 

Outstanding checks December 31, 

1932, per list 1,131.90 

56,792.16 

TAXES— 1929 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per pre- 
vious audit 5889.93 

Overpayment to treasurer 1.30 

5891.23 

Payments to treasurer 5872.47 

Abatements 18.76 

5891.23 

TAXES— 1930 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per pre- 
vious audit 56,149.19 

Overpayment to treasurer # .34 

56,149.53 

66 



Payments to treasurer $4,188.17 

Outstanding December 31, 1932, and 

January 3, 1933, per list 1,961.36 

£6,149.53 

TAXES— 1931 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per pre- 
vious audit £33, 784.44 

Abatement after payment, refunded. . 5.30 
Overpayments to treasurer to be ad- 
justed by collector .05 

233,789.79 

Payments to treasurer . £16,072.76 

Abatements 23.85 

Outstanding December 31, 1932, per 

list 17,689.16 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932, veri- 
fied 4.02 

£33,789.79 

TAXES— 1932 

Commitment per warrant £74,579.06 

Additional commitment 2.00 

Abatement after payment, refunded. . 10.60 

Overabatement 1.00 

Overpayment to treasurer, to be ad- 
justed by collector 27.40 

£74,620.06 

Payments to treasurer £31,201.91 

Abatements 87.32 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list 43,328.83 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, verified 2.00 

£74,620.06 



67 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous audit. . 3154.00 

Payments to treasurer 356.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list 96.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, verified 2.00 

3154.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1932 

Commitment per warrant 3691.00 

Additional commitment 1.00 

3692.00 

Payments to treasurer 3429.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list 262.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, verified 1.00 

3692.00 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAX— 1929 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous audit. . 32.53 

Payments to treasurer 32.25 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list .28 

32.53 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1930 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous audit. . 3110.87 

Payments to treasurer 321.42 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list 89.45 

3110.87 



68 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous audit. . $645.18 

Abatement after payment: 

Refunded $3.66 

To be refunded 1.02 

$649.86 

Payments to treasurer $266.23 

Abatements 4.15 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list 379.28 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, verified .20 

$649.86 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 

Commitment per warrants $4,000.65 

Abatements after payment, refunded . 46.39 

Overabatement 6.00 

Overpayment to treasurer to be ad- 
justed by collector .02 

$4,053.06 

Payments to treasurer $2,302.06 

Abatements 136.12 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, per list 1,601.51 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and 

January 3, 1933, verified 13.37 

$4,053.06 



INTEREST ON TAXES 
Collections 1932: 

Taxes 1929 $103.62 

Taxes 1930 383.74 

Taxes 1931 : 448.54 

Taxes 1932 12.06 



69 



Motor vehicle excise taxes: 

1930 . . . £ .07 

1931 4.99 

£953.02 
Payments to treasurer 1932 $953.02 



SELECTMEN'S LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous 

audit 25.00 

Licenses issued 1932: 

Slaughter £2.00 

Auto dealer 5.00 

Gasoline 11 .00 

Junk 20.00 

Pool : 4.00 

Innholder 1.00 

Alcohol 2.00 

Fruit 8.00 

Auctioneer 2.00 

Sale 2.00 

57.00 

£62.00 

Payments to treasurer 1932 £62.00 



TOWN CLERK 

Dog Licenses 

Cash on hand January 1, 1932, per pre- 
vious audit £3.00 

Licenses issued: 

Males 114® £2.00.. . £228.00 

Spayed females . . 17® 2.00... 34.00 
Females 10 ® 5.00 .. . 50.00 



312.00 

£315.00 



70 



Payments to county treasurer $173. 40 

Payments to town treasurer 113.40 

$286.80 
Fees retained by 

town clerk 141 (S y 20 cents 28.20 



Sporting Licenses 
Licenses issued: 

Resident citizens' sporting. ... 156 @ $2.75 $429.00 
Non-resident citizen's sport- 
ing 1 @ 14.35 14.35 

Minor trappers' 2 @ 1.25 • 2.50 

Minor sporting 17 @ 1.25 21.25 

Duplicates 5 @ .50 2.50 

Payments to Division of Fisheries and Game $409.10 

Fees retained by town clerk, 176 @ 25 cents 44.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 16.50 



Cash on hand January 1, 1933 $16.50 

Licenses issued January 1 to 3, 1933: 

Resident citizen's 

fishing 1 @$2.00 $2.00 

Resident citizens' 

hunting 2@ 2.00 4.00 

Resident citizens' 

sporting 7 @ 3.25 22.75 

28.75 

Fees retained by town clerk January 1 to 3, 

1933, 10 © 25 cents $2.50 

Cash on hand January 3, 1933, verified 42.75 



71 



$315.00 



$469.60 



$469.60 



$45.25 



$45.25 



TOWN HALL RENTALS 
Charges 1932: 

Auditorium $397.60 

Community Room 30.00 

Basement 20.00 

£447.60 

Payments to treasurer $366.60 

Abatements 45.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and January 

3, 1933, per list 36.00 

3447.60 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Cash on hand January 11, 1932, per 

previous audit $4.22 

Charges Jan. 11 to Dec. 31, 1932: 

Sealing. . $59.30 

Adjusting 4.90 

64.20 

$68.42 

Payments to treasurer $63.46 

Adjusting charges retained 4.90 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and Jan- 
uary 3, 1933 06 

$68.42 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous 

audit $83.57 

Charges .72 

$84.29 
Payments to treasurer $84.29 



72 






HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous 

audit $5.43 

Charges 91.38 

396.81 

Payments to treasurer #91.38 

Outstanding December 31, 1932, per list. . . . 5.43 

#96.81 



PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous 

audit #203.34 

Charges 957.09 

#1,160.43 

Payments to treasurer #944.86 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and January 

3, 1933, per list 215.57 

#1,160.43 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 
Outstanding January 1, 1932, per previous 

audit #386.51 

Charges 766.70 

?1,153.21 

Payments to treasurer #431.96 

Outstanding December 31, 1932, per list. . . . 721.25 

#1,153.21 



LIBRARY 

Cash balance January 12, 1932, per previous 

audit #19.16 

Fines January 12 to December 31, 1932 55.17 

#74.33 

73 



Payments to treasurer January 12 to Decem- 
ber 31, 1932 £73.92 

Cash Balance December 31, 1932 .41 

374.33 



Cash balance January 1, 1933 3-41 

Fines January 1 to 12, 1933 1.22 

$1.63 
Cash balance January 12, 1933, verified $1.63 



WATER RATES 

Cash on hand January 1, 1932, per 

previous audit $284.22 

Outstanding January 1, 1932, per 

previous audit 135.41 

Cash variation January 1, 1932, per 

previous audit 52.26 

$471.89 

Charges 1932, not reported 6,548.82 

$7,020.71 

Payments to treasurer $5,313.61 

Collection credited to estimated receipts in 

error 12.50 

Abatements 1932, not reported 165.55 

Outstanding December 31, 1932 and January 

3, 1933, per list 1,127.87 

Cash on hand December 31, 1932 and January 

3, 1933, verified 397.45 

Cash variation December 31, 1932 and Jan- 
uary 3, 1933 3.73 

$7,020.71 



74 



HATFIELD LIBRARY FUND 

Savings Securities 
Deposits Par Value Total 
On hand at beginning of year 1932 £1,400.00 $1,400.00 

On hand at end of year 1932 $92.95 $1,400.00 $1,492.95 



Receipts 
Income $92.95 



Payments 
Deposited in savings bank • $92.95 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Savings Deposits 
In Custody In Custody 
of State of Town Securities 
Treasurer Treasurer Par Value Total 
On hand beginning of 

year 1932 $300.00 $6,019.48 $500.00 $6,819.48 

On hand at end of year 

1932 $300.00 $6,969.07 $500.00 $7,769.07 

Receipts Payments 
Bequests $900.00 Added to savings de- 
Income 289.05 posits $949.59 

Transfer from town 8.00 Transfer to town . . . 247.46 

$1,197.05 $1,197.05 



75 













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77 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 

For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

J933 




Anker Printing Co. 

Holyoke, Mass. 



Selectmen's Warrant 
For Town Meeting, February 19, 1934 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, Constable of the Town of Hatfield in said 
County: Greetings:— 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Hatfield qualified to vote in elections and town affairs 
to meet in the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 19th 
day. of February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles. 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year. Moderator. Town Clerk. One Selectman for 
three years. One Assessor for three years. One Member of the 
Board of Water Commissioners for three years. One Member 
of the Library Committee for three years. One Member of the 
Schooi Committee for three years. Town Treasurer. Tree 
Warden. Tax Collector. Elector under the Will of Oliver 
Smith. Six Constables. All of the foregoing to be voted for on 
one ballot. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon and 
kept open at least for four hours, and for such longer time as 
the majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no case 



will they be kept open after the hour of eight o'clock in the 
evening. 

Article 2. To hear the reports of the town officers and 
committees. 

Article 3. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer the 
amounts received from the Dog Fund to the Library Fund. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to accept dona- 
tions and contributions, any such received to be credited to 
the various departments for which they are given. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to declare the por- 
tion of Prospect Street beginning on Elm Street at the Roswell 
Hubbard house and extending to the North East corner of the 
Hill Cemetery, a One-Way-Street or act any thing thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue of the current financial year. 

Article 8. To revise and accept the list of Jurors submitted 
by the Selectmen. 

Article 9. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate the sum of twenty-five dollars for the town's share of 
the C. W. A.-W. 154, Women's Project. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting attested copies thereof in five public places in said 
town seven days before time of holding said meeting. 



Hereof fail not and make due returns of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 5th day of February in the 
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred thirty-four. 

JOHN W. MULL1NS, 
ALEXANDER T. ROGALEWSKI, 
SIDNEY G. CARL, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Report of the Finance Committee 



T: the Voters of the Town of Hatfield: 

W e the finance committee wish to submit the follow- 
ing report. We would like to thank all the town officials for their 
co-operation and most particularly the school committee. 
W e want to congratulate the school committee on the splendid 
work which they have done in operating our schools within a 
much curtailed appropriation. 

The time for your annual appropriations has arrived again 
and it does not seem that the economic situation fin so far 
as our local community is concerned) has improved from that 
of a year ago. If anything we are in a worse financial condi- 
tion. 

\\ e would especially call your attention to the large per- 
centage of uncollected taxes as evidenced elsewhere in this 
report. 

We would also call your attention to the increased cost 
of the welfare department and we have been informed by the 
welfare officials that the cost would have been much more if 
it had not been for the Federal projects which are being carried 
on. . 

W hat we would especially like to call your attention to is 
the financial condition of each individual taxpayer who must 
pay for whatever we spend at this meeting. With these few 
thoughts in mind we urge you to assist in arriving at conclu- 
sions which will be for the best interests of the town and we 
most particularly urge that all participate in a discussion of 
the following budget: 



Highway Department: 

Under the provisions of Chap. 81 $5,750.00 

Bridges, sewers, sidewalks and snow removal. . . . 1,500.00 

Bonds of town officers 150.00 

Inspection of animals, barns and slaughtering 240.00 

Tree work 500.00 

Moth work 150.00 

Maintenance of Fire Department 800.00 

Insurance 876.00 

Public Welfare and equipment 6,000.00 

Interest 1.00C.00 

Salaries and expenses of town officers as follows. . . . 3.745.00 

Salaries Expenses 

Moderator $20.00 

Selectmen 240.00 3100.00 

Clerk of Board of Select- 
men 80.00 

Town Clerk . . 400.00 90.00 

Town Accountant 640.00 20.00 

Town Treasurer 480.00 50.00 

Assessors 680.00 35.00 

Tax Collector 500.00 100.00 

Sealer of Weights and 

Measures 120.00 50.00 

Election and Registration. 140. 0C 



$3,300.00 $445.00 

Employment of School Physicians $160.00 

Maintenance of Schoois 42,000.00 

Care of Cemeteries 100.00 

Maintenance of Public Library 960.00 

Memorial Day Services 100.00 

Tuition of students at Smith Agricultural School. . . 750.00 

Police protection and equipment 2,000.00 

Reserve Fund 500.00 



Unclassified accounts $200.00 

Attorney's fees 300.00 

Care of Town Hall 2,000.00 

Soldiers' Aid and Relief 200.00 

Maintenance of Water Department 1,200.00 

Interest on Town Hall notes (not in water evenue) . . 586.00 

Total $71,767.00 

We recommend that the following sum be appropri- 
ated from the available water revenue. 

Town Hall Note and Interest 6,220.50 

$77,987.50 

The committee reserve the right to change or alter these 
recommendations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. H. RICHARDS, 
FRANK A. KEMPISTY, 
DEWEY J. RYAN, 

Finance Committee. 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Hatfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen: 

1 submit herewith the report of your Town Accountant 
for the year ending December 31, 1933. 

RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 

Tax Levies — Previous years §41,663.11 

Current year, Old Age Assistance. ... 575.00 

Current year, M. V. Excise 2,490.96 

Current Year Poll 1,150.00 

Curretn Year Personal and Real 25,489.06 



$71,368.13 



From the Commonwealth: 

Income Taxes 313,441.00 

Corporation. . 1,202.84 

Bank and Trust Co 23.46 

Gas and Electric Co 311.40 

R. R. &Tel. Co 69.01 

Mass. School Fund 4,581.84 

Union Superintendent 896.28 

Vocational 3,375.62 

George Reed Fund 43.65 

Smith Hughes Fund 303.44 



324,248.54 



License Fees and Permits: 

Pool £4.00 

Peddler and Junk 56.00 

Gasoline and Denatured Alcohol 17.00 

Malt Beverages. ........ JO ..... . ; ',' 800.00 

Alcoholic Beverages 813.86 



Fines and Forfeits: 

District Court and County Jail Fines 3291.25 

Fofeit 1.00 



Dog Taxes from Town and County Treas.: 

Town 3338.40 

County 233.19 



31,690.86 



3292.25 



3571.59 



Northampton Water Dept. in lieu of taxes 

Reservoir land 42.46 

Tax Collector: 

Receipts from Collection Tax Ad's . . . 97.44 

Fire Department: 

Receipts from Card Games 49.55 



Total General Revenue 398,360.73 



DEPARTMENTAL 

Town Hall Rent. 3342.00 

Sealer's Fees . . . 61 .80 

Fire Department Sale Old Material. . . . 25.00 

Health, Hospital Bills 108.57 

Town Hall, Miscellaneous 2.30 



3539.67 



10 



Highways: 

Sale of Materials $27 AS 

Road Machinery Earnings 81.75 

Bridge Damage, etc 163.92 

2273.12 

Charities: 

Sale of Wood £188.50 

From Other Towns and Cities 482.33 

From State....; 267.89 

From State Mother's Aid 107.00 

Miscellaneous 2.00 

: £1,047.72 

Schools: 

City of Boston, Tuition City Wards. . £211.35 
Telephone Tolls .20 

£211.55 

Library: 

Fines 42.26 

Water Department: 

Collection Water Rents, 1932 £1,229.31 

Collection Water Rents, 1933 4,933.78 

£6,163.09 



Cemeteries : 

Sale of Lots £1.00 

Sale of Loarn^ 1.00 

£2.00 

Interest: 

Taxes £2,595.86 

Bank Balances. 38.99 

Cemetery Funds 34.00 

5=^" £2,668.85 

Municipal Indebtedness: 

Temporary Loans £26,000.00 

11 



Agency Trust and Investment: 

P. C. New Accounts 3200.00 

Interest on P. C. Funds 243.89 

Interest on Library Fund 120.65 

£564.54 

Refunds: 

Taxes O. A. A £18.00 

Schools 5.46 

£23.46 

Woman's Relief Project: 

C. W. A. Funds £714.00 

Teachers Contributions 6,164.50 



Total Receipts : . . . £142,775.58 

Balance on Hand, January 1, 1933 5,660.66 



Total. £148,436.14 

PAYMENTS 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen: 

Salary £300.00 

Expenses 87.48 

£387.48 

Clerk of Board of Selectmen: 

Salary £80.00 

Moderator: 

Salary £20.00 

Town Treasurer: 

Salary £480.00 

Expense ' £134.00 

■ £614.00 

12 



Tax Coliector: 

Salary 1933 Collector £225.00 

Postage, Printing and Advertising. . . . 255.35 

Deeds 24.75 

Assessors: 

Salaries §680.00 

Expense 21.47 

Attorney's Fees 

Town Clerk: 

Salary §400.00 

Expense 78.58 

Election and Registration: 

Salaries §61.50 

Ballots 12.00 

Town Accountant: 

Salary ,. 640.00 

Expense 9.61 

Town Hall Committee: 

Payment of Piano 

Dog License Fees: 

Paid to County Treasurer by Town 
Treasurer 

Town Hall Maintenance: 

Janitor Salary §906.88 

Coal 1932 Bill 289.13 

Coal 1933 Bill 448.54 

Light and Power 336.33 



§505.10 



§701.47 
§297.32 

§478.56 



§73.50 



§649.61 



§75.58 



§336.60 



13 



Janitor Supplies $49.34 

Repairs 77.88 

Miscellaneous 1.50 



$2,109.60 



Total General Government $6,328.82 



PROTECTION, PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Police: 

Salary for 1933 $1,600.00 

Salary Previous Year 83.33 

Officers 49.0C 

Telephone. 30.25 

Garage Rent - 48.00 

Gas and Oil...... .. 103.11 

Equipment and Repairs 109.78 

$2,023.47 

Fire: 

Salary of Chief $135.00 

Firemen 240.00 

Rent 50.00 

Equipment 9.25 

Hose 147.00 

Supplies 53.02 

Fuei and Light 45.29 

Stationery 1.50 

Telephone 28.36 

Gas and Oil 5.00 

; $714.42 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 

Salary $120.00 

Expense 50.00 

$170.00 

14 



Forestry and Moth Work: 

Tree, Salary and Wages $363.53 

Equipment 15.37 

Supplies 37.10 



$416.00 



Moth Work: 

Salaries and Wages $149.60 

Dike Project: 

Teams $147.20 

Material 191.45 



$338.65 



$3,812.14 



Total for Protection $3,812.14 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 

Inspection: 

Schools $160.00 

Animals, Meat and Barns 219.30 

Expense 20.70 

Diphtheria Clinic 118.00 



$518.00 



Highways: 

Salary and Wages $1,4-59.12 

Truck and Teams 32.00 

Stone and Gravel 101.85 

Equipment and Repairs 94.68 

Tar 190.60 

Lumber 307.13 

Miscellaneous 98.98 

15 



$518.00 



Snow and Ice Removal $247.79 

Street Signs 12.50 

Light 15.20 

Gas and Oil 245.11 



§2,804.96 

Highway Machinery Account: 

Tools and Repairs 3172.66 

Street Lights, 2 months $782.44 



WELFARE 

Groceries and Provisions $1,034.85 

Other Towns and Cities, Cash. ........ 1,230.70 

Town Relief, Cash .'...- 1,076.93 

Traveling expenses 227.24 

Coal and Wood 171.50 

Board and Care 374.00 

State Institutions 318.73 

Mother's Aid, Other Towns 93.33 

Old Age Relief 40.00 

Medical Aid 81.30 

Wages 19.28 

Rent 40.00 

Telephone 2C.80 

Miscellaneous 16.69 

$4,745.35 



SOLDIER'S RELIEF 

Other Towns $120.72 

State 15.36 



16 



$136.08 



SCHOOLS 

General Expenses: 

School Committee Salaries 1932-33 . . . £300.00 

District Superintendent 1,510.00 

Enforcement Officer 268.00 

Stationery and Postage 2 1 .49 

Telephone 131.65 

Traveling Expenses 183.18 

Census 25.00 

Nurse 850.00 



Teacher's Salaries: 

High £10,057.24 

Elementary 19,534.52 

Substitutes 204.00 

Vocational 351.60 

Teacher's Contributions 6,164.50 



$3,289.32 



236,311.86 



Text Books and Supplies: 

High, Books 3511.45 

High, Supplies 427.24 

Elm, Books 348.77 

Elm, Supplies 550.01 

Commercial, Books 86.50 

Commercial, Supplies and Equipment 392.17 

£2,316.14 

Transportation ' £1,950.25 

Vocational: 

Agricultural Supplies £138.93 

Agricultural Books % . . . 24.00 

Household Arts Supplies 63.37 



£226.30 



7 



7 



17 




Janitors: 

High £600.00 

Elm 2,038.49 

£2,638.49 

Fuel and Light: 

High 638.30 

Elm 2,064.65 

—— £2,702.95 

Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 

Janitor Supplies, High £36.60 

Janitor Supplies, Elm 30.97 

Repairs, Elm 193.20 

Miscellaneous, Elm 9.55 

£270,32 

Graduation Exercises and Diplomas. . . . 78.35 

Speaker 16.00 

— £94.35 

Clerical Work, High £19.00 

Athletics: 

High, Supplies £50.23 

Elm, Supplies 6.25 

£56.48 



Total for Schools £49,875.46 

SMITH'S AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition Hatfield Students £1,293.75 

— — £1,293.75 

Ten students attending for year 
June, 1933, four students attending 
December 31'33- 

18 



LIBRARY 

Salaries: 

Librarian 3341.33 

Assistants 110.00 

Janitor 97.00 

Books 434.06 

Periodicals 32.60 

Binding 57.72 

Fuel 61.75 

Light 13.96 

Postage .56 

Supplies 43.43 



INSURANCE 

Schools 368.00 

Workmen's Compensation 385.71 

Boilers, Pubiic Buildings 111.61 

Motor Equipment 261.65 

Town Clock .' 24.40 

Burglar 40.07 



MEMORIAL DAY 

Band £50.00 

Flags 20.00 

Transportation 15.50 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Bonds Town Officers £204.00 

Town Reports, Printing 104.52 

Town Reports, Delivering 11.06 



19 



?1,192.41 



£1,191.44 



£85.50 



Salary of Elector $10.00 

Printing Project 17.50 

Care of Town Clock 25.00 

Miscellaneous 8.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

Commissioners $150.00 

Labor 540.52 

Superintendent 258.60 

Pipe and Fittings 77.67 

Miscellaneous 9.10 



CEMETERIES 

Labor: 

Main Street Cemeterv 


$40.00 


Hill Cemetery 

W. Hatfield Cemetery 

X. Hatfield Cemeterv 


119.96 
15.00 
10.00 


Bradstreet Cemetery 


15.00 



INTEREST 

Temporary Loans $871.66 

Prepaid Taxes $34.57 

School House Xote (Final) 90.00 

Town Hall Xotes 2.019.00 



20 



$380.08 



$1X35.89 



$199.96 



$3,015.23 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Temporary Loans £41,000.00 

Town Hall Notes 5,000.00 

School House Note (Final) 2,000.00 

348,000.00 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 

Old Age Taxes, 1933 3706.00 

State Taxes 3,690.00 

Audit 244.15 

State Parks 7.71 

Bank Tax 3.76 

County Tax 7,819.44 

Interest of Library Bonds (Deposited) . . . 120.65 

Cemetery P. C. New Funds 200.00 

Cemetery P. C. Interest 277.89 



?13,069.60 



REFUNDS 

Taxes 3318.65 

M. V. E. Tax 58.65 

O. A. A. Tax 12.00 



3389.30 



Total Payments 3139,029.07 

Cash on Hand, Dec. 31, 1933 9,407.07 

3148,436.14 



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27 



Treasurer's Report 



John R. McGrath, Treasurer, in account with 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance on hand, Jan. 1, 1933 25,660.66 

Receipts for year 142,775.39 

?148,436.05 

Payments for 1933 per war- 
rants 2139,029.07 

Special account in First Nat- 
ional Bank 2714.00 

First National Bank 8,684.20 

Cash in office verified. ....... 8.78 

29,406.98 

- 2148,436.05 

First National Bank 

Balance December 31, 1933 218,050.59 

Balance per check book 28,684.20 

Balance per special account 714.00 

Outstanding checks December 31, 1933 

per list 8,652.39 

218,050.59 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 



28 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND OTHER FUNDS 



Fund 
Hannah W. Smith . . 

Augusta Wells 

Oliver Warner 

John H. Sanderson. . 
Luman M. Moore. . . 

P.M.Wells 

Benjamin Waite. . . . 
Abby Dickinson .... 
Silas G. Hubbard . . . 

Levi Graves 

Lucy L. Morton .... 

Charles Smith 

Lemuel B. Field .... 
Rufus H. Cowles. . . . 
Charles E. Hubbard. 

Alpheus Cowles 

James Porter 

Daniel W. Allis 

J. H. Howard 

Fannie M. Burke. . . 
Charles S. Shattuck. 
Seth W. Kingsley . . . 

E. S. Warner 

Reuben Belden 

Theodore Porter .... 
Charles L. Graves. . . 
Roswell Hubbard . . . 
Cooley D. Dickinson 



Income 
1933 

• 316.25 


Expense 
1933 
34.00 
10.00 
2.00 
4.00 
8.00 
5.00 
2.00 
3.50 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.58 
5.00 
4.00 
3.61 
3.61 
3.58 
8.00 
25.27 
3.48 
3.48 
4.00 
5.00 


Balance 
1933 
3136.49 


14.12 


404.81 


1.88 


53.83 


3.92 


111.79 


8.51 


241.85 


4.50 


127.32 


3.17 


91.38 


3.66 


104.21 


10.24 


297.14 


6.15 


176.90 


12.29 


357.04 


4.10 


117.06 


4.10 


116.27 


4.17 


118.41 


4.38 
3.99 


124.95 
113.43 


3.58 


109.51 


5.34 


152.06 


3.85 


108.95 


3.61 


, 110.82 


3.61 

3.58 


110.63 
109.45 


6.70 


208.47 


3.27 


100.00 


3.48 


106.18 


3.48 


106.22 


3.71 


105.23 


4.66 


131.73 



29 



Elijah Bardwell £14.40 

Joseph D. Billings . . 3.68 

Edward C. Billings 29.09 

Augusta Beals 3.51 

Anthony Douglas 2.23 

J. E. Porter 3.64 

Jonathan Graves 3.68 

Hugh McLeod 3.66 

B. M.Warner 7.31 

Chester Hastings 3.64 

Lucius & Stearns Curtis .... 9.89 

Frary & Gardner 3.54 

Henry C. Batchellor 3.32 

T. F. Knight & Jno Porter. . 14.16 

H. W. Carl... 2.63 

Scott & Herman Harris 5.95 

Thaddeus & Solomon Graves 7.08 
Perpetual Care Funds Received 
Paid Out Care of Lots. ...... 

Hatfield Library Fund, Inter 

est on Mortgage 122.21 215.16 

NEW ACCOUNTS 

J.D.Brown $1.50 J51.50 S100.00 

Mary E. Hubbard 100.00 

J. R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 



?4.00 


3418.79 


4.00 


104.64 


22.50 


629.06 


3.51 


107.29 


4.00 


57.24 


4.00 


103.24 


3.50 


104.82 


4.00 


103.70 


4.00 


227.24 


3.50 


103.42 


8.00 


282.16 


4.00 


1C0.51 


3.32 


101.26 


8.00 


407.51 


2.00 


100.63 


5.95 


200.00 


8.0C 


201.75 




240.89 




240.89 



30 



Assessor's Report 



Value of assessed buildings 31,524,795.00 

Value of assessed land 946,480.00 

Value of assessed real estate 2,471,275.00 

Value of assessed personal estate 169,570.00 

Value of assessed real and personal estate. .... 2,640,845.00 

Rate of tax per 31,000.00 22.00 

Number of polls assessed 705 

Number of horses assessed 274 

Number of cows assessed 252 

Number of neat cattle assessed 32 

Number of sheep assessed 400 

Number of fowl assessed 360 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 468 

Number of automobiles assessed 597 

Acres of land assessed 8,943 

Town appropriation 378,050.99 

State tax 3,690.00 

State audit tax 244.15 

State parks tax 7.71 

County tax 7,819.44 

Overlayings 2,508.73 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Income tax 313,112.01 

Corporation tax 1,265.21 

Bank tax 28.28 

Excise tax 2,300.00 

Licenses 700.00 

Fines 300.00 



31 



Schools 

Grants State Relief 

General Government 

Available Funds 

All others 

ADDITIONAL ASSESSMENTS 

1 Poll at £2.00 

1 Old Age Assistance Tax at £1.00 

Real Estate 



£7,500.00 

201.93 

200.00 

5,800.00 

2,815.00 



£2.00 

1.00 

16.50 

5519.50 



VALUE OF PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Under Chap. 59, General Laws 

Church Property £68,000.00 

Town property. 339,705.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery 3,500.00 

Smith Academy 66,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
JOHN E. RAFFA, 
JOSEPH D. DONNIS. 



32 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS 1933 

BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 

Male Female 

January 2 2 

February 1 1 

March 1 2 

April 2 

May 1 

June 2 

July 3 

August 4 3 

September 

October 2 3 

November 1 2 

December 3 2 

Total 21 16 

BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 

Fathers Mothers 

United States 30 32 

Poland 6 4 

Czecho-Slovaka 1 1 

Total 37 37 

BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


54 


35 


40 


28 


31 



33 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS— 1933 



January. . . . 1 

February ... 1 

March 

April 

May 2 

June 3 

July 2 

August 3 

September . . 4 

October 3 

November. . 3 

Total 22 



First marriage of both 19 

Second of Groom 2 

Second of Bride 1 

Youngest Groom j 19 

Oldest Groom 51 

Youngest Bride 17 

Oldest Bride 48 

Birthplace Groom Bride 

United States 21 20 

Poland 1 2 



22 



22 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 
1933 



Karpinski, Walter A. 
Zima, Paul 
Ziembicki, Joseph 
Weber, Emma Lucy 
Strong, Clara Bardwell 
Strysco, Roman 
Jones, Fannie White 
Cechvala, John 
Belden, Oscar E. 
Wendolowski, Chester 
Converse, Sarah Ann 
Dwight, Silas Sadler 
Stenglein, John J. 
Arloski, Charles 
Brusco, Stephen 
Hilbert, Margaret P. 



Ryan, James H. 
Szczepanski, Adam 
Korza, Paul 
Slycz, Joseph 
Wickles, Anton 
Shea, Louise 
Staszko, Anna 
Holley, Hattie M. 
Pease, Hattie L. 
Morton, Charles K. 
Boyle, Margaret H. 
Stoddard, Joseph E. 
Vishaway, Sylvia 
Wentworth, Alice H. 
Vollinger, Bernard 
Keating, James 



34 



Kociela, Sophie Meekins, Florence A. 

Senkoski, Walter Sczych, Andrew 

Kiley, Mary G. 
Oldest person (male) 91 years. 



DOGS LICENSED 
1933 

130 Males at ?2.00 each 3260.00 

14 Females at $5.00 each 70.00 

17 Females spayed at #2.00 each 34.00 

£364.00 
Less 161 fees at 20 cents each 32.20 

$337,80 
Paid to Town Treasurer 337.80 



V. H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 



35 



Report of Librarian 



To the Trustees of the Public Library: 

During the year 1933, 298 books were added to the library. 
3 were gifts and 295 were purchased. Of these 104 were for the 
juvenile department and 38 were non-fiction. 

The circulation of books and magazines was 19,642. There 
are 695 borrowers. 

In September, our very efficient assistant, Gertrude Boyle, 
left us to take a position in Hartford. Margaret Hayes is taking 
her place. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 

Librarian. 



36 



Tax Collector's Report 



1933 POLL AND PROPERTY TAX 

December 31, 1933 

Commitment per Warrant $57,413.09 

Payments to Treasurer $26,654.27 

By Abatements . 125.73 

Advance Payments Refunded 162.46 

$26,942.46 
Outstanding December 31, 1933 $30,470.63 

1933 OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAX 

Commitment per Warrant . . $706.00 

Payments to Treasurer $575.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 131.00 

1933 MOTOR VEHICLE TAX 
December 31, 1933 

Commitment per Warrant $3,254.33 

Payments to Treasurer $2,491.27 

By Abatements 143.94 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 $619.12 

JAMES L. McGRATH, 

Tax Collector. 



37 



Police Report 



Hatfield, Mass., 
December 31, 1933. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 



The report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1933, is herewith submitted. 

Drunkenness ... 11 

Automobile Violations 9 

Breaking and Entering . . 5 

Assault and Battery 4 

Larceny ' 10 

Neglect of Wife 2 

Road Laws 3 

Liquor Laws 2 

Vagrancy 4 

Returned to Federal Hospitai . . . 3 

Committed to State Farm 3 

Brought to Tewksbury 7 

Committed to State Hospital 3 

66 
Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



38 



Report of the Water Commissioners 



Your Water Commissioners the past year have tried to 
keep expenses down as much as possible. 

We have had some difficulty in collecting our water rents 
but to date have not taken any extreme measures to make 
collections. There are takers who have co-operated with us 
to the fullest extent which we appreciate very much but un- 
fortunately there are others who do not seem to be making 
any effort to pay. 

We are very much adverse to shutting off the water from 
any taker but unless some of the back sliders do something 
soon we will be obliged to resort to measures that will be un- 
pleasant for us all. 

Do you want to go back to the old pump? If not pay 
your bill. 

JOHN W. KILEY, 
LAURENCE A. DE1NLE1N, 
ROSWELL G. BILLINGS, 

Wacer Board. 



39 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE BOARD 
OF SELECTMENT FOR 1934. 



George Betsold 
Luther A. Belden 
Raymond Balise 
William E. Boyle 
Sidney G. Carl 
William R. Cutter 
William P. Connelly 
George A. Deinlein 
Lawrence A. Doppman 
Ercent Godin 
Harry E. Graves 
John Fusek 
Fred G. Howard 
Michael Hayes 
James W. Kiley 
Thomas Mullaney 
David Mullaney 
Arthur Proulx 
Stanley Rogalewski 
Charles Pnffer 
Frank A. Kempesti 
John F. Sheehan 
Joseph Slussars 
Walter Sudivan 
Leo Wilkes 
John M. Wentzel 
Leonard Vollinger 
Edward Zaskey 
Alfred E. Breor 



40 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending Dec. 31, 1933 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Bardwell, Chairman Term expires, 1935 

Harold J. Morse, Secretary Term expires, 1936 

J. Henry Charlebois Term expires, 1934 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

William E. Hebard 
72 Ridgewood Terrace, Northampton Telephone 1088 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M. D. R. C. Byrnes, M. D. 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur F. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 

As of October 1, 1933 

Boys Girls Total 

Between 5 and 7 '....' 34 45 79 

Between 7 and 14. . 203 193 396 

Between 14 and 16 76 82 158 

313 320 633 

There was a decrease in the census from the preceding 
year of 48 pupils. 

43 



SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1934 



ALL SCHOOLS 

Winter Term commences January 2, 1934. 

Spring Term will close June 15th. 

Sometime between those dates and about Easter, April 
1st, there will be a vacation of ten days for Smith Academy 
and one of two weeks for the spring crop planting. 

Fall Term Opens Tuesday, September 4th. 

Closes Friday, December 21st at noon. 

HOLIDAY NOTES 

There will be no sessions of school on the holidays and 
Good Friday. 

The following are the legal holidays for this Common- 
wealth: 

January 1st February 22nd 

April 19th May 30th 

July 4th Labor Day, September 4tb 

October 12th November 11th 

Thanksgiving and Christmas 

Schools will close at noon on the Wednesday before Thanks- 
giving. 



44 



Report of School Committee 

To the Citizens of Hatfield: 

The principal activity of the School Committee in 1933 
was an effort to make a considerable reduction in school ex- 
pense without lowering the standard of your schools. 

These reductions were made in keeping with the appro- 
priation given us for the year. 

1. Closing the West Hatfield School Building. This 
saved salaries of two Teachers, Janitor and heating the build- 
ing. 

2. Closing the Bradstreet School room, saving salary 
of one Teacher and heat. 

3. Discontinuing the Household Arts course at the 
High School. 

4. Accepting a 20 per cent voluntary contribution to the 
Town Treasury from all Teachers from February 1 to Decem- 
ber 31 and a 20 per cent reduction in salary of all employees 
of your School Department. 

The cost of bus transportation was increased some by 
the larger number of students being transported to the Center 
School. 

The School Committee wish to thank all Parents, Students 
and Teachers for their co-operation in this readjustment of 
our School maintenance this year. 

The committee feel that with the continued co-operation 
of the teaching force and school employees for the year 1934 
that it will be possible to maintain our Schools at a cost in 
proportion to the past year's budget without in any way 
effecting the efficiency of our present school system. 

For the expenses of schools we refer you to the Town 
Accountant's Report. 

A. C. BARDWELL, 
J. HENRY CHARLEBOIS, 
H. J. MORSE. 

45 



Report of Superintendent of Schools 



To the School Committee and Citizens of Hatfield: 

Herewith is my third annual report as superintendent of 
your schools and in accord with the economic interest it will be 
frankly brief. 

The enrollment for the entire town at the close of schools 
for the recent Christmas 'vacation showed the following grade 
distribution: 
I II III IV V IV VII VIII Smith 

Academy .tf^sL fy 
49 43 56 63 71 62 70 47 155 61 

Of the 155 in Smith Academy 58 are Freshmen, a greater num- 
ber than in any of the first three grades. The decrease in total n 
enrollment was 43 from the 1932 figure and 77 less than 1931. 
For the next five years the size of the Academy enrollment 
will be in unusual proportion to the total for the town. 

No doubt the committee in their section of the report will 
tell of the consolidations and changes made in the fiscal year 
to meet the budget reduction. I shall make a few pertinent 
comments. The elimination of small schools and the trans- 
portation of the pupils to larger centers is in line with present 
school tendencies and it had my hearty approval. I did not 
imagine when I suggested the change a year ago that only 
one bus would be contracted to cover all the conveyance 
needed. I believe that the parents are entitled to less crowded 
bus conditions. Nevertheless they must also remember that 
added service and convenience means added expense of opera- 
tion all of which reflects into the school budget. 

46 






I did not recommend the discontinuance of the House- 
hold Arts courses, and particularly after an apparently fav- 
orable vote at the annual meeting. In these days when the 
opportunities for employment for youths of high school age are 
becoming more restricted then it would appear to be logical 
to widen the scope of educational offerings and not withdraw 
some offerings. My preference to meet the reduced budget 
would have been to carry on that department with the other 
school activities and close a week or ten days in December. 

Candidly I think some of the salary account saved by the 
closing of the smaller schools should be used in restoring the 
Household Arts courses and also provide for another assistnta 
in the Academy to take classes in English and commercial 
subjects. I doubt if the State Supervisor of Secondary Educa- 
tion will continue to assign Class A rating to Smith Academy 
without extra teaching. 

I shall venture a guess that in the next ten years there 
will be devolved a different type of program for the large num- 
ber of pupils who go to high school with no intention of going 
anywhere else after graduation. 1 think the school day for 
them will be longer and with very little home work for either 
pupil or teacher. Courses will be for the sole purpose to fit 
the graduates to enter into the life of his community. Voca- 
tional and commercial attributes will be dominant factors 
in making the curriculum. 

It is my impression that the general attitude toward your 
teachers has been pathetic. Many of them are residents and 
more of them have served with credit and satisfaction for 
years in your town. A more friendly attitude should be re- 
sumed or the morale of your teaching force will be under- 
mined. 

Perhaps one of the rooms at the Hill School will not be 
needed when the next school year opens. In case only one room 
was necessary it might be possible to use the West Hatfield — 
and a more modern structure — in alternate years and reverse 
the transportation. Then the bus service would be in an opposite 
direction rather than in addition to the present numbers. 

47 



In my earlier experience in the Maine towns quite often ses- 
sions would be held in different schoolhouses from term to term 
so that the inconvenience of transportation would be shared 
by all families and each locality would have school in its own 
building sometime during the year. 

When it was first advocated to retrench I allowed the 
services of the drawing supervisor — and penmanship — to be 
discontinued. In the two years I can see a general lack of in- 
terest in penmanship about the town and union. Sometimes 
I think the drawing has been better correlated with other 
work. However 1 do believe that as soon as money is available — 
or perhaps make it available — for the return of a supervisor of 
penmanship and drawing in the schools in September. As 
far as expense is concerned a teacher working only in Hatfield 
for 3800 brings back more reimbursement to the town than a 
teacher shared with another town. Anyway 1 hope to see this 
service return shortly. 

For fear that a deeper reduction in the school appropria- 
tion might be construed by officials to mean a cessation of the 
agricultural courses I shall give a determination of the per 
capita cost in those courses as furnished me by the adminis- 
trator of the vocational division, as follows: 

Financial Statement from Massachusetts Department of 

Education 

These figures are for state reimbursement year ending 
August 31, 1933. 

Actual reimbursement for this period will be received 
in 1934. 

Salary Expenditures by Hatfield for Director, and Teachers 
of Agriculture for year ending August 31, 1933: 

Part salary of Principal Burke 339.39 

Salary of teachers, Burke, Boyle, Fitz- 
gerald 2,840.45 



-32,879.84 



48 



2/3 Salary 31,919.89 

Less }/o receipts from federal funds 173.54 

RECEIPTS [State Reimbursement. . . $1,746.35* 

BY J Smith-Hughes 303.04 

HATFIELD ] George Reed 43.65 

[Salary contributions. . . . 304.59 

22,397.63 



Cost to Hatfield on basis of salary ex- 
penditure ?482.21* 

Other costs for supplies, etc., not in- 
cluded for reimbursement 377.33 

Net Cost to Hatfield 3859.54* 

Total Expenditures by Hatfield §3,257.17 

Total Receipts by Hatfield 2,397.63 



Net Cost to Hatfield ?859.54 

Membership Statistics 

Enrollment 41 

Average Membership 27.6 

Average Attendance 27. 1 

Percapita cost to Hatfield on basis of net cost and average 
membership was 231.14. 

The asterisks *** were inserted by myself to call atten- 
tion to the fact that by reason of his principalship of academic 
instruction, Principal Burke drew reimbursement in the Gen- 
eral School Fund by ?400. Thus the actual cost of instruction 
is further reduced by that figure. 

I shall terminate my report with some comparative fig- 
ures based on the average cost per pupil in average mem- 
bership for the last school year which closed in June, 1933. 

49 



Hatfield Commonwealth 

Administration $3.64 $3.53 

Instruction 50.91 65.27 

Books and Supplies 2.68 3.06 

Janitor and Fuel and Light 10.49 9.61 

Transportation 2.52 1.92 

Health 1.69 1.46 

Repairs and Upkeep 66 3.12 

Valuation per pupil 4,240.00 9,525.00 

School Support from Local Taxation . 50.08 82.46 
Average cost per pupil per day Local 

Taxation 28 .46 

Average Days in Session 179 179 

State Reimbursement per pupil 22.72 8.92 

Average Cost Locally for Vocational 

pupils . . . 31.14 

In conclusion I wish to thank the teachers for their splendid 
co-operation and all others who by word and intention have 
contributed to the success of the schools of Hatfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HEBARD, 

Superintendent of Schools for 

Hadley and Hatfield. 

January 23, 1934. 



50 



Principal of Smith Academy 



To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee 
of Hatfield : 

1 hereby submit my fourth annual report as Principal of 
Smith Academy. The opening registration was 163, divided 
as follows: Seniors, 25; Juniors, 40; Sophomores, 36; Fresh- 
men, 62. 

The enrollment in Smith Academy at present is 152, with 
58 in the entering class. This is the largest enrollment and 
the largest entering class in the history of the school. It is 
interesting to note the steady increase in Smith Academy 
attendance during the last few years. In 1929 the enrollment 
was 88, with a faculty group made up of as many teachers 
as there are on the present staff. Last ye.ar the enrollment 
was 139, and in 1931 the figure was 137. 

The graduating class of 1933 numbered 18. Of this number, 
3 entered M. S. C; 4 entered Commercial College, either as 
day or evening students; 1 entered Preparatory School; and 
5 plan to enter Training Schools for Nurses within the year. 

The school curriculum was placed out of balance when 
the two-year Household Arts course was dropped last June. 
Heretofore, the curriculum consisting of the Classical, Scientific, 
General, Commercial, Household Arts, and Agricultural Courses, 
seemed broad enough to furnish equality of opportunity for 
every pupil of secondary school age in Hatfield. This much- 
to-be- desired condition does not exist today, and developments 
since the opening of school last fall, bear out my early pre- 
dictions as to what would happen if and when the course was 
dropped. It was probably thought by some, that the girls 
enrolled in the Household Arts Course would elect other courses 
in school and continue their high school education. To be 
sure, some did elect of the remaining courses, but the lamen- 
table side of the whole situation is that of last year's Freshmen 



51 



Household Arts Class, 7 left school; 2 prospective Household 
Arts Freshmen failed to enter, and 2 Freshmen who did enter, 
left school because the Household Arts Course was dropped 
from the curriculum. Last Spring there were 17 prospective 
Freshmen who signified their desire to elect this course, who 
with 13 girls already enrolled in the work, would have made 
a class of 30 girls in Household Arts work for the present school 
year. This number really exceeds that required or recommended 
by the State Department of Education for classes of this 
type of work. This readily shows that there is a distinct demand, 
from pupils and parents alike, for this course. 

Another phase of the unbalanced curriculum is that the 
former Household Arts girls, from necessity rather than choice, 
are now enrolled in several College Preparatory Classes where 
they can neither do justice to themselves or to the other class 
members, who really plan to enter some higher institution 
of learning. Satisfactory scholastic results will not be forth- 
coming from either pupils or teachers, when this condition 
exists. 

Another teacher is needed to relieve the Study Hall prob- 
lem and the over-crowded Commercial and English Depart- 
ments. Under present conditions, every teacher is carrying a 
heavy Class and Study Hall schedule which allows for little 
or no time for organization and direction of such student activi- 
ties as Language and Science Clubs, Debates, School Paper, 
Student Conferences, and allied projects. 

The Athletic Program continues to function in a conser- 
vative but successful manner. Coach John B. Kallock piloted 
the basketball team to another Hampshire League Champion- 
ship in what was perhaps the most hectic race in the history 
of the league. A restricted baseball and complete soccer schedule 
were carried out. Volley ball in the lall and spring, and basket- 
ball, complete the list of activities for the girls. 

Physical examinations conducted by School Physician 
Robert Byrne, M. D. and School Nurse Marion D. Holmes, 
R. N., were given all students at the opening of School Year, 
and a second examination is held before the student enters 



52 



active team competition. A program to include physical educa- 
tion for all was realiy put in operation last fall when several 
activities periods found every boy and girl engaged in some 
form of physical exercise. While the excellent facilities of the 
Memorial Town Hall are available, the continuance of this 
activity program for all, during the winter months is impossible 
until a system of lockers is installed. This project requires 
80 lockers and it is hoped a start can be made in securing, in 
part at least, this equipment this year. 

A system of monthly instead of bi-monthly report cards 
to parents was instituted this year. The work of the high 
school cannot be done successfully without regular attendance 
and daily home study. Parents are urged to visit the school 
frequently and consult with teachers, for co-operation of 
school and home is necessary for the best results. 

Several changes occurred in the personnel of the faculty 
during the year. Mrs. Marian D. Glasheen, Household Arts 
instructor for the past four years, and Mr. Frank K. Dillon — 
vice principal and instructor in science for the past three years, 
completed their services lasr June. During these years they 
served faithfully and well the interest of their constitueunts. 
Personally, 1 am appreciative of their loyal support afforded me 
during their tenure of offi.ce. 

Mr. Clarence J. Larkin, for several years principal of the 
Center School, succeeds Mr. F. K. Dillon as vice principal 
and instructor in mathematics. He is carrying on in his new 
position in the same efficient manner which characterized his 
work previously at the Center School. 

1 wish to thank the members of the faculty for their con- 
tinued and hearty co-operation in every movement affecting 
the welfare and happiness of the boys and girls of Hatfield. 

The most pressing needs of the school are to my mind 
as follows: 

1 — An additional teacher to assist in English and Com- 
mercial departments. 

•53 



2 — A school library and study hall should be established 
on the third floor of the Academy. Under present conditions 
pupils are spending their study periods in rooms where recita- 
tions are being held. This is not a satisfactory condition. 

3 — Some sort of a ventilation system should be installed 
as the only fresh air intake now possible is by means of the 
open windows. During the colder months this condition is not 
a satisfactory one either from the physical or financial stand- 
point. 

4 — Installation of steel lockers for the physical education 
classes. 

Finally, 1 wish to express my appreciation of the loyal 
support and co-operation of the Superintendent, members of 
the School Committee and Board of Trustees of Smith Academy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD J. BURKE, 

Principal. 



54 



Report of Music Supervisor 



Music today is looked upon as a great factor in educa- 
tion. No subject is more attractive or contributes more to the 
cultural or moral developement of the child. 

The study of music includes, English, in the classics set 
to melody; mathematics, in the disposition of time problems 
and rhythmn; Health Education in its developement of lungs 
and muscles, its influence upon temperament, poise and posture. 
It correlates with history and geography in the folk and national 
songs, songs of homeland, mountain, stream and forest. 

Music is of the greatest value in developing mental alert- 
ness and concentration through thinking instantly of a syl- 
lable, of pitch and of tone value. It develops self control in 
singing melodies at sight and in performing individually before 
the class and in public. 

All of these points we are striving to build up in our pupils 
and although we cannot definitely measure the progress made 
we feel that something has been accomplished along these 
lines. 

As in former years musical programs have been prepared 
in connection with the various holidays, Memorial Day, Prize 
Speaking and Commencement. The Smith Academy chorus 
sang practically all of the Commencement music from memory. 

Smith Academy has perhaps the best balanced chorus 
that we have had in a number of years. There is the material 
to develope a very fine type of work with this chorus. However 
we must have the absolute co-operation of the individual 
student to get results. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to our superin- 
tendent, school committee, principals and teachers for their 
interest and co-operation. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 

55 



Supervisor of Health Education 

HATFIELD, 1933 



To the Superintendent and 
Members of the School Committee: 

The key-note of the nation's interest today is the health 
and happiness of children, not from the view point of the 
altruist and economist only, but from the view point of com- 
mon interest and sympathy for children as children, as well as, 
children "the assets of the nation." 

In the school we find children, good or bad, clever or 
dull, according to what is required of them, but all natural and 
free, not over-impressed by the weight of responsibility massed 
up against them 'as the hope of posterity'. Ail this being true, 
what can the school do to prepare the children to meet this 
responsibility? "we teach an individual or child, only what 
they desire to learn" is a pedagogical theory, then the aim of 
any form of education is to prepare the mind of the individual 
or child to appreciate the need and value of knowledge and the 
method of using that knowledge to advantage. 

The first requirement for successful living, as a rule, is 
Health. Step by step health teaching has progressed from the 
fundamental practice of daily health habits as a duty to the 
practice of good health habits as a scientific principle. Teach- 
ing the child the negative value of personal hygiene, as a duty, 
gets the child but a short distance beyond the starting point, 
but teaching personal hygiene as an expression of self-respect 
and personal responsibility appeals to the natural ego of the 
smallest tot as well as to adolescent children stimulating self- 
confidence and free expression. A new necktie, a pretty dress, 
even a gold star placed on the back of a clean hand has worked 
wonders in solving problems in the class room and in the 
home. 

56 



There are as many methods of putting this over as there 
are individual minds but the objective is not changed — putting 
the desire and responsibility up to the child, — children love 
responsibility, but we take it away in our strenuous efforts to 
reach the maximum too quickly. 

The mental health of the child is a delicate instrument 
too long overshadowed by the stress given to the physical, 
not that the physical is less important but the mental approach 
to the physical has changed. The teaching of nutrition has 
changed, probably more than any other factor, gross tonnage 
is not the objective, but "posture," "bright clear eyes", "clean 
skin and hair' cheerfulness and "pep" are the goals held up 
to the growing child. The 3rd grade child will tell you "why 
they should drink milk," "go to bed early," "eat fruit and 
vegetables," "see your dentist twice a year." Why? because 
it is the thing to do, of course, no dispute about it. Who wants 
to be a flop? 

"How much have I gained this year?" "Will you test 
my eyes, they seem to blur?" "Look at my teeth, I had them 
fixed last week!" are remarks hurled at me every day. This 
interest is healthy. A sincere desire to appear well and to get 
full value out of living expressed in the lingo well understood 
by any one working with youth today. 

This progress in Health Education is not spectacular or 
accidental. It is difficult to frame or evaluate daily contacts, 
common interest, co-operation and understanding in any 
branch of education, health education, especially. 

The Health Service of the pupils medical and physical 
examination was carried on as usual, special attention given 
to students taking part in athletics. 

The Toxin-Anti-Toxin clinic for the prevention of diph- 
theria put on by the District and Local Health Boards assisted 
by the School Board was a splendid project in disease preven- 
tion. Of the 350 children signed, 344 received the 3rd inocu- 
lation, 100 being pre-school children, ages ranging from 8 
months to 5 years. 

57 



The Chadwick clinic follow-up X-ray and chest exam- 
ination was held in November. Two high school students 
were discharged and the 15 remaining reported improved. 
This service will be continued in 1934. The presence and in- 
terest of the local physicians in both these clinics helped, 
materially, to make for success. Three boys of the Chadwick 
clinic were given four weeks at the Health Camp conducted 
by the Hampshire County Public Health and returned home 
much improved in health. Through the interest of Dr. Bonne- 
ville, four children were tested at the Shriner's Hospital for 
Crippled Children in Springfield, one child has returned to 
school, the others are still under supervision. 

The Health Service presents the following list of defects 
corrected : 

Dental defects, Red Cross Dental Clinic 174 

Dental defects, Private Dentist. 98 

Total 272 

Vision defects corrected or improved 26 

Nose and throat defects corrected 18 

Nutritional defects corrected or improved 36 

Total 352 

Health Teaching Service, September 1932-33 
High School — 16 Freshmen girls — 2 periods weekly. 
Physiology, Hugiene, Nutrition. 
10 Sophomore girls. 2 periods weekly. 
Red Cross Home Hygiene. 
October, 1933 
Centre School — 18 girls Junior Home Hygiene, 1 hour weekly. 
18 boys Junior First Aid, 1 hour weekly. 
This report of the health work in the school is submitted 
to all members of the school faculty and pupils in sincere 
appreciation of co-operation and inspiration. 

Respectfully presented, 

MARIAN HOLMES, R. N. 
January, 1934. 

58 • 



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Teachers 
E. J. Burke, 
Principal 
Clarence J. Larkin, 


Principal 
Mary G. Moriarty 
Sarah V. Kiley 
Anna C. Donnis 
Catherine Shea 
Grace W. Bardwell 
Katherine Hayes 
Mary F. Ahearn 
Susan Petcen 
Marie A. Proulx 
Constance Mullany 
Eleanor Whalen 
Harold L. Ford 
Anna Osley 
Vera M. Lynch 
Mary D. Donelson 
Kathleen Connelly 
Ehen M. O'Hara 
Lena Fitzgerald 


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61 




HENRY F. LONG 

COMMISSIONER 



THEODORE N. WADDELL 
DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTS 



Jbpartment of GLorporatums ano taxation 

^Bi6tsion of Recounts 

January 27, 1934. 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. John W. Mullins, Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen: 

1 submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1933, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
44 of the General Laws. This is in the form of a report made 
to me by Mr. Edward H. Fenton, Chief Accountant of this 
Division. 

Very truly yours, 

Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts. 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the financial year 
ending December 31, 1933, and submit the following report 
thereon: 

The financial transactions, as recorded en the books of 
the departments receiving or disbursing money for the town 
or committing bills for collection, were examined, checked, 
and verified. 

The town has two tax collectors, one of whom is in charge 
of the collection of 1932 and prior years taxes, while another is 
charged with the collection of 1933 taxes. The collector for 
1932 and prior years' taxes stated, when his books and records 
were requested, that he had no cash on hand and that there 
was a shortage in his accounts which could be determined from 
stubs of receipted tax bills showing taxes collected but not 
entered on the tax books or paid to the treasurer. The stubs 
as received from the collector were as follows. 

Taxes of 1931, 1] stubs aggregating 2608.27 

Taxes of 1932, 120 stubs aggregating 1,728.54 

Old age assistance taxes 1932, 90 stubs aggregat- 
ing 90.00 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 1931, 6 stubs aggre- 
gating 67.53 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 1932, 47 stubs aggre- 
gating 257.73 

Interest on above taxes 65.20 

$2,817.27 
• 63 



To this amount of $2,817.27 should be added the sum 
of $1.97 due from the collector since the previous audit on the 
levy of 1931, while credit should be given to him on account 
of his overpayments to the treasurer as shown in the previous 
audit report, as follows: 

Total amount due from collector on account of 

collections not entered on cash books $2,817.27 

Add amount due on taxes 1931, per previous audit 1.97 



$2,819.24 
Deduct overpayments to treasurer by 
collector, per previous audit: 

Taxes 1930 $ .34 

Taxes 1932 27.40 

$27.74 

Collector's Cash Discrepancy (Joseph J. Yarrows, 

Collector) $2,791.50 

Mr. Yarrows resigned as tax collector for 1932 and prior 
years on January 14, 1934. 

The accounts of the tax collectors were examined and 
checked. The taxes remaining outstanding at the time of the 
previous examination were audited, and all subsequent com- 
mitments of real estate, personal, poll, old age assistance, 
and motor vehicle excise taxes were proved with the assessors' 
commitment warrants. The recorded collections were checked 
to the commitment books, the payments to the treasurer were 
verified by a comparison with the treasurer's cash book and 
the accountant's ledger, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved with the ledger accounts. 

A further verification of the outstanding accounts was 
obtained by sending notices to a number of persons whose 
names appeared on the books as owing money to the town, 
including all outstanding accounts of 1932 and prior years' 
taxes, and from the replies received to date it would appear 

64 



that the outstanding accounts, as listed, are correct. However, 
should proof be submitted by a taxpayer of the payment of a 
tax which has not been credited to him by the collector, the 
amount of the collector's discrepancy would be increased 
thereby. 

The surety bonds of the town clerk, treasurer, tax col- 
lector, and collector of water charges for the faithful perform- 
ance of their duties were examined and found to be in proper 
form. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined and checked. The recorded receipts and payments 
were compared with the treasurer's books, the appropriations 
as listed in the ledger were checked with the town clerk's 
record of town meetings, and all ledger accounts were checked 
with the books of original entry. The ledger was analyzed, 
the necessary adjustments were made, a trial balance was 
taken off, and a balance sheet, which is appended to this report, 
was prepared showing the financial condition of the town on 
December 31, 1933. 

It is recommended that the accountant take off a trial 
balance of the ledger as frequently as once each month in order 
that possible errors may be located and promptly corrected. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts were 
compared with the accounts in the departments collecting 
money for the town and with the other sources from which 
money was paid into the town treasury, while the payments 
were checked with the selectmen's warrants authorizing the 
treasurer to disburse town funds. The cash book was footed, 
and the cash balance on January 6, 1934, was verified by an 
actual count of the cash on hand and by proving the bank 
balances with statements received from the bank. 

The recorded receipts of the town clerk for dog and sport- 
ing licenses were checked with the records of licenses issued, 
and the payments to the town treasurer and the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were verified. 

65 



The town clerk's cash on hand on January 6, 1934, was 
proved by an actual count. 

The recorded receipts from licenses granted by the select- 
men were checked with the stubs of licenses issued, and the 
payments to the treasurer were verified by a comparison with 
the treasurer's cash book. 

The receipts for town hall rentals were checked with the 
book record of such rentals kept by the custodian, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer were checked, and the outstanding 
accounts were listed. 

The recorded collections of the sealer of weights and 
measures were checked with the records of work done, and 
the payments to the treasurer were verified by a comparison 
with the treasurer's recorded receipts. 

The accounts receivable of the health, highway, and 
public welfare departments were checked with the commit- 
ments shown on the ledger. The collections and disallowances 
were listed and checked and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and reconciled with the accountant's ledger. 

It appears that departmental accounts are not committed 
regularly and that, in several cases, bills rendered have not 
been set up on the ledger. It is recommended that all bills 
due the town be sent out for collection promptly and that 
all accounts receivable be set up on the ledger without delay. 

The recorded collections of library fines by the librarian 
were checked, and the payments to the treasurer were verified. 
The librarian's cash on hand on January 16, 1934, was proved 
by an actual count. 

The water department accounts were examined. The 
commitments were proved, the collections and abatements 
were checked, the payments to the treasurer were verified, 
and the outstanding •accounts were listed and proved with the 
accountant's ledger. It was noted that abatements granted 

66 



have not been reported to the accountant and were therefore 
entered during the audit. It is again recommended that water 
commitments and abatements be reported promptly to the 
accountant, so that the accountant's ledger may at all times 
show the true condition of the water department accounts. 

The savings bank books representing the investments 
of trust funds in the custody of the treasurer were examined 
and listed. The income was proved and the withdrawals were 
verified. 

Appended to this report, in addition to the balance sheet, 
are tables showing a reconciliation of the treasurer's cash, 
summaries of the tax and departmental accounts, as well as 
tables showing the trust fund transactions. 

For the co-operation received from the several town 
officials while engaged in making the audit, I wish, on behalf 
of my assistants and for myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edw. H. Fenton, 
Chief Accountant. 



67 



RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance January 1, 1933, per previous 

audit £5,660.66 

Receipts 1933 142,775.48 

$148,436.14 

Payments 1933 $139,029.07 

Balance December 31, 1933 9,407.07 

2148,436.14 

Balance January 1, 1934 £9,407.07 

Receipts January 1 to 6, 1934 948.45 

Excess cash 1.91 

$10,357.43 

Balance January 6, 1934: 

First National Bank of Northampton: 

Regular account $8,686.20 

Special deposit 714.00 

Cash in office, verified 957.23 

$10,357.43 



First National Bank of Northampton 

Regular Account 

Balance January 6, 1934, per statement $17,336.59 

Balance January 6, 1934, per check book $8,686.20 
Outstanding checks January 6, 1934, per 

list 8,650.39 

$17,336.59 



Special Deposit 

Balance January 6, 1934, per statement.' $714.00 

Balance January 6, 1934, per check book $714.00 



68 



TAXES— 1929 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Overpayment to treasurer, refunded $1.30 

Overpayment to treasurer, per previous audit $1.30 



TAXES— 1930 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector . 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit $1,961.02 

Audit adjustment: 

Error in transfer to tax titles ' .01 

Overpayment to treasurer, to be re- 
funded .34 

Payments to treasurer $1,155.74 

Transfer to tax titles: 

Reported .' $601.81 

Not reported 95.10 

696.91 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list 108.72 



$1,961.37 



$1,961.37 



TAXES— 1931 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit $17,693.13 

Overpayment to collector, adjusted .02 

$17,693.15 

Payments to treasurer $ J 4,974.27 

Transfer to tax titles: 

Reported $1,129.36 

Not reported. . . ', . 502.91 

1,632.27 

69 



Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list $476.37 

Due from collector December 31, 1933, 

and January 6, 1934 , 610.24 

217,693.15 



TAXES— 1932 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit 343, 303.43 

Overpayments: 

Refunded . ... $154.89 

Adjusted 2.97 

157.86 

Overpayment to treasurer to be re- 
funded 27.40 

343,488.69 

Payments to treasurer 325,151.50 

Abatements 54.06 

Transfer to tax titles: 

Reported 3913.35 

Not reported 583.81 

1,497.16 

Refund of interest charged to taxes 5.56 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list 15,051.87 

Due from collector December 31, 1933 

and January 6, 1934 1,728.54 

343,488.69 



TAXES— 1933 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Commitment per warrant 359,510.59 

Additional commitments 124.30 



70 



Overpayments to collector, refunded. . . . $162.46 

$59,797.35 

Payments to treasurer §26,639.06 

Abatements 233.53 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 32,924.76 

$59,797.35 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 $32,924.76 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 6, 

1934 ' $355.84 

Outstanding January 6, 1934, per list. . . 32,506.75 
Cash on hand January 6, 1934, verified. 62.17 

$32,924.76 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit $98.00 

Duplicate payments by State, refunded. 12.00 

Refund by State on taxes not committed 2.00 

Payments to tieasurer: 

By collector $3.00 

By State 18.00 

$21.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list 91.00 



$112.00 



$112.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1932 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit $263.00 



71 



Payments to treasurer: 

By State $6.00 

By collector 15.00 

321.00 
Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list 152.00 

Due from collector December 31, 1933, 

and January 6, 1934 90.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1933 
James L. McGrath, Collector 

Commitment per warrant $703.00 

Additional commitment 3.00 

Payments to treasurer #575.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 131.00 



£263.00 



$706.00 
$706.00 



Outstanding January 1, 1934 $131.00 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 6, 

1934 $1.00 

Outstanding January 6, 1934, per list. . . 129.00 

Cash on hand January 6, 1934, verified. 1.00 

$131.00 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1929 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per previous audit. . . $• .28 

Payments to treasurer 1933 $ .28 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 193C 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 
Outstanding January 1, 1933, per previous audit. . . $89.45 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, and January 6, 

1934, per list $89.45 

72 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit ^378.46 

Abatement after payment, refunded. ... 1.02 

3379.48 

Payments to treasurer $ .20 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list 311.75 

Due from collector December 31, 1933, 

and January 6, 1934, per list 67.53 

$379.48 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit $1,614.86 

Payments to treasurer $357.12 

Abatements 1.69 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, per list 998.32 

Due from collector December 31, 1933, 

and January 6, 1934 257.73 

$1,614.86 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1933 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Commitment per warrants . $3,252.33 

Abatements after payment, refunded. . . 57.63 
Overpayment to treasurer, to be ad- 
justed .15 

$3,310.11 

73 



Payments to treasurer $2,490.96 

Abatements 143.94 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 675.21 

33,310.11 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 . ?675.21 

Abatement after payment, to be re- 
funded .73 

£675.94 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 6, 

1934 ?220.02 

Abatements January 1 to 6, 1934 .73 

Outstanding January 6, 1934, per list. . . 451.19 

Cash on band January 6, 1934, verified. 4.00 

?675.94 



INTEREST AND COSTS ON TAXES 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Collections 1933: 
Interest: 

Taxes 1930 ?176.07 

Taxes 1931 1,418.09 

Taxes 1932 1,066.02 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 1932. . . . 15.47 

Costs not entered on cash books 67.33 

?2,742.98 

Payments to treasurer 1933 . . $2,677.7% 

Due from collector December 31, 1933, 

and January 6, 1934, per list 65.20 

£2,742.98 

INTEREST ON TAXES 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Collections 1933: 
Taxes 1933 ?15.06 

74 



Motor vehicle excise taxes 1933 $ .46 

£15.52 
Payments to treasurer . 215.52 



Collections January 1 to 6, 1934: 

Taxes 1933 £4.39 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 1933 3.43 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 6, 

1934 §7.79 

Cash on hand January 6, 1934, verified . .03 



TOWN CLERK 

Dog Licenses 

Licenses issued 1933: 

Males 130 at £2.00 £260.00 

Spayed females . 18 at 2.00 36.00 

Females 14 at 5.00 70.00 

2366.00 

Overpayment to treasurer, to be re- 
funded 6.60 

Payments to town treasurer 3338.40 

Fees retained, 162 at 20 cents 32.40 

Cash on hand December 31, 1933, and 

January 6, 1934, verified 1.80 



Hunting and Fishing Licenses 

Licenses issued 1933: 

Resident citizens' fishing 43 at £2.00 $86.00 

Resident citizens' hunting 66 at 2.00 132.00 

Resident citizens' sporting 41 at 3.25 133.25 

Minor fishing 25 at 1.25 31.25 



£7.82 



37.82 



£372.60 



£372.60 



75 



Resident citizens' trap- 
ping 1 at 35.25 ?5.25 

Minor trapping 4 at 2.25 9.00 

Non-resident citizen's 

hunting 1 at 10.25 10.25 

Payments to Division of Fisheries and 

Game £347.75 

Fees retained, 181 at 25 cents. . . .< 45.25 

Cash on hand December 31, 1933 14.00 



3407.00 



3407.00 



Cash on hand January 1, 1934. .. .' 314.00 

Licenses issued January 1 to 6, 1934: 

President citizens' fishing 2 at 32.00 34.00 

Resident citizens' hunting 1 at 2.00 2.00 

Resident citizens' sporting 8 at 3.25 26.00 

Fees retained January 1 to 

6, 1934, 11 at 25 cents 32.75 

Cash on hand January 6, 1934, verified. 43.25 



346.00 



346.00 



SELECTMEN'S LICENSES AND PERMITS 

Licenses issued 1933: 

Beer.. 3800.00 

Gasoline 7.00 

Peddler 20.00 

Pool 4.00 

Junk 36.00 

Slaughter 2.00 

Common victualler ._.' LOO 

Denatured alcohol 2.00 

Alcoholic beverages 813.86 

Auto dealer 5.00 

31,690.86 

Payments to treasurer 31,690.86 

76 



TOWN HALL RENTALS 

Outstanding January 1, J 933, per pre- 
vious audit $36.00 

Charges 574.00 

£610.00 

Payments to treasurer $342 00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 268.00 

$610.00 

Outstanding January 1, 1934 $268.00 

Charges January 1 to 6, 1934 21.00 

$289.00 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 6 

1934 $21.00 

Outstanding January 6, 1934, per list. . . 268.00 

$289.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Cash on hand January 1, 1933, per pre- 
vious audit $ .06 

Charges: 

Sealing $61.74 

Adjusting 1.70 

63.44 

$63.50 

Payments to treasurer $61.80 

Charges for adjusting retained 1.70 

$63.50 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per previous audit. . . $5.43 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, per list $5.43 



77 



PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, per pre 

vious audit 3215.57 

Charges 635.76 

Payments to treasurer 3703.76 

Abatements 40.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1933, per list: 

Welfare 330.00 

Health 77.57 

107.57 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Accounts Receivable 



3851.33 



3851.33 



Charges 1933 




360.00 


Payments to treasurer 1.933 




360.00 


LIBRARY 






Cash on hand January 1, 1933, per pre- 






vious audit 


3 .41 




Fines 


43.96 








344.37 


Payments to treasurer 


342.26 




Cash on hand December 31, 1933 


2.11 


344.37 


Cash on hand January 1, 1934 


32.11 




Fines January 1 to 16, 1934 


3.85 


35.96 


Cash on hand January 16, 1934, verified . . 




35.96 



78 



WATER RATES 

Cash on hand January 1 , 1933, 

per previous audit $397.45 

Outstanding January 1, 1933, 

per previous audit 1,127.87 

Cash variation January 1, 

1933, per previous audit . . 3.73 

$1,529.05 

Commitments 1933 6,444.76 

Charges not committed 8.70 

$7,982.51 

Payments to treasurer $6,163.09 

Abatements not reported 253.30 

Outstanding December 31, 1933 1,566.12 

$7,982.51 



Outstanding January 1, 1934 $1,566.12 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to 6, 

1934 $96.C0 

Outstanding January 6, 1934, per list. . . 1,380.68 

Cash on hand January 6, 1934, verified. 80.19 

Cash variation January 6, 1934 9.25 

$1,566.12 



HATFIELD LIBRARY FUND 

Savings Securities 

Deposits Par Value Total 
On hand at beginning of 

year 1933 $92.95 $1,400.00 $1 ,492.95 

On hand at end of year 1933 $215.16 $1,400.00 $1,615.16 

Receipts Payments 

Income $122.21 Added to savings deposits $122.21 

79 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Savings Deposits 
In Custody In Custody 

of State of Town Securities 
Treasurer Treasurer Par Value Total 
On hand at be- 
ginning of year 

1933 ' . $300.00 $5,969.07 $500.00 $7,769.07 

On hand at end of 

year 1933 $300.00 $7,205.39 $500.00 $8,005.39 

Receipts Payments 

Bequests $200.00 Added to savings deposits $236.32 

Income 277.21 Transfer to town 240.89 

$477.21 $477.21 



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83 



ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 

For the Tear Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

x 934 




GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

1935 



Selectmen's Warrant 

FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, 
FEBRUARY 18, 1935 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, Constable of the Town of Hatfield in 
said County. Greetings 

In the name of the Commonwealth you- are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 18th day of 
February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles. 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year. Moderator. Town Clerk. One Select- 
man for one year. One Assessor for three years. One 
member of the Board of Water Commissioners for three 
years. One member of the Library Committee for three 
years. One member of the School Committee for three 
years. Town Treasurer. Tree Warden. Tax Collector. 
Elector under the Will of Oliver Smith. Two Constables. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and kept open for at least four hours, and for such longer 
time as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but 
in no case will they be kept open after the hour of eight 
o'clock in the evening. 

Article 2. To hear and discuss all reports or subjects 
which have to do with the welfare of the town and or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 3. To receive and pass on town accounts. 



Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the amounts received from the Dog Fund to the Library 
account. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to accept 
donations and contributions, any such received to be 
credited to the various departments for which they are 
given. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
from the Library Fund the accumulations of interest for 
the use of the library or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the town treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1935, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by post- 
ing attested copies thereof in five public places in said 
town seven days before time of said meeting. 

Hereof, fail not and make due returns of this War- 
rant with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the 
time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 5th day of February in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred thirty- 
five. 

JOSEPH V. PORADA, 
JOHN W. MULLINS, 
ALEXANDER T. ROGALEWSKI, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Report of the Finance Committee 



We the Finance Committee wish to submit the following 
report : 

Be it recommended that you raise and appropriate 

the following amounts for the conduct and operation of 
your town business for the ensuing year. 

Highways, sewers, side- walks, bridges, etc., $2,000.00 

Highways, Chapter 81, 5,750.00 

Bonds, Town Officers, 140.00 

Inspection, animals, barns, meats, etc., 240.00 

Tree work, 300.00 

Moth work, 150.00 

Fire Department, 800.00 

Insurance, 3,109.60 

Public Welfare and equipment, 5,000.00 

Interest, for temp, loans and town hall note, 1,576.00 

Salaries and expenses, Town Officers : 





Salaries 


Exp. 


Moderator, 


$20.00 




Selectmen, 


240.00 


$100.00 


Clerk, Board Selectmen, 


80.00 




Town Clerk, 


400.00 


90.00 


Town Accountant, 


640.00 


20.00 


Town Treasurer, 


480.00 


50.00 


Assessors, 


680.00 


35.00 


Tax Collector, 


500.00 


100.00 


Sealer Wts. and Measures,, 


120.00 


50.00 


Election and Registration, 


120.00 





$3,280.00 $445.00 



ERA, 


$4,000.00 


Schools, 


43,500.00 


Tuition Hatfield Students at Smith's School, 


1,050.00 


School Physicians, 


160.00 


Care of Cemeteries, 


100.00 


Public Library, 


960.00 


Memorial Day, 


100.00 


Police Dept. and Equipment, 


2,000.00 


Reserve Fund, 


500.00 


Unclassified, 


200.00 


Attorney's Fees, 


200.00 


Care of Town Hall, 


2,000.00 


Soldiers' Relief, 


200.00 


Water Dept., 


1,000.00 


Previous Assessor Bill, 






$78,844.10 



We recommend that the following sum be ap- 
propriated from the available water surplus, 

Town Hall Note and Interest, $5,617.60 



We recommend that the following sum be ap- 
propriated from machinery fund for 

Machinery Account, 



$1,000.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. H. RICHARDS, 
FRANK A. KEMPISTY, 
J. C. RYAN, 

Finance Committee. 



ADDITIONAL REPORT 

We, your Finance Committee wish to submit this ad- 
ditional report ; in regard to the street lights which will be 
taken up under Article 2 of the Warrant. 

In the year 1932 the town paid $4,693.00 for street 
light service, this sum represents about $1.70 of your tax 
rate per thousand of valuation. It does not appear that 
the financial situation has improved any over the years 
1933 and 1934 to the extent of adding street lights to our 
budget. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. H. RICHARDS, 
FRANK A. KEMPISTY, 
J. C. RYAN, 

Finance Committee. 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Hatfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith the report of your Town Account- 
ant for the year ending December 31, 1934. 

RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUT 

Tax Levies — Previous years, $36,275.60 

Previous year, Old Age Assistance, 146.00 
Current year, M. V. Excise, 2,360.76 

Current year, Poll, 1,004.00 

Current year, Personal and Real, 33,263.65 





$73,050.01 


From the Commonwealth : 




Income Taxes, 


$3,768.95 


Corporation, 


1,109.80 


Bank and Trust Co., 


11.75 


Saving Bank Life Insurance, 


_^-34.00 


Mass. School Fund, 


13,056.02 


Union Superintendent, 


930.01 


Vocational, 
George Reed Fund, 


2,255.0(^^7-^?! % 
^58^23 i t3 ^ / 


Smith Hughes Fund, 


289.98 


F. E. R. A., 


71.10 


School F. E. R. A., 


20.00 


Miscellaneous, 


3.86 




$21,578.70 






License Fees and Permits: 






Pool, 


$4.00 




Peddler and Junk, 


52.00 




Gasoline and etc., 


13.00 




Malt Beverages, 


100.00 




Alcoholic Beverages, 


2,211.50 


$2,380.50 



Fines and Forfeits : 

District Court and County Jail 

Fines, $119.0.0 



Highways : 




Sale of Materials, 


$3.00 


Road Machinery Earnings, 


1,460.55 


Chapter 81, 


6,900.00 


Miscellaneous, 


35.50 



$119.00 



Dog Taxes from Town and County Treas. : 
Town, $246.00 

County, 294.02 

— $540.02 

Northampton Water Dept. in lieu of 

Taxes Reservoir land, $44.97 

Fire Department : 

Receipts from Card Games, $37.93 



DEPARTMENTAL 

Town Hall Rent, $345.00 

Sealer's Fees, 65.48 

Health, Hospital Bills, 47.14 

$457.62 



$8,399.05 



10 



Charities : 

Delivery of Coal, 
Sale of Wood, 
From State, 


$168.50 

70.50 

213.23 




<p c ±fj&.£utj 


Schools : 

State, Tuition State Wards, 


$57.58 


Library : 
Fines, 


$37.11 


Water Department : 

Collection Water Rents, 1932 

and 1933, 
Collection Water Rents, 1934, 


1,227.79 
4,389.77 

<zk fii7 *;fi 




tp«J,v>JL 1 .0\J 


Interest : 
Taxes, 


$2,440.41 


Municipal Indebtness : 
Temporary Loans, 


$35,000.00 


Agency Trust and Investment : 
P. C. New Accounts, 
Interest on P. C. Funds, 
Interest on Library Fund, 


$250.00 

282.61 

20.00 




tpOOtLj.XJ -L 


Woman's Relief Project : 

C. W. A. Funds, 
Teachers Contributions, 
Tax Title Redemptions, 


$958.45 
4,812.22 
3.050.31 


Total Receipts, 

Balance on Hand, January 1, 


$159,586.28 
1934, 9,407.07 


Total, 


$168,993.35 





11 








PAYMENTS 






GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




Selectmen : 








Salary, 
Expenses, 




$240.00 
93.94 


$333.94 








Clerk of Board of Selectmen : 






Salary, 






$80.00 


Moderator : 








Salary, 






$20.00 


Town Treasurer : 








Salary, 
Expense, 




$480.00 
150.30 


$630.30 








Tax Collector: 








Salary, 




$425.00 





Postage, Printing and Advertising, 108.01 

$533.01 

Assessors : 

Salaries, $680.00 

Expense, 48.83 

$728.83 

Attorney's Fees, $136.68 

Town Clerk: 

Salary, $399.96 

Expense, 80.76 

$480.72 



12 



Election and Registration : 




Salaries, 


$125.75 


Ballots, 


14.25 


Town Accountant: 




Salary, 


$640.00 


Expense, 


18.34 


Dog License Fees: 




Paid to County Treasurer by 




Town Treasurer, 




Town Hall Maintenance: 




Janitor, Salary, 


$731.32 


Coal, 1934 Bill, 


573.99 


Light and Power, 


245.49 


Janitor Supplies, 


99.12 


Repairs, 


172.65 


Miscellaneous, 


2.00 



$140.00 



$658.34 



$254.40 



$1,824.57 



Total General Government, $5,820.80 

PROTECTION, PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police : 




Salary for 1934, 


$1,499.94 


Postage, 


5.88 


Officers, 


35.60 


Telephone, 


33.00 


Garage Rent, 


59.00 


Gas and Oil, 


126.62 


Equipment and Repairs, 


257.72 


Supplies, 


6.40 



$2,024.16 



13 



Fire: 






Salary of Chief, 


$60.00 




Firemen, 


357.65 




Rent, 


65.00 




Equipment and Repairs, 


129.59 




Hose; 


174.90 




Supplies, 


59.38 




Fuel and Light, 


24.45 




Telephone, 


26.13 




Gas and Oil, 


32.47 


$929.57 






Sealer of Weights and Measures : 






Salary, 


$120.00 




Expense, 


50.00 


$170.00 






Forestry and Moth Work : 






Tree, Salary and Wages, 


$384.61 




Equipment, 


50.64 




Supplies, 


61.00 




Moth Work: 






Salaries and Wages, 


$123.48 




Supplies, 


26.52 


$646.25 







Total for Protection, $3,769.98 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Inspection : 




Schools, 


$160.00 


Animals, Meat and Barns, 


191.10 


Expense, 


48.90 



$400.00 



14 



Highways : 
General : 

Salary and Wages, 

Truck and Teams, 

Tar, Stone and Gravel, 

Equipment and Repairs, 

Lumber, 

Miscellaneous, 

Culverts, 

Snow and Ice Removal, 

Signal Light (Lighting), 

Gas and Oil, 

Advertising, 



$693.08 
8.75 

22.77 

377.70 

52.61 

60.17 

1,745.07 

12.00 

342.79 

7.61 



Highway Machinery Account : 




New Chevorlet Truck, 


$450.00 


Adams Road Scraper, 


581.38 


Repairs, 


477.57 


Highways : 




Chapter 81 : 




Salary and Wages, 


$3,651.91 


Tar, 


4,431.32 


Stone, 


164.88 


Gravel, 


600.10 


Trucks, 


3,503.03 


Culverts, 


298.76 



$1,745.07 



$1,508.95 



$12,650.00 



WELFARE 

Groceries and Provisions, $919.66 

Other Towns and Cities, Cash, 174.89 

Town Relief, Cash, 2,015.79 

Traveling Expenses, 203.84 



15 



Coal and Wood, 


181.58 


Board and Care, 


937.93 


State Institutions, 


484.00 


Mother's Aid, Other Towns, 


40.00 


Old Age Relief, 


1,104.41 


Medical Aid and Care, 


454.93 


Wages, 


100.00 


Rent, 


73.50 


Telephone, 


54.63 


Miscellaneous, 


23.64 


Tools and Equipment, 


168.50 


Repairs, Gas and Oil, 


1.25 


SOLDIER'S RELIEF 


Other Towns, 


$182.21 


State, 


15.20 


SCHOOLS 




General Expenses: 




School Committee Salaries, 1934, 


$150.00 


District Superintendent, 


1,440.00 


Enforcement Officer, 


250.00 


Stationery and Postage, 


12.58 


Telephone, 


120.51 


Traveling Expenses, 


193.54 


Census, 


25.00 


Nurse, 


799.98 


Teacher's Salaries : 




High, 


$9,672.56 


Elementary, 


16,791.36 


Substitutes, 


252.00 


Vocational and Agricultural, 


353.60 



$7,011.25 



$197.41 



$2,991.61 



l%4* 



y 



16 

Teacher's Contributions, 4,812.22 

Music, 576.35 



Text Books and Supplies : 




tpo^f^oo.w 


High, Books, 


$234.18 




High, Supplies, 


212.86 




Elm, Books, 


631.77 




Elm, Supplies, 


515.14 




Commercial, Books and Supplies, 


116.88 




Commercial, Equipment, 


370.00 


$2,280.83 






Transportation, 




$1,701.05 


Vocational : 






Transportation, 


$10.00 




Agricultural Supplies, 


182.18 




Agricultural Books, 


17.60 




Tools, 


41.56 


$251.34 


Janitors : 




High, 


$600.00 




Elementary, 


1,809.99 


$2,409.99 






Fuel and Light : 






High, 


$934.66 




Elm, 


2,329.57 


$2 9(\A 9Q 



Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds : 
Janitor, Supplies, High, $20.39 

Janitor, Supplies, Elm, 217.04 

Repairs, Elm, 1,187.37 

Miscellaneous, Elm, 87.10 



Graduation Exercises and Diplomas, $55.70 
Speaker, 15.00 



$1,511.90 

$70.70 



17 



Athletics: 

High, Supplies, 

Americanization : 
Salaries, 
ERA, 



Total for Schools, 



$67.70 
20.00 



$38.40 



$87.70 



$47,065.34 



SMITH'S AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition, Hatfield Students, 

Four students attending for 
year, June, 1934, four students at- 
tending December 31, '34. 



$750.00 







LIBRARY 




Salaries : 








Librarian, 






$322.50 


Assistants, 






113.00 


Janitor, 






98.00 


Books, 






453.63 


Periodicals, 






31.70 


Bindings, 






99.01 


Fuel, 






77.50 


Light, 






10.66 


Postage, 






2.41 


Supplies, 






35.73 


Repairs, 






2.00 




INSURANCE 




Schools, 






$134.20 


Workman's Compensation, 


385.40 


Insurance on 


Library, 




170.00 


Insurance on 


Town Machinery, 


154.43 



$1,246.14 



$844.03 



18 

MEMORIAL DAY 

Band, $50.00 

Flags, 25.40 

Transportation, 15.50 



UNCLASSIFIED 




Bonds, Town Officers, 


$150.00 


Town Reports, Printing, 


113.90 


Town Reports, Delivering, 


10.78 


Care of Town Clock, 


25.00 


Miscellaneous, 


2.26 


WATER DEPARTMENT 


Salaries : 




Commissioner, 


$135.00 


Labor, 


1,479.55 


Superintendent, 


124.98 


Pipe and Fittings, 


1,246.53 


Trucks, 


44.00 


Printing and Postage, 


28.00 


Traveling Mileage, 


20.00 


Miscellaneous, 


24.85 


CEMETERIES 




Labor : 




Main Street Cemetery, 


$43.60 


Hill Cemetery, 


6.00 


W. Hatfield Cemetery, 


15.00 


N. Hatfield Cemetery, 


10.00 


Bradstreet Cemetery, 


15.00 



$90.90 



$301.94 



$3,102.91 



$89.60 



19 

INTEREST 
Temporary Loans, $726.00 

Town Hall Notes, 1,806.25 

$2,532.25 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 
Temporary Loans, $35,000.00 

Town Hall Notes, 5,000.00 

$40,000.00 

AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 
State Taxes, $4,100.00 

Audit, 418.55 

State Parks, . 28.62 

County Tax, 8,253.86 

Interest on Library Bonds (Deposit), 20.00 
Cemetery P. C, New Funds, 250.00 

Cemetery P. C, Interest, 282.61 

$13,353.64 





REFUNDS 




M. V. E. Tax, 




52.75 


Real Estate Tax, 


ERA 


1.40 






Sewing Project, 




$1,706.83 


Dike Project, 




711.35 


E. R. A. Sewer, Playground, 




Sidewalk, etc., 




3,399.78 



$54.15 



$5,817.96 

Total Payments, $148,352.31 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1934, 20,641.04 



$168,993.35 

V. H. KELLER, 

Town Accountant. 



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25 



Treasurer's Report 



John R. McGrath, Treasurer, in account with 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1934, $9,407.07 

Receipts for the year, 159,586.28 

$168,993.35 

Payments for 1934 per Warrants, $148,352.31 
Balance December 31, 1934, 20,641.04 

$168,993.35 

Balance December 31, 1934, $17,865.45 

Protest fees on returned check, 1.56 

$17,867.01 

Balance per check book, $16,603.51 

Outstanding checks December 31, 

1934, 1,263.50 

$17,867.01 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 



26 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND 
OTHER FUNDS 



Income Expense Balance 

Fund 1934 1934 1934 

Hannah W. Smith, $16.30 $4.00 $148.79 

Augusta Wells, 12.21 10.00 407.02 

Oliver Warner, 1.61 2.00 53.44 

John H. Sanderson, 3.37 4.00 111.16 

Luman M. Moore, 7.30 8.00 241.15 

P. M. Wells, 3.85 3.00 128.17 

Benjamin Waite, 2.75 2.00 92.13 

Abby Dickinson, 3.14 3.50 103.85 

Silas G. Hubbard, 8.98 4.00 302.12 

Levi Graves, 5.33 4.00 178.23 

Lucy L. Morton, 10.79 4.00 363.83 

Charles Smith, 3.53 4.00 116.59 

Lemuel B. Field, 3.51 4.00 115.78 

Rufus H. Cowles, 3.57 4.00 117.98 

Charles E. Hubbard, 3.75 4.00 124.70 

Alpheus Cowles, 3.43 4.00 112.86 

James Porter, 3.31 3.31 109.51 

Daniel W. Allis, 4.59 5.00 151.65 

J. H. Howard, 3.27 4.00 108.22 

Fannie M. Burke, 3.33 3.33 110.82 

Charles S. Shattuck, 3.33 3.33 110.63 

Seth W. Kingsley, 3.31 3.31 109.45 

E. S. Warner, 5.84 8.00 206.31 

Reuben Belden, 3.02 3.02 100.00 

Theodore Porter, 3.20 3.20 106.18 

Charles L. Graves, 3.20 3.20 106.22 

Roswell Hubbard, 3.17 4.00 104.40 

Cooley D. Dickinson, 3.97 5.00 130.70 

Elijah Bardwell, 12.65 4.00 427.4.4 

Joseph D. Billings, 3.15 4.00 103.79 



27 



Edward C. Billings, 
Augusta Beals, 
Anthony Douglas, 
J. E. Porter, 
Jonathan Graves, 
Hugh McLeod, 
B. M. Warner, 
Chester Hastings, 
Lucius & Stearns Curtis, 
Frary & Gardner, 
Henry C. Batchellor, 
T. F. Knight & Jno Porter, 
H. W. Carl, 

Scott & Herman Harris, 
Thaddeus & Solomon Graves, 
Perpetual Care Funds Received, 
Paid Out Care of Lots, 
Hatfield Library Fund, Inter- 
est on Mortgage, 
J. D. Brown, 
Mary E. Hubbard, 



28.70 


22.50 


635.26 


3.23 


3.23 


107.29 


2.00 


4.00 


55.24 


3.11 


4.00 


102.35 


3.15 


3.50 


104.47 


3.13 


4.00 


102.83 


6.86 


4.00 


230.10 


3.11 


3.50 


102.83 


8.52 


38.00 


252.68 


3.03 


3.00 


100.54 


3.05 


3.05 


101.26 


12.31 


8,00 


411.82 


3.03 


2.00 


101.66 


4.49 


4.49 


200.00 


6.08 


6.00 


201.83 
254.70 
245.61 


26.68 




241.84 


3.02 


3.02 


100.00 


2.62 


2.62 


100.00 



Samuel H. Field, 
Lewis S. Dyer, 



NEW ACCOUNTS 

1.50 
1.00 



1.50 



150.00 
101.00 



J. R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 



28 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed buildings, 


$1,472,825.00 


Value of assessed land, 


929,540.00 


Value of assessed real estate, 


2,402,365.00 


Value of assessed personal estate, 


188,722.00 


Value of assessed real and personal estate, 


2,591,087.00 


Rate of tax per $1,000.00, 


23.30 


Number of polls assessed, 


713 


Number of horses assessed, 


245 


Number of cows assessed, 


244 


Number of neat cattle assessed, 


77 


Number of sheep assessed, 


375 


Number of fowl assessed, 


850 


Number of dwelling houses assessed, 


467 


Number of automobiles assessed, 


595 


Acres of land assessed, 


8,943 


Town appropriation, 


$86,430.50 


State tax, 


4,100.00 


State audit tax, 


418.55 


State parks tax, 


28.62 


County tax, 


8,253.86 


Overlayings, 


2,516JZ- 




^V0/° 


ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 




Income tax, 


$14,289.59 


Corporation tax, 


1,576.79 


Bank tax, 


19.70 


Excise tax, 


2,490.00 


Licenses, 


700.00 


Fines, 


200.00 



I j plfa $ 



29 

Schools, 8,000.00 

Grants State Relief, 71.10 

General Government 200.00 

Available Funds, 10,088.50 

All others, 2,317.00 

VALUE OF PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Under Chap. 59, General Laws 

Church Property, $68,000.00 

Town Property, 362,555.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery, 3,500.00 

Smith Academy, 30,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
JOHNE. RAFFA, 
JOSEPH D. DONNIS. 













2 * 



,f¥a jL», ***-^ 



w 

J 9-+ 



30 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS, 1934 
BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Male 


Female 


1 








2 


1 





5 


3 


1 


1 


1 





2 





2 


1 


2 


2 


1 








2 


2 






Total, 



18 



BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 



United States, 
Poland, 

Czecho-Slovaka, 
Germany, 



Total, 



28 



11 



22 


26 


5 


1 





1 


1 


1 



29 



BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


193; 


35 


40 


28 


31 


37 



31 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS— 1934 



January, 


1 


First marriage of both, 


30 


February, 


2 


Second of Groom, 




4 


March, 





Second of Bride, 




3 


April, 


1 


Youngest Groom, 




21 


May, 


5 


Oldest Groom, 




56 


June, 


6 


Youngest Bride, 




18 


July, 


4 


Oldest Bride, 




46 


August, 


4 


Birthplace 


Groom 


Bride 


September, 


1 


United States, 


30 


30 


October, 


5 


Poland, 


4 


3 


November, 


3 


Ireland, 





1 


December, 


1 


Nova Scotia, 


1 


1 



Total, 



33 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



1934 



Zukowski, Mary B. 
Wentworth, George M. 
Darr, Harriett D. 
Smith, Joseph 
Lemire, Mary D. 
Kostek, John 
Fahey, John 
Merrick, John P. 
Filipek, Kazimierz 
Boyle, Patrick T. 
Powers, John T. 
Raffa, Aniela K. 
Gogol, Katarzina 
Kingsley, George D. 



Wells, Jennie S. 

Walsh, John J. 

Niechaj, John 

Higgins, Michael 

Saffer, George 

Kacinski, Anthony 

Howard, Fred G. 

Fitzgerald, Mary A. 

Fitzgibbon, John T. 

Keller, Mary E. 

Jandzinski, Amelia 
*Dyer, Edward H. 
*Dyer, Mary E. 
*Kingsley, Edward P. 



* Former residents brought here for burial. 



32 

DOGS LICENSED 

1934 

98 Males at $2.00 each, $196.00 

10 Females at $5.00 each, 50.00 

12 Females spayed at $2.00 each, 24.00 



$270.00 
Less 120 fees at 20 cents each, 24.00 



$246.00 
Paid to Town Treasurer, $246.00 



V. H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 



33 



Librarian's Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library : 

I herewith present my fourth annual report as libra- 
rian. 

I regret that the registration, and that the circula- 
tion have been less than the past two years but about the 
same as in 1931. 

1931 1932 1933 1934 

15,270 20,412 19,642 15,274 

In trying to account for this loss I find the enrollment 
of the elementary schools smaller, fewer tobacco shops 
operating, causing many of the younger people to be em- 
ployed eleswhere, and no branch Library in Bradstreet. 

Mrs. Stanley Kacinski, the branch librarian felt she 
was no longer able to care for the books and I was unable 
to find anyone to take her place. 

Miss Carrie Cutter who has had charge of the books 
in West Hatfield, also, feels the work is two much of a 
burden, and unless we can find some one to assume this 
responsibility, West Hatfield will have no branch library. 

I shall miss their helpful cooperation. 

I asked Miss E. Louise Jones of the Division of Public 
Libraries for the rating of our library and she reported 
as follows : 

Our income is 53% per capita (standard $1.00) ; 
we spend 39% for books (standard 25%) ; 38% for sala- 
ries (standard 50%) ; 28% of population is registered 
(standard 50%) ; we have a circulation of 8 per capita 
(standard 10). 



34 

We are open 6 hours (standard IS hrs.) : 9 r ^ of non- 
fiction is circulated (standard 20 c c). 

Cost of service 6 cents (standard 10 cents). 

She suggests that the hours open should be extended 
and our circulation would certainly come up to 10, though 
S is very good. 

The teachers have been very helpful with suggestions 
and I try to work with them at all times. Many of them 
always have loans of books in their school rooms. 

Respectfully submitted. 

MARGARET A. MULLANY,, 

Librarian. 



35 

Tax Collector's Report 



TAXES, 1934 

Commitment per Warrant, $61,795.02 

Additional Commitment, 4.00 

Abatement after payment, refunded, 1.40 

Re-assessment per Warrant, 1.40 

$61,801.82 

Payments to Treasurer, $34,267:65 

Abatements, 336.71 

Outstanding December 31, 1934, 27,197.46 

$61,801.82 

Outstanding Jan. 1, 1935, $27,197.46 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 

to January 2, 1935, $327.26 

Outstanding January 2, 1935, per 

list, 26,870.20 

$27,197.46 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES, 1934 

Commitment per Warrants, $3,368.65 

Abatements after payment, Refunded, 41.69 
To be Refunded, 1.85 

$3,412.19 

Payments to Treasurer, $2,360.76 

Abatements, 130.54 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 and 

January 2, 1935, per list, 920.89 

$3,412.19 

JAMES L. McGRATH, 

Tax Collector. 



36 

Police Report 



Hatfield, Mass.. 

December 31. 1934. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The report of the Police Department for the year 
ending December 31. 1934 is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

Total number of arrests in the Town of Hatfield, 96 

Automobile Violations, 2S 

Breaking and Entering, 3 

Assault and Battery, 2 

Assault with Dangerous Weapon, 1 

Larceny, 2 

Fish and Game, 4 

Committed to State Farm, 2 

Committed to Tewksbury. 3 

Labor La rs, 16 

Vagrancy, 2 

Neglect of Wife, 1 

Concealed Weapons. 1 

Adultery, 2 

Having a Bomb in 1 36 ; e ; -ion, 1 

Intering Funeral Procession, 1 

Hawking and Peddling, 1 

Z isturbing 7t? ae, 2 



96 



Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



37 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE BOARD OF 
SELECTMEN FOR 1935 



Raymond Balise 
Luther A. Belden 
Frank L. Betsold 
Alex Bokina 
Alfred E. Breor 
William E. Boyle 
William R. Cutter 
William P. Connelly 
Lawrence A. Doppman 
Stanley Filipek 
John Fusek 
David Fitzgerald 
Ercent Godin 
Harry E. Graves 
Michale Hayes 
James W. Kiley 
Lawrence Kabot 
Frank A. Kempesti 
Thomas Mullaney 
David Mullaney 
Charles Pfieffer 
Joseph Pelc 
Thomas Shea 
Alex T. Rogalewski 
Adolph Toczko 
Leo Wilkes 
Leonard Vollinger 
Edward Zaskey 



38 

DONATIONS TO THE TOWN HALL 
COMMUNITY ROOMS 

Donations by the Women's Monday Night Card Group 
Electric Stove 
Christmas Tree Trimmings 
Coffe-pot and cooking utensils 
Spoons — 6 dozen 
Drinking Glasses 
China 
Cupboards 
Six trays 

Floor covering for kitchen 
Carving knives 
Glass curtains 
Over-drapes and fixtures 
Dressing room mirror 
Chair seats and table rug 
Playing cards 

Total cost of above, $285.00 

Donated by the Girls 0. J. S. 

Floor lamp, 5.00 

Installed by the Holy Trinity Society in the kitchen, in 
lieu of rent. 

2 Gas stoves 

1 — 3 Plate burner 



39 



REPORT OF 

Civil Works Administration 

IN THE TOWN OF HATFIELD 



Started November 29, 1933 and ended March 31, 1934 



Name of project CWA spent 

and description for labor 

No. 820, Dike, East Division : 
Started Nov. 29, 1933 
Finished Feb. 15, 1934 
Employed 35-40 men and 

15 teams, $9,203.55 

No. 6242-1 6242-1A : 
Sewer on Elm Street 
750 feet long- 
Started March 1, 1934 
Finished March 31, 1934 
Employed 25-30 men, 1,440.00 

No. 6242-2: 

Painting Town Hall : 

Inside and out 

Started March 1, 1934 

Ended March 31, 1934 

Employed 2 painters, 203.40 



Town spent 
for material 

and 
equipment 



$1,050.00 



235.50 



113.30 



40 

No. 6242-4: 

Painting 5 schools 

Inside and out 

Started March 1, 1934 

Ended March 31, 1934 

Employed 6-8 painters, 493.20 546.00 

No. W456: 

Women's Division 
Sewing for Needy 

of Hatfield 
Started Dec. 18, 1933 
Ended March 15, 1934 
Employed 12-14 women, 1,885.30 25.00 



Total, $13,225.45 $1,969.80 

Respectfully submitted, 
LOCAL ERA ADMINISTRATION, 
JOSEPH V. PORADA, 

Administrator. 



41 



REPORT OF 

Emergency Relief Administration 

IN THE TOWN OF HATFIELD 



Started April 1, 1934, up to December 31, 1934 



Name of project 
and description 



ERA spent 
for labor 



No. 17130 B4-1. 1A-1B-1C-1D supp. : 
Painting 5 schools 
Inside and out 
Started April 1, 1934 
Completed July 15, 1934 
Employed 6-8 painters, $1,503.10 

No. 17130 B4-2. 2A-2B-2C supp. : 
Painting Town Hall 
Inside and out 
Started April 1, 1934 
Completed July 15, 1934 
Employed 2 painters, 586.20 

No. 17130 B15-4. 4A supp. : 
Grading, loaming and 

seeding dike, No. 820 
Started July 20, 1934 
Completed Sept. 15, 1934 
Employed 15 men, 5 teams, 1,245.00 



Town spent 
for material 

and 
equipment 



CWA 



$56.15 



469.91 



42 

Xo. 17130 D1W-5. 5A-5B-5C-5D supp. : 
Women's Division sewing for 

needy of Hatfield 
Started Aug. 24, 1934 
Up to Dec. 31, 1934, 

ERA Material 
Employed 9 

women, $544.60 1,934.40 50.00 

No. 17130 B7-6 : 
New storm sewer 
Elm Street, also installed 

4 catch basins 
Started Sept. 14, 1934 
Completed Oct. 11, 1934 
Employed 18-20 men, 925.00 337.50 

No. 17130 B15-7: 

Trimming trees on Hatfield 

Streets 
Started Sept. 21, 1934 
Finished Nov. 2, 1934 
Employed 6-8 men, 605.00 

No. 17130 B7-8 : 

New surface sewer, Main 

Street 
From street to Conn, river 
Started Oct. 13, 1934 
Finished Nov. 15, 1934 
Employed 25 men, 1,175.00 540.50 

Xo. 17130 Bll-9: 

Building new playground 

In rear of Center School 

Started Nov. 9, 1934 

Up to Dec. 31, 1934 

Employed 35 men, 5 teams, 3,028.50 982.75 



43 

No. 17130 B2-10 : 

Removal of tar sidewalk and 

graveling ready for concrete 
Started Dec. 4, 1934 
Up to Dec. 31, 1934 
Employed 11 men, 272.00 36.00 

No. 17130 D3-11 : 

Cutting wood for Welfare 

Started Nov. 30, 1934 

Up to Dec. 31, 1934 

Employed 7 men, 84.00 18.00 



Total ERA exp., $11,358.20 $2,490.81 

Total CWA exp., 13,225.45 1,969.80 



Grand total, $24,583.65 $4,460.61 

At the close of the year the following projects are in 
operation : 

Playgrounds, 35 men, 5 teams. 
Elm Street sidewalk, 11 men. 
Cutting wood, 7 men. 
Women sewing, 9 women. 

Respectfully submitted, 
LOCAL ERA ADMINISTRATION, 
JOSEPH V. PORADA, 

Administrator, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



School Committee 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31, 1934 



47 

School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Arthur C. Bard well, Chairman Term expires, 1935 

Harold J. Morse, Secretary Term expires, 1936 

Edward A. Breor Term expires, 1937 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

William E. Hebard, 72 Ridgewood Terrace, Northampton 
Telephone 1088 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 
A. J. Bonneville, M. D. 
R. C. Byrne, M. D. 

SCHOOL NURSE 

Marian Holmes, R. N., 82 Harrison Ave., Northampton 

Telephone 25 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur R. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 

As of October 1, 1934 

Boys 

Between 5 and 7 32 

Between 7 and 14 178 

Between 14 and 16 72 



Girls 


Tota 


46 


78 


174 


352 


71 


143 



Totals for 1934 282 291 573 

For rate of decrease 
( 1933 313 320 633 

Totals for J 1932 356 325 681 

( 1931 373 357 730 

A decrease of 21.5 per cent in the past three years. 



4S 



School Committee's Report 



Greeting to the Citizens of the Town of Hatfield : 

Your school committee submits at this time their an- 
nual report of school activities for the past year and are 
glad to report that the same high standard (of scholar- 
ship) has been maintained by both teachers and scholars 
as shown by various standardized tests that have been 
made in various classes which shows a rating well above 
the average of the State. 

At an early conference in the year the teachers by a 
generous contribution to the town made it possible to 
operate the schools on the budget allowance. This ex- 
pression of interest and cooperation on their part should 
be of special interest to all our taxpayers. The commit- 
tee wish at this time to thank the Trustees of Smith 
Academy for the use of their buildings, as well as ex- 
pense they have put into repairs the past year. Xo doubt 
few of the citizens realize what a saving is made each 
year to the town by the Smith Academy Trustees grant- 
ing the town the use of this building at a yearly rental of 
one dollar. 

During the past year the committee has been fortu- 
nate in obtaining money from the CWA and ERA for im- 
provements in all our school buildings. Through the use 
of this money it has been possible to put all the schcol 
building in first class condition and this has been sub- 
stantiated by a very favorable comment recently given 
the town by the State Inspector of Public Buildings. 

We feel all the citizens in the town are deeply in- 
terested in the progress of the new recreation field, not 
only from the standpoint of the school children but from 



49 

a real need of a community recreation center, this is pro- 
gressing to the point where completion should be made by 
early spring under the able direction of John Mullins who 
has taken special interest in overseeing this work. 

The committee wants to take this opportunity to ex- 
press our appreciation for the high standard of services 
rendered by the teachers as well as their interest and co- 
operation at all times during the year. 

ARTHUR BARDWELL, 
HAROLD MORSE, 
EDWARD A. BREOR. 



50 
SCHOOL CALENDAR AND NOTES 

Winter Term — January 2 to February 21. 
Vacation of one week for all schools. 

Spring Term — March 4 to about April 5. 

Onion planting may vary this date a few days. 

Summer Term — April 22 to June 21. 
Summer Vacation. 

Fall Term — September 9 to December 20. 

Winter Term of 1936 to begin Monday, January 6th. 

HOLIDAYS 

There will be no sessions of school on the following 
days : — 

February 22, April 19, which is also Good Friday. 
May 30 — Labor Day — October 12-pNovember 11 — 
Thanksgiving and day following. 

Schools will be in session all day before Thanksgiving 
although some portion of the afternoon may be used for 
a program suitable for the holiday. 

Unless Christmas programs are given outside of 
school hours a part of the afternoon of December 20th 
may be used for them. 

The teachers of Smith Academy will be at their rooms 
on Friday, September 6th, to register pupils, arrange 
programs, distribute textbooks and make assignments so 
that all schools and classes may start the following week 
with complete sessions. 



51 



Superintendent's Report 



To the School Committee and Citizens of Hatfield : 

Herewith is the fourth annual report since I have 
been the superintendent of your schools. In it I shall dis- 
cuss : — 

Changes which have occurred within the year, 
Present enrollments and apparent trends. 
Progressive aims for coming school years. 

During the summer there were two resignations from 
your group of teachers and in each case the teacher re- 
signed to be married. Both teachers had served satis- 
factorily several years in the particular position. As 
teacher of Latin and French in place of Miss Day the 
committee approved the appointment of Miss Jean Belden 
who had taught with success for a former principal of 
Smith Academy — Mr. Gifford, at New Salem. Miss 
Lynch was transferred from the Grammar room at North 
Hatfield to take the classroom from which Miss Donnis 
resigned. Miss Petcen was reappointed and assigned to 
the North Hatfield position. From your superintendent's 
viewpoint thus far the entire teaching force has served to- 
gether very nicely. 

It was a real source of satisfaction to have your com- 
mittee vote to restore the supervisor of penmanship as a 
part of the school program and thereby make possible for 
teaching help in two sections of Smith Academy. Miss 
Elizabeth F. Baker of Lynn, a graduate of Boston Uni- 
versity, was the appointee for this position. Miss Baker 
teaches two classes in English in the morning, also two 



52 

commercial classes, while the afternoon is given over to 
the supervision of elementary penmanship. 

The enrollment of the pupils for all the grades of the 
town at the close of the past term without assignment to 
buildings appears herewith. 

December 21, 1934 

Smith 
I II III IV V VI VII VIII Academy Total 
52 43 47 50 57 67 57 59 153 585 

A comparison with last year shows that the decrease 
is fairly general through the upper grades from which the 
larger part of Home Permits have been issued. 

December 22, 1933 

Smith 
I II III IV V VI VII VIII Academy Total 
49 43 56 63 71 62 70 47 155 616 

Some of the difference from year to year is caused 
from non-promotion but that factor is not one which can 
be forecast. 

From a glance at the vital stastics of the town clerk; 
it would seem that a continued decrease in the attendance 
in the grades can be anticipated. Whether it will result 
in a further closing of elementary rooms would seem to 
me to depend upon the location and the possibility of 
grouping the pupils to best learning advantage. It would 
seem that for September there would be no split sections 
of grades at the Center School. 

It seems a natural thing for a superintendent to men- 
tion other educational offerings which would come within 
the scope of Smith Academy and the elementary grades 
whenever conditions warrant and enough citizens want 
them bad enough to provide the appropriations. Just as 
any other superintendent, so do I begrudge the continued 



53 

absence of the Household Arts courses from the offerings 
of Smith Academy. To me the vocational classes for 
boys and girls are just as worthwhile as the traditional 
classical courses. Actually the trend of curriculum 
studies is to decrease the classical content of curricula 
and increase the so-called socialized or civic-interest 
courses. Since the first of this very month I have re- 
ceived a suggested course of study for the smaller high 
schools of the state in rural areas very similar to yours. 
The outline is a result of principals' studies right here 
within this Commonwealth and there is provision for only 
two years of ONE foreign language ! On the other hand 
there is suggested more courses dealing with social con- 
ditions and problems, and more extensive training for 
leisure time through physical education than now is pos- 
sible in Smith Academy. To be equally frank the courses 
as now offered in science, mathematics, business courses, 
music and boys' vocational offerings are adequate. Bear 
in mind that our governor in his inaugural addresss 
stressed the need of more teaching of economics in the 
school courses. 

You have now living in Hatfield a teacher thoroughly 
qualified to take over a more general supervision and in- 
struction in physical education and playground activities. 
I refer to Mr. Kalloch of the Smith Academy faculty. Of 
course it would be necessary for him to be relieved of 
some academic classes so that he would be free to super- 
vise the recess periods during the more open months of 
the year. At other seasons I assume some sort of 
schedule satisfactory to all town authorities could be ar- 
ranged for the use of the Town Hall. While it would be 
possible to include the activity program at the Center 
School easy enough, the oversight of Bradstreet and North 
Hatfield physical program would be subject to a program 
as now used by the music and penmanship supervisors. 
The elementary physical activities would be the better 
mold into the schedule for Smith Academy. 



54 

In combination with the subjects relinquished at 
Smith Academy by Mr. Kalloch it would be very feasible 
to include a half day of Household Arts. It might not be 
possible for this teacher to be a vocational trained teacher 
but rather an academic trained Household Arts teacher. 
A half loaf is better than none. 

Yes, it would mean another teacher but I am firmly 
of the opinion the outcome would be highly satisfactory to 
many voters and their pupils. If a closing of some one 
elementary classroom were possible the extra cost would 
be almost negligible. Already other departments of the 
town have appropriated money to enable the town au- 
thorities to secure federal moneys for the improvement of 
the Center School Playground which I assume will become 
the Center Recreation Field. I appreciate the motive and 
feel certain the resulting improvements will bring a rec- 
reation area the equal of any in the valley. 

Inasmuch as your superintendent believes that many 
townspeople like to know how it is likely that the round 
sum appropriated for school purposes may be apportioned 
among the many items of school expense he inserts here- 
with an estimate. For comparison the amounts for the 
similar items are shown for the last two odd years pre- 
viously. 



For Comparison 


Estimate 




1931 


1933 


1935 


General Administration : 








Committee, 


$400.00* 


$300.00* 


$150.00 


Supt. of Schools, 


1,550.03 


1,510.00 


1,475.00 


School Nurse, 


999.97 


850.00 


800.00 


Attendance Officer, 


400.00 


268.00 


250.00 


Telephone, 


161.76 


131.65 


125.00 


Printing, Postage and 








Stationery, 


116.96 


21.49 


35.00 


Traveling, Supt. and 








Voc, 


320.62 


183.18 


200.00 



55 



Census, 
Sundries, 


50.00* 
3.00 


25.00 


25.00 
5.00 




$4,002.34 


$3,289.32 


$3,065.00 


Instruction: 
High School, 
Grades, 
Substitutes, 
Extra Vocational, 
Contributions, , 


$11,709.69 $10,057.24 $12,000.00 *U 7 H 
23,416.07 19,534.52 21,040.00 

543.50 204.00 

190.00 351.60 350.00 

6,164.50 Ug)> >% 




$35,859.26 $36,311.86 $33,390.00 


Books and Supplies : 
High School Books, 

Supplies, 
Commercial, 
Grade Books, 

Supplies, i 


$427.25 
892.85 
101.67 
475.30 
867.90 


$511.45 
427.24 

478.67 
348.77 
550.01 


$300.00 3 
600.00 
400.00 / / 

400.00 £,S7.7 
500.00 .jr* r../T 




$2,764.97 


$2,316.14 


$2,200.00 


Transportation, 

Janitors : 
Academy, 
Grades, 


$1,435.95 

$600.00 
2,740.93 


$1,950.00 

$600.00 
2,038.49 


$1,850.00 

$600.00 
1,800.00 ?0? 




$3,340.93 


$2,638.49 


$2,400.00 


Household Arts, 
Maintenance, 


$308.64 


$63.37 





56 

Agriculture, Books and 

Supplies, $162.93 $150.00 



$308.63* $226.30 $150.00 2<T 



Fuel, Light and Power : 

High School, $986.75 $638.30 $800.00 



Elementary, 


3,194.54 


2,064.65 


2,400.00 


#>m 




$4,181.29 


$2,702.95 


$3,200.00 


S>£m 


Maintenance and Repairs: 

High School, $157.84 
Elementary, 662.00 


$36.60 
233.72 


$50.00 
750.00 






$819.84 


$270.32 


$800.00 


Miscellaneous, 
Americanization Work, 


$79.99 


$169.83 


$100.00 
200.00 


A . . 


Totals, 


$52,809.37 $49,875.46 $47,355.00 


ti 



* These figures are for two years. 

The total figure is arrived at — in so far as it pertains 
to salaries of the teaching force — on the contract basis in 
which there has not been any change so long as some sort 
of contributory measure remained effective. During the 
year which has just ended with variations in the rate of 
contributions there was an average rate of 16*4 P er cen t 
in operation. Hence, if $47,355.00 was to be granted for 
school purposes in 1935 and the teachers were to con- 



57 

tribute on the same rate as in 1934, then they would con- 
tribute $5,426.00 in even numbers or an actual appropria- 
tion of $42,433.00 would be necessary. Were the rate of 
contribution to be reduced to 10 per cent, then a sum con- 
tribution of $3,339.00 would permit of an appropriation 
of $44,026.00. Were the rate of contribution reduced to 
8 1/3 or 1/12 of salary, a total contribution of $2,782.00 
would bring an appropriation of $44,553.00. 

To myself it would seem that if a system of contribu- 
tion which calls for hypocritical bookkeeping is to con- 
tinue for any length of time that a plain even cross-sec- 
tion reduction would be more plainly understood and no 
more unpleasant to the individuals of the teaching force. 

From the figures given me by your town accountant 
there was paid on the school account in 1934, $47,065.34. 
I mistrust that there may be many who think that every 
penny of that amount was taken from the assessment of 
the town valuation. For this reason I shall list herewith 
the sources of some of the moneys expended for school 
purposes. For 1934 it is enlightening. 

General School Fund, Part I, $7,925.05 

Part II, 4,292.92 

Vocational Account, 3,4 



Salary and Expense of Superintendent, 930.01 v / 

Federal Funds, Vocational, 328.21 %^y 

State Ward Tuition, 57.58 I }* b * 



$16,995.16 
Contribution by Teachers, 4,812.22 



$21,807.38 



Now this sum represents 46 per cent of the total ex- 
penditures as mentioned before. 

During the school year your superintendent makes 
many visits of varying length into the classrooms about 
the town. Sometimes a teacher will stop her classes and 



58 

discuss a pressing problem of the room. More often the 
recitations, oral or written go right along. A few stand- 
ard tests have been given and the results have showed that 
the pupils of your schools are uniformly parallel with the 
published ratings for the particular tests. Frequently 
the superintendent looks over the written papers of the 
pupils to compare them with the ratings of the teachers 
on the report cards. From it all I am satisfied the pupils 
have made reasonable progress. This much we must not 
forget. There are differences in the visible expression, 
form and personal mannerisms of pupils as they gather 
in the classroom or anywhere else. May there not also be 
just as wide divergence in the unseen operations of the 
functions of the brain and body ? So in the matter of 
rating and marking there will ever be unpleasantness 
among the pupils and their parents. 

I have been grateful for the continued cooperation of 
the teaching force. I am very grateful for the interest 
which the members of the committee have taken in the 
upkeep of the buildings, and their friendliness. I thank 
any who have helped in any way for the continued support 
of the schools of Hatfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HEBARD. 



59 



Principal of Smith Academy 



To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Commit- 
tee of Hatfield : 

I hereby submit my fifth annual report as Principal 
of Smith Academy. The opening registration was 145, 
divided as follows : Seniors, 33 ; Juniors, 28 ; Sophomores, 
50 ; Freshmen, 34. The enrollment in Smith Academy at 
present is 143, with 34 in the entering class. Last year 
the opening registration was 163. 

The graduation class of 1934 numbered 23. Of this 
number 4 entered M. S. C. ; 2 entered Commercial College ; 
2 entered Training Schools for Nursing within the year. 

The school curriculum lists the following courses : 
Classical, Scientific, General, Commercial and Agricul- 
tural. These courses are functioning successfully. I 
strongly favor the return of the Household Arts Course. 
Then the curriculum would be broad, serviceable, and well 
suited to the needs and capacities of every local boy* and 
girl of high school age in our community. 

The faculty experienced several changes during the 
year. Miss Katherine M. Day, teacher of Modern Lan- 
guages for the past five years, resigned in June. During 
her term of service here, her work was marked by 
thoroughness, efficiency, and sympathetic understanding 
of pupils and their problems. Miss Jean Belden, alumna 
of this school and Vermont University was appointed 
modern language instructor and director of girls' ath- 
letics. Miss Belden brings to her new position teaching 
experience and a knowledge of athletics which augurs well 
for successful work in her department. 



60 

Miss Elizabeth Baker of Lynn, alumna of Boston 
University was appointed to the faculty on a one-half day 
basis to teach Commercial subjects and English, thereby 
relieving the heavy teaching load in these departments, 
and enabling the teachers therein, to devote more time to 
student activities namely: 1. School paper supervision; 
2. Student conferences; 3. Prize speaking; 4. Assembly 
programs, and other essential projects by which latent 
ability in execution and direction is often revealed. Miss 
Baker brings to her work practical business experience 
and is well qualified to carry on her work in the commer- 
cial department. 

I feel that the most important problem of the high 
school and the central problem of physical education is 
how to secure and conserve the health of every student. 
At the opening of school in the fall, Physical examinations 
were given to all students by School Physician Robert 
Byrne, M. D. and School Nurse, Marion D. Holmes, R. N. 
The results of these examinations were tabulated on the 
pupils life history card. In a few cases, special correc- 
tive exercises were prescribed for certain pupils. 

A successful program for team athletics for boys was 
carried out under the able leadership of Coach John R. 
Kalloch. The basebal lteam was undefeated in the north- 
ern division of the Hampshire league, but was defeated 
in the playoffs by Hopkins Academy, winners of the 
championship in the southern division of the league. 

Smith Academy was again represented on the soccer 
field by a light, but versatile team, and playing against 
some of the leading elevens in the valley, turned in a sea- 
son's record of seven victories, two ties, and three defeats. 

In basketball the team was defeated eleven times, and 
had a victory total of seven games, up to its participation 
in the Massachusetts State College small high school 
basketball tournament. Smith Academy reached the 
semi finals of the tournament by defeating Turners Falls 
on the opening night in a spirited, well-played contest. 



61 

The team was eliminated from further tourney play in 
the semi-finals by Deerfield. The spirit of the team, stu- 
dent body, and local supporters of our athletic teams has 
all helped to make the athletic achievements of the past 
year successful. 

The program for girls' athletics is gradually expand- 
ing, and a forward step was taken this year by the forma- 
tion of a Girls' Hampshire League which consists of teams 
from Hopkins Academy, Turners Falls, Deerfield, and 
Smith Academy. Games with New Salem, Greenfield 
high school, and Arms Academy round out a schedule of 
twelve games, the majority of which are played in the 
afternoon. The team enjoyed a most successful season 
last year, and from present indications last year's record 
will be equalled, if not surpassed this year. 

For the second year, report cards were issued month- 
ly to the parents. The close cooperation of parents is 
earnestly requested. Parents are invited to call on the 
principal and teachers at all times during the school year 
to learn at first hand about the progress of the students. 

I wish to thank the faculty for their helpful attitude, 
ever-generous assistance, and good will in all activities 
connected with the school. 

Finally, may I express my appreciation of the loyal 
support and cooperation of the Superintendent, members 
of the School Committee and Board of Trustees of Smith 
Academy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD J. BURKE, 

Principal. 



62 

Report of Music Supervisor 



The three classes of musicians are : the very few who 
create it, the larger number who perform it and the very 
much greater class who listens. The aim of our school 
music is not so much to stimulate the gifted as to improve 
the musical culture of the average pupil. 

We teach to develope a desire for and to cultivate a 
knowledge of music. Therefore we must give the child 
the joyful experience of hearing and sharing in the ren- 
dition of worthwhile music. 

The detailed work of the three elements of music, 
melody, rhythm and harmony is presented according to 
the grade and understanding of the pupil. We must lead 
our children to love good music and to fully appreciate 
the beauty of this art that it may become to them a com- 
mon and intimate language of self-expression. 

In the primary grades we are building a melodic and 
rhythmic basis through the medium of rote song and no- 
tation, gradually increasing in difficulty into the upper 
grades where the harmonic element of part singing is in- 
troduced. 

In September the voices of all the students in Smith 
Academy were tested. We found splendid material for 
our glee clubs and four part singing in the chorus. 

When we consider the fact that through our high 
school musical activities the student body as a whole has 
an unparalleled opportunity to show their true school 
spirit as well as an appreciation of music. I would ask 
the parents to help by considering the musical rating of 
their child. 

I sincerely thank the school committee, our superin- 
tendent, Mr. Hebard, the principals and teachers for their 
untiring efforts in the interest of music. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



63 



School Health Report 

HATFIELD, 1934 



To the Superintendent and 
Members of the School Committee : 

"Living today is a great adventure", especially to 
youth. The four great sources of human power capable 
of aiding youth toward success in this adventure are : 
Health, Ideals, Knowledge, and a Receptive mind. 

Health is more than just being well; it is being at 
one's best. 

Ideals are like the controls of a machine ; they guide 
and direct. There is much scientific knowledge today 
telling us how to live finely and well but we must present 
a receptive mind in order to contact this source of power. 
Unless we know HOW, as well as WHY, no one can live 
according to their best ideals, again, one may have ideals 
without vigorous health but without the latter they are 
rarely realized ; too many factors tend to get in the way. 

On this structure of — health, ideals, knowledge, re- 
ceptivity is based the plans for a constructive Health Edu- 
cation program. The teaching and practice of health 
ideals through physical training coordinates body and 
mind, stimulates alertness and a sense of fair play, not to 
mention the value of exercise as a health measure. The 
teaching and practice of disease prevention and general 
safety, is fundamental in health education. 

Disease prevention is based on the health examina- 
tion, and the many avenues open to the school child fo,r 
protection and cure. This source is under the control of 
the individual who is interested and ready to take ad- 
vantage of scientific knowledge. 



64 

The general health of the school children was good 
in spite of the severity of the winter, cf course the occa- 
sional case of children's diseases is sure to occur but the 
children seem to "laugh it off" without serious complica- 
tions. This is no doubt due to better understanding of 
the conditions and the child's good health. 

The Dental clinic examined all Primary and Gram- 
mar school children in the district, operating at the North 
and Center schools, the pupils from outside were brought 
to these centers. The dental examination showed marked 
improvement in Oral Hygiene, expecially at the Center 
school, to find 100 children without dental defects in a 
group of 225 is a high percentage at the age of changing 
dentition. The first grade entering in September were 
85 per cent normal, including nutrition, vision and oral- 
hygiene. 

Correction of defects during the year as follows : 

Pupils 
Dental defects by clinic services, 140 operations 281 
Dental defects by private services, 48 
Vision defects corrected or 

improved, 21 

Nose and throat corrected, 12 



221 



The Chadwick Clinic made the third visit during the 
Fall term, checking up on pupils connected with the clinc ; 
report 2 discharged, 12 improved, will be re-examined 
next year. 

One girl attended the Health Camp Hodgkins in 
August, returned home much improved, several others 
were lined up to go but the support given to the Christ- 
mas seal sale was not sufficient to care for more. Every- 
one should visit this camp some time while the camp is in 
operation and see the excellent facilities provided for the 



65 

health and comfort of the children and give this health 
project their earnest support. 

The Health Education program stated in the report 
of 1933 was completed in June, 1934. The teaching of 
practical health and safety measures as part of the school 
program was a new venture but the challenge of the need 
cannot be overlooked. The increasing rate of accidents 
is appalling and how to combat that menace is a major 
problem. It seems the logical thing to educate the chil- 
dren to protect themselves and others, if possible. This 
is being done in many ways — through classroom warning, 
advice of the Safety Council, through the press, and teach- 
ing of First Aid in the classroom. 

The honor of holding a Junior First Aid Red Cross 
certificate was given to 17 of the 19 boys under instruc- 
tion at the Center school. The class of girls in Home 
Hygiene and Child Care was more involved. The course 
including Personal, Community and Household Health 
and Sanitation, the interrelation and responsibility en- 
tailed, resp. The prevention, control and home care of 
minor infections in the home as well as of minor accidents. 
15 girls hold certificates, 20 received instruction. 

The classes for 1934-'35 include : 

40 boys and girls — Center school Junior First Aid. 

15 boys and girls — North school Junior First Aid. 

As a new objective in health and safety education — 
safety in the water as well as on land is under considera- 
tion. We hope sometime to see no child graduating from 
the grammar school without a certificate as a qualified 
swimmer, many swim now but have no knowledge how to 
save themselves in case of emergency. With this in view, 
ten girls and boys from the High school are under instruc- 
tion as Life-savers so as to protect the younger group 
while learning. Children will take to water like ducks — 
so making the exercise safe for them is a responsibility. 
The school health department is hoping to see a swimming 



66 

pool attached to the gymnasium and make swimming a 
regular part of the physical education program as well as 
a safety measure. 

The school health department sincerely appreciates 
the splendid cooperation of the classroom teachers and 
the transportation supplied for the High school group of 
the life-saving class. 

To the State Department of Health Education, the 
Metropolitan Life Ins. Co., the Prudential Life Ins. Co v 
the American Red Cross, the Hampshire County Public 
Health Association and the Westfield Sanatorium, the 
Health department of the Hatfield schools extend appre- 
ciation for many favors and helpful literature received 
during the year 1934. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN HOLMES, R. N. 



67 



School 
Smith Academy 



Center 



School Street 

Hill 

North 

Hatfield 

Bradstreet 

Health Education 
and School Nurse 
Music 
Penmanship 



TEACHER DATA 

Contract 

Teacher Residence Salary 

E. J. Burke, Holyoke $3,000.00 

John H. Kalloch, Hatfield 1,900.00 

Clarence J. Larkin, Haydenville 1,800.00 

Mary E. Ryan, Hatfield 1,600.00 

Mary M. Nolan, Hatfield 1,400.00 

Jean Belden, Hatfield 1,400.00 

Elizabeth Baker,* Lynn 1,200.00 

Harold Ford, Northampton 1,440.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Kathleen Connelly, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Mary F. Ahearn, Northampton 1,200.00 

Catherine T. Shea, Holyoke 1,150.00 

Katherine Hayes, Hatfield 1,100.00 

Vera M. Lynch, Holyoke 1,100.00 

Anna Osley, Hatfield 1,100.00 

Marie A. Proulx, Hatfield 1,150.00 

Constance Mullany, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Eleanor Whalen, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Mary D. Donelson, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Susan Petcen, Hatfield 1,050.00 

Lena Fitzgerald, Hatfield 1,200.00 

Ellen M. O'Hara, Greenfield 1,200.00 

Marian Holmes, R. N., Northampton 800.00 

Maude E. Boyle, Hatfield 675.00 
Elizabeth Baker,* Lynn One-half time and 

salary as stated above 



During the past fiscal year the full time teachers contributed 
from their salaries at the rate of 20 percent for February, March, 
April, May, June, July, August, September: 15 per cent for Oc- 
tober : 10 per cent for November and December : and received 
full day pay in January. For the entire year the rate of contri- 
bution was therefore 1614 per cent. 



68 



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69 




■HENRY F. LONG 

COMMISSIONER 



rHEODORE N. WADDELL 
DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTS 



Sije (ftammatmrealtif of Massarljuartts 

Separtmettt of Olorporatiotta nnb Sanation 

Btmaton of Arroimts 

§>tate 2|o«H^ t Unstmt 

January 24, 1935. 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. Joseph V. Porada, Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31, 1934, made in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws. This is in the 
form of a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, 
Assistant Director of Accounts. 



Very truly yours, 
Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts. 



70 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporation and Taxation 
State House, Boston 

Sir: 

As directed by you, I have made an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31, 1934, and submit the following report there- 
on: 

The records of the departments receiving money for 
the town or committing bills for collection were examined 
and checked. 

The receipts for licenses issued by the selectmen were 
checked with the records of licenses granted and the pay- 
ments to the treasurer were verified. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts 
were checked with the treasurer's records, while the pay- 
ments were compared with the selectmen's warrants and 
the treasurer's cash book. The ledger appropriation ac- 
counts were checked with the amounts voted by the town 
as listed from the town clerk's record of town meetings. 
The ledger accounts were analyzed, the necessary adjust- 
ments were made, a trial balance was taken off, and a 
balance sheet, which is appended to this report, was pre- 
pared showing the financial condition of the town on 
December 31, 1934. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked. The receipts as recorded were 
compared with the records of the several departments col- 
lecting money for the town and with the other sources 
from which money was paid into the town treasury, while 
the payments were checked with the warrants given by 



71 

the selectmen authorizing the treasurer to disburse town 
funds. The cash book additions were verified and the 
cash balance was proved by a reconciliation of the bank 
account with a statement furnished by the bank and an 
actual count of the cash on hand. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. The commitment lists of 
poll, personal, real estate, and other vehicle excise taxes 
were proved with the warrants given by the assessors 
from their collection. The recorded collections were 
checked with the treasurer's cash book, the abatements 
were compared with the assessors' record of abatements 
granted, and the outstanding accounts were listed and 
proved with the accountant's ledger. 

A verification of the outstanding accounts was made 
by mailing notices to a number of persons whose names 
appeared on the books as owing money to the town, and 
from the replies received it appears that the accounts, as 
listed, are correct. 

Since the date of the last audit of the former collec- 
tor's accounts, proof has been presented by several per- 
sons to the effect that their taxes, aggregating $61.18, had 
been paid but not credited on the books of the former col- 
lector. The present collector, to whom the taxes in ques- 
tion were recommitted for collection, was credited with 
the amount of $61.18 and the discrepancy of the former 
collector was increased correspondingly, the total amount 
on December 31, 1934 being $2,852.68. 

The town clerk's receipts for dog and sporting li- 
enses were checked with the record of licenses issued, the 
payments to the state and town treasurer's being verified 
and the cash on hand being proved by an actual count. 

The surety bonds of the town clerk, treasurer, tax 
collector ,and water department collector, were examined 
and found to be in proper form. 



72 

The automobile liability insurance policies issued to 
the town were examined, and it was noted that they in- 
clude protection against property damage. Attention in 
this connection is called to the provisions of Clause 1, Sec- 
tion 40, General Laws, which provides that premiums may 
be paid "for effecting insurance providing idemnity for or 
protection to any officer or employee of the town against 
loss by reason of his liability to pay damages to others for 
bodily injuries". 

The receipts from rents of the town hall were checked 
with the record of hall rentals and the payments to the 
treasurer were verified. 

The receipts of the sealer of weights and measures 
were checked with the record of fees charged, the pay- 
ments to the treasurer being compared with the treas- 
urer's record of receipts and the cash on hand being veri- 
fied by count. , 

The records of accounts receivable of the health, 
highway, and public welfare departments were examined. 
The charges were listed and compared with the amounts 
reported to the town accountant, the recorded collections 
and disallowances were checked, and the outstanding ac- 
counts were listed and proved with the accountant's 
ledger. 

The recorded receipts of the librarian for fines, etc., 
were checked, the payments to the treasurer were verified, 
and the cash on hand was proved by an actual count. 

The records of the water department were examined 
and checked in detail. The charges were added, the re- 
corded collections were checked with the commitment lists 
and with the treasurer's books, the abatements were com- 
pared with the departmental record of such abatements 
granted, the outstanding accounts were listed and proved 
with the accountant's ledger, and the cash on hand was 
proved by an acutal count. 



The securities and savings bank books representing 
the investment of the funds held in trust by the town were 
examined and listed. The income was proved and the ex- 
penditures were verified. 

There are appended to this report, in addition to the 
balance sheet, tables showing a reconciliation of the treas- 
urer^ cash, summaries of the tax and departmental ac- 
counts, as well as tables showing the trust fund transac- 
tions. 

While engaged in making the audit cooperation was 
received from the several town officials, for which on be- 
half of my assistants and for myself, I wish to express 
appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herman B. Dine, 

Assistant Director of Accounts. 



74 
RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 



Balance January 1, 1934, $9,407.07 

Receipts 1934, 159,586.28 

Payments 1934, $148,352.31 

Balance December 31, 1934, 20,641.04 



Balance January 1, 1935, $20,641.04 

Receipts January 1 to 2, 1935, 685.58 



$168,993.35 
$168,993.35 

$21,326.62 



Balance January 2, 1935 : 

First National Bank of 

Northampton, $16,603.51 

Cash in office, verified, 4,712.97 

$21,316.48 
Cash variation January 2, 1935, 10.14 

$21,326.62 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NORTHAMPTON 

Balance January 2, 1935, per 

statement, $17,865.45 

Protest fees on returned check, in 

transsit to bank for deposit, $1.56 

$17,867.01 

Balance January 2, 1935, per 

check book, $16,603.51 

Outstanding checks, January 2, 

1935, per list,' 1,263.50 

$17,867.01 



75 

TAXES— 1930 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $108.72 

Payments to treasurer, January 1 

to March 6, 1934, $28.23 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to 
James L. McGrath, Collecor, 80.49 

$108.72 



TAXES— 1930 
James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per 

warrant, $80.49 

Payments to treasurer, March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, $42.32 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 and 

January 2, 1935, per list, 38.17 

$80.49 



TAXES— 1931 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $476.37 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to James L. 

McGrath, Collector, $476.37 

TAXES— 1931 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per 
warrant. $476.37 



76 



Audit adjustments: 

Old Age Assistance Taxes, 1931, 

reported as Taxes, 1931, 
Tax Title redemption reported 

as Taxes, 1931, 



1.00 
6.63 



Payments to treasurer March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, $156.32 

Audit adjustment: 

Collections not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector. 



Outstanding December 31, 1934 
and January 2, 1935, per list, 



5.98 
321.70 



$484.00 



$484.00 



TAXES— 1932 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $15,051.87 

Payments to treasurer, January 1 

to March 6, 1934, $122.56 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to 

James L. McGrath, Collector, 14,929.31 



$15,051.87 



TAXES— 1932 
James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per 

warrant, 
Payments to treasurer, March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, $14,267.10 

Abatements March 6 to December 

31, 1934, 26.50 



$14,929.31 



77 

Audit adjustment: 

Collections not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 28.90 

Outstanding December 31, 1934, 606.81 

$14,929.31 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, $606.81 

Payments to treasurer, January 1 

to 2, 1935, $163.64 

Outstanding January 2, 1935, per 

list, 443.17 

$606.81 



TAXES— 1933 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $32,924.76 

Payments to treasurer, , $20,522.70 

Abatements, 22.00 

Transfer to Tax Titles, 1,070.30 

Outstanding December 31, 1934, 11,309.76 

$32,924.76 



Outstanding January 1, 1935, $11,309.76 

Payments to treasurer, January 1 

to 2, 1935, $138.38 

Outstanding January 2, 1935, per 

list, 11,171.38 

$11,309.76 



TAXES— 1934 
James L. McGrath, Collector 
Commitment per warrant, $61,795.02 



78 

Additional commitment, 4.00 

Abatment after payment, refunded, 1.40 

Re-assessment, per warrant, 1.40 

$61,801.82 
Payments to treasurer, $34,267.65 

Abatements, 336.71 

Outstanding December 31, 1934, 27,197.46 

$61,801.82 



Outstanding January 1, 1935, $27,197.46 

Payments to treasurer, January 1 

to January 2, 1935, $327.26 

Outstanding January 2, 1935, per 

list, 26,870.20 

$27,197.46 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $91.00 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to James L. 

McGrath, Collector, $91.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per warrant, $91.00 

Payments to treasurer, March 6, to 

December 31, 1934, $32.00 

Audit adjustments : 

Old age assistance taxes, 1931, 

reported as taxes, 1931, 1.00 



79 



Collection not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 1.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list, 57.00 



$91.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1932 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $152.00 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to James L. 
McGrath, Collector, $152.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1932 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per warrant, $152.00 

Payments to treasurer, March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, $47.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list, 105.00 

$152.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1933 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $131.00 

Payments to treasurer, 1934, $67.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list, 64.00 

$131.00 



SO 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1930 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1. 1934. S89.45 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to James L. 

McGrath. Collector, $89.45 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1930 
James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per 

warrant, S89.45 

Payments to teasurer March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, 817.47 

Audit adjustment: 

Collection not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 9.86 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list. 62.12 

589.45 






MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1. 1934. 8311.75 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to James L. 

McGrath. Collector. 8311.75 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

James L. McGrath. Collector 

Recommitment March 6. 1934. per 

warrant, 8311.75 



81 

Audit adjustment: 

Motor vehicle excise taxes, 1932, 

reported as 1931, 4.00 

Payments to teasurer March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, $107.85 

Audit adjustment : 

Motor vehicle excise taxes, 1931, 

reported as interest, .05 

Collection not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 6.16 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list, 201.69 



$315.75 



$315.75 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 

Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $998.32 

Recommitment March 6, 1934 to James L. 

McGrath, Collector, 998.32 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 
James L. McGrath, Collector 

Recommitment March 6, 1934, per 

warrant, $998.32 

Payments to teasurer March 6 to 

December 31, 1934, $508.55 

Audit adjustments : 

Motor vehicle excise taxes, 1932, 

reported as 1931, 4.00 



82 



Collection not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 

and January 2, 1935, per list, 



9.28 
476.49 






$998.32 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1933 
James L. McGrath, Collector 



Outstanding January 1, 1934, $675.06 

Abatements after payment, refunded, 11.06 

Payments to treasurer, $502.50 

Abatements, 13.06 
Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list, , 170.56 



$686.12 



$686.12 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1934 

James L. McGrath, Collector 

Commitment per warrants, $3,368.65 

Abatements after payment : 



Refunded, 




41.69 




To be refunded, 




1.85 


$3,412.19 


Payments to treasurer, 




$2,360.76 




Abatements, 




130.54 




Outstanding December 31, 


1934 






and January 2, 1935, per list, 


920.89 










$3,412.19 



83 

INTEREST ON TAXES 
Joseph J. Yarrows, Collector 



Collections January 1 to March 6, 1934 : 






Levy of 1930, 


$5.36 




Levy of 1932, 


9.15 


$14.51 


Payments to treasurer, January 1 






to March 6, 1934, 




$14.51 



INTEREST ON TAXES 
James L. McGrath, Collector 
Interest collections, 1934 : 



Taxes, 1930, 


$8.04 




Taxes, 1931, 


23.19 




Taxes, 1932,, 


1,388.48 




Taxes, 1933, 


851.09 




Taxes, 1934, 


31.04 




Motor vehicle excise 






taxes, 1930, 


4.19 




Motor vehicle excise 






taxes, 1931, 


16.80 




Motor vehicle excise 






taxes, 1932, 


51.50 




Motor vehicle excise 






taxes, 1933, 


12.67 




Motor vehicle excise 






taxes, 1934, 


.72 


$2,387.72 


otor vehicle excise taxes, 1931, 




reported as interest, 




.05 

$2,387.77 


ayments to treasurer, 


1934, 


$2,387.77 



84 

Collections January 1 to 2, 1935 : 

Taxes, 1932, $19.66 

Taxes, 1933, 8.41 

Taxes, 1934, 3.23 

$31.30 
Payments to treasurer January 1 to 2, 1935, $31.30 



TOWN CLERK 
Dog Licenses 

Licenses issued, 1934: 

Males 100 at $2.00 $200.00 

Spayed females, 14 at 2.00 28.00 
Females, 10 at 5.00 50.00 

$278.00 

Overpayment to treasurer, refunded, 6.60 

Payments to treasurer, $246.00 

Fees retained, 124 at 20 cents, 24.80 
Overpayment to treasurer, per 

previous audit, 6.60 
Cash on hand December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, verified, 7.20 



TOWN CLERK 
Sporting Licenses 
Cash on hand January 1, 1934, $14.00 

Licenses issued : 
Resident citizens' 

fishing, 48 at $2.00, $96.00 

Resident citizens' 

hunting, . 72 at 2.00, 144.00 



$284.60 



$284.60 






85 



Resident citizens' 

sporting, 43 at 3.25, 139.75 

Resident citizens' 
minor and female 
fishing, 25 at 1.25, 31.25 

Resident citizens' 
trapping, 10 at 5.25, 52.50 

Resident citizens' 
minor trap- 
ping, 20 at 2.25, 45.00 

Duplicate, 2 at .50, 1.00 

$509.50 

Payment to Division of Fisheries 

and Game, $457.75 

Fees retained, 218 at 25 cents, 54.50 

Cash on hand December 31, 1934, 11.25 



Cash on hand January 1, 1935, $11.25 

Licenses issued January 1 to January 2, 1935 : 
Resident citizens' 

hunting, 5 at $2.00, $10.00 

Resident citizens' 

sporting, 9 at 3.25, 29.25 

$39.25 



Fees retained January 1 to Jan- 
uary 2, 1935, 14 at 25 cents, $3.50 

Cash on hand January 2, 1935, 

verified, 47.00 



$523.50 



$523.50 



$50.50 



$50.50 



86 
SELECTMEN'S LICENSES 



Licenses issued 1934: 






Gasoline, 


$7.00 




Common victualler, 


2.00 




Peddlers and junk, 


28.00 




Milk and cream, 


.50 




Pool, 


4.00 




Slaughter, 


2.00 




Undertaker, 


2.00 




Alcoholic Beverages, 


2,600.00 


$2,645.50 


Payments to treasurer 1934, 


$2,356.50 




Credit for unexpired licenses 1934, 


263.50 




Outstanding December 31, 1934, 


25.50 


$2,645.50 


Outstanding January 1, 1935, 


$25.50 


Payments to treasurer January 1 






to 2, 1935, 


$25.00 




Outstanding January 2, 1935, per 






list, 


.50 


$25.50 



TOWN HALL RENTS 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $268.00 

Charges, 307.00 

Payments to treasurer, $345.00 

Abatements, 127.00 
Outstanding December 31, 1934 and 

January 2, 1935, per list, 103.00 



$575.00 



$575.00 



87 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Charges 1934 : 

Sealing, $72.91 

Adjusting, 2.85 

$75.76 
Payments to treasurer, $65.48 

Charges for adjusting, retained by 

sealer, 1934, 2.85 

Cash on hand December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, verified, 7.43 

$75.76 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 




Accounts Receivable 






Outstanding January 1, 1934, 


$77.57 




Error in charge, 


.71 


$78.28 


Payments to treasurer, 


$47.14 




Outstanding December 31, 1934, 






and January 2, 1935, per list, 


31.14 


$78.28 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $5.43 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 and January 

2, 1935, per list, $5.43 



SNOW REMOVAL 

Accounts Receivable 
Charges, 1934, $127.30 

Payments to treasurer 1934, $127.30 



PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1934, $30.00 

Charges, 404.22 

Payments to treasurer, $75.52 

Outstanding December 31, 1934 

and January 2, 1935, per list, 358.70 



$434.22 



$434.22 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Accounts Receivable 

Charges, 1934, $141.99 

Payments to treasurer, 1934, $137.71 

Disallowances, 1934, 4.28 

$141.99 



LIBRARY 






Cash on hand January 1, 1934, 


$2.11 




Fines, 


35.41 


$37.52 


Payments to treasurer, 1934, 


$37.11 




Cash on hand December 31, 1934, 


.41 


$37.52 


Cash on hand January 1, 1935, 


$ .41 




Fines, January 1 to 19, 1935, 


2.44 


$2.85 


Cash on hand January 19, 1935, 






verified, 




$2.85 



89 

WATER RATES 

Edson W. Strong, Collector 

Outstanding- January 1, 1934, $1,566.12 

Commitments January 1 to June 

15, 1934, 2,979.34 

Payments to treasurer : 

January 1 to June 

15, 1934, $2,618.29 

June 16 to December 

31, 1934, 23.13 

$2,641.42 
Abatements January 1 to June 15, 

1934, $69.59 

Outstanding June 15, 1934, recom- 
mitted to Charles W. Wade, Col- 
lector, 1,834.45 



Charles W. Wade, Collector 

Recommitment June 16, 1934, $1,834.45 

Commitments June 16 to December 

31, 1934, 3,209.91 

Abatements reported in error, 

adjusted, 49.51 

Payments to treasurer, June 16 to 

December 31, 1934, $2,976.14 

Abatements June 16 to December 

31, 1934, 239.42 

Outstanding December 31, 1934, 1,878.31 



$4,545.46 



$4,545.46 



$5,093.87 



$5,093.87 



90 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, $1,878.31 

Outstanding January 2, 1935, per 

list, $1,776.29 

Cash on hand January 2, 1935, 

verified, 97.15 

Cash variation January 2, 1935, 4.87 

$1,873.31 



HATFIELD LIBRARY FUND 

Savings Securities 

Deposits Par Value Total 
On hand at beginning 

of year 1934, $215.16 $1,400.00 $1,615.16 

On hand at end of year, 

1934, $241.84 $1,400.00 $1,641.84 

Receipts Payments 

Income, $26.68 Added to savings deposits, $26.68 

CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

In Custody In Custody 
of State of Town Securities 
Treasurer Treasurer Par Value Total 
On hand at be- 
ginning of 

year 1934, $300.00 $7,205.39 $500.00 $8,005.39 
On hand at end 

of year 1934, $300.00 $7,464.48 $500.00 $8,264.48 

Receipts Payments 

Requests, $250.00 Added to savings deposits, $259.09 
Income, 254.70 Transfer to town, 245.61 



$504.70 $504.70 



91 











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-4-3 







ANNUAL REPORT 
OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN of HATFIELD 

For the Year Ending 
DECEMBER 31 

r 935 




GAZETTE PRINTING COMPANY 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

1936 



Selectmen's Warrant 

FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, 
FEBRUARY 17, 1936 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Hampshire, ss. 

To A. R. Breor, Constable of the town of Hatfield in 
said County. Greetings. 

In the name of The Commonwealth you are hereby 
directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to meet in 
the Town Hall in said Hatfield on Monday, the 17th day of 
February next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles. 

Article 1. To choose all necessary town officers for 
the ensuing year. Moderato.r Town Clerk. Two Select- 
men for one year. One Assessor for three years. One 
member of the Board of Water Commissioners for three 
years. One member of the Library Committee for three 
years. One member of the School Committee for three 
years. Town Treasurer. Tax Collector. Tree Warden 
Elector under the will of Oliver Smith. 

The Polls will be open at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and kept open for at least four hours, and for such longer 
time as the majority of the voters present shall direct, but 
in no case will they be kept open after eight o'clock in the 
evening. 



Article 2. To hear and discuss all reports or subjects 
which have to do with the welfare of the town and or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 3. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the amounts received from the Dog Fund to the Library 
account. 

Article 5. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the town treasurer with the approval of the selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1936, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with Section 
17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as shall be deemed neces- 
sary to defray the current expenses of the financial year 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $509.59 for the following old ac- 
counts :Fire, $183.54; Welfare, $153.55; and Smith Agri- 
cultural School tuition, $172.50 or act any thing thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the assessors with the approval of the Commissioner of 
Corporations and Taxation to use any available free cash 
from the surplus revenue to reduce the taxes for the cur- 
rent year. 

Article 9. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
list of men for Jurors as submitted by the Selectmen for 
the ensuing year. 



Article 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for snow removal equipment 
and machinery repairs or act any thing thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will vote to install five 
additional street lights, or act any thing thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof in five public places in said town 
seven days before time of said meeting. 

Hereof, fail not and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clark at the time 
and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 5th day of February in 
the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
thirty-six. 

JOHN W. MULLINS, 

JOSEPH V. PORADA, 

LULTHER A. BELDEN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



Report of Finance Committee 



We the Finance Committee wish to submit the fol- 
lowing report : 

Be it recommended that you raise and appropriate 
the following amounts for the conduct and operation of 
your town business for the ensuing year. 

Highways, Sewers, Side- walks, Bridges, etc., $2,000.00 

Chapter 81, 5,750.00 

Electric Lights, 2,400.00 

Bond, Town Officers, 174.50 

Inspection, Animals, Barns, Meats, etc., 240.00 

Inspection of Children, 50.00 

Tree Work, 100.00 

Moth Work, 150.00 

Fire Department, 800.00 

Insurance, 2,325.91 

Interest for Temp, loans and town hall note, 1,826.81 



$15,817.22 



Salaries and Expenses, Town Officers : 

Salaries Exp. 
Moderator, $22.00 



Selectmen, 


264.00 


$100.00 


Clerk, Board Selectmen, 


88.00 




Town Clerk, 


440.00 


100.00 


Town Accountant, 


704.00 


20.00 


Town Treasurer, 


600.00 


100.00 


Assessors, 


748.00 


35.00 


Tax Collector, 


550.00 


110.00 


Sealer Wts. and Measures, 


132.00 


50.00 


Election Registration, 


175.00 





$3,723.00 $515.00 



Brought Forward, 


$20,055.22 


Old Age Assistance, 


1,400.00 


Public Welfare and Equipment, 


4,300.00 


Soldiers' Aid and Relief, 


300.00 


Schools, 


45,000.00 


Tuition, Students at Smith School, 


1,822.50 


School Physicians, 


176.00 


Care of Cemeteries, 


100.00 


Public Library, 


1,013.35 


Memorial Day, 


125.00 


Police Dept. and Equipment, 


2,200.00 


Unclassified, 


200.00 


Attorney's Fees, 


• 100.00 


Care of Town Hall, 


2,000.00 


Water Department, 


1,000.00 




$79,792.07 



We recommend that the following sum be ap- 
propriated from the available Water Surplus 
for Town Hall note and interest, $5,445.56 

We recommend that the following sum be ap- 
propriated from the overlay surplus to re- 
serve fund, $1,000.00 



J. C. H. RICHARDS, 

J. C. RYAN, 

FRANK A. KEMPISTY. 

Finance Committee. 



Town Accountant 



To the Board of Selectmen, 
Hatfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith submit the report of your Town Account- 
ant for the year ending December 31, 1935. 



RECEIPTS 

GENERAL REVENUE 

Tax Levies — Previous years, $29,549.76 

Previous year, Old Age Assistance, 120.00 
Current year, M. V. E. Excise, 3,177.50 

Current year, Poll, 1,186.00 

Current year, Personal and Real, 43,677.17 

$77,710.43 



^om the Commonwealth : 




Income Taxes, 


$5,875:66 


Corporation Taxes, 


1,022.66 


Race Tracks, 


143.50 


Mass. School Fund, 


9,806 67 


Vocational, 


2,019.04 


Smith-Hughe's Fund, 


342.62 


English Speaking Classes, 


36.00 


Tuition, State Wards, 


98.28 


Union Superintendent, 


906.22 



$20,250.65 



License Fees and Permits : 
Peddler and Junk, 
Gasoline, etc., 
Malt Beverages, 
All Alcoholic Beverages, 


$47.00 

30.50 

255.00 

1,525.00 


$1,875.50 
$644.00 

$498.80 
$51.15 


Fines and Forfeits : 

District Curt and County Jail, 

Dog Taxes frm Town and County Treas. : 

Town, $293.40 
County, 205.40 


Northampton Water Dept. in lieu of 
Taxes on Reservoir Land, 





DEPARTMENTAL 



Town Hall Rent, 


$68.00 




Sealer's Fees, 


87.73 


$155.73 






Highways : 






Sale of Materials, 


$21.90 




Road Machinery Earnings, 


1,736.63 




Chapter 81, 


6,825.00 




Chapter 464, Acts 1935, 


2,300.00 


$10,883.53 






Charities : 






Sale of Wood, 


$37.50 




Cities and Towns, 


469.69 




State, 


796.29 




Individuals, 


65.00 


$1 3fi£ 48 



10 
Schools : 



City of Boston Tuition, 
Sale of Materials, 


$59.52 
.50 


$60.02 






Library : 






Fines, 




$33.66 



Water Department: 

Collection Water Rents, 1932-33 

and 1934, $1,503.64 

Collection Water Rents, 1935, 3,941.92 



$5,445.56 



Interest : 



Taxes, $1,616.73 

Tax Titles, 93.52 



Agency and Trust Funds : 

P. C. Funds, 

Withdrawel from Library Fund, 

Interest on Library Fund, 


$697.81 
158.11 

70.00 


$925.92 

$38.31 

$1,857.31 
11.55 


Refunds, 

Tax Title Redemptions, 

Receipts from Individuals for Outlays, 


t 



Total Receipts fr 1935, $123,502.85 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1934, 20,641.04 



Total, $144,143.89 



. 


11 






PAYMENTS 






GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




Selectmen : 








Salaries, 




$240.00 




Expenses, 




68.77 


$308.77 




Clerk, Board of Selectmen : 








Salary, 
Moderator : 






$80.00 


Salary, 






$20.00 


Town Treasurer : 








Salary, 
Expenses, 




$480.00 
140.19 


$620.19 




Tax Collector : 








Salary, 

Postage and Printing, 




$350.00 
131.82 


$481.82 






Assessors : 








Salaries, 

Salaries Taking Census, 

Expenses, 




$680.00 
100.00 

47.48 


$827.48 








Attorney's Fees, 






$15.00 


Town Clerk: 








Salary, 
Expense, 




$400.00 

81.75 





$481.75 



12 






Election and Registration : 






Salaries, 


54.00 




Ballots, 


40.25 


$94.25 






Town Accountant : 






Salary, 


$640.00 




Expense, 


22.17 


$622.17 






Dog Licenses paid to County by 






Town Treasurer, 




$293.40 


Town Hall Maintenance : 






Janitor, Salary, 


$748.80 




Coal, 


500.43 




Light and Power, 


330.21 




Repairs, 


245.88 




Miscellaneous, 


37.12 




Janitor Supplies, 


43.31 


$1,905.75 






Bonds, Town Officers, 




$140.00 



Total General Government, $5,930.58 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Police : 




Salary of Chief, 


$1,600.00 


Wages of Special Officers, 


28.50 


Telephone, 


33.00 


Garage Rent, 


30.00 


Gas and Oil, 


127.72 


Equipment and Repairs, 


214.74 


Supplies, 


30.33 



$2,064.29 



13 



Fire: 

Salary of Chief, 


$120.00 


Firemen, 


309.13 


Rent, 


60.19 


Equipment, 7 Repairs, 


196.22 


Supplies, 


90.77 


Telephone, 


30.50 


Gas and Oil, 


. 53.35 


Fuel and Light, 


29.54 


Sealer of Weights and Measures : 




Salary, 


$120.00 


Expenses, 


50.00 


Forestry : 




Salary and Wages, 


$166.75 


Equipment, 


37.61 


Supplies, 


58.80 


Trucks, 


36.50 


Moth Work : 




Equipment, 


23.68 


Supplies, 


21.95 



$889.70 



$170.00 



$345.29 



Total for Protection, $3,469.28 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 



spection : 




Schools, 


$185.00 


Animals, Meats and Barns, 


198.65 


Expense, 


41.35 



$425.00 



14 



STREET LIGHTS 
Western Counties Electric Co., 

Highways, General : 

Salary and Wages, $599.09 

Salary and Wages, Snow Removal, 576.92 

Lumber, 45.34 

Sewers, 27.00 

Supplies, 283.95 

Signal Light, 6.88 

Gas and Oil, 416.87 

Coal, 42.86 



Highway Machinery Account: 




Snow Plow, 


$338.48 


Repairs, 


679.15 


Highway, Chapter 81 : 




Salary and Wages, 


$3,461.36 


Tar, 


3,314.54 


Stone, 


935.76 


Gravel, 


488.20 


Trucks, 


4,264.00 


Tile, 


145.41 


Tools, 


21.85 


Miscellaneous, 


19.30 



$1,850.00 



$1,998.91 



$1,017.63 



$12,650.42 



WELFARE 



Groeries and Provisions, 
Other Towns and Cities, Cash, 
Town Relief, Cash, 
Traveling Expense, 
Clothing, 



J549.19 
377.25 
839.01 
160.81 
26.41 



15 



Coal and Wood, 


142.21 


Board and Care, 


1,012.65 


State and County Institutions, 


445.57 


Mother's Aid, 


478.00 


Old Age Relief, 


901.00 


Medical Aid and Care, 


474.00 


Telephone, 


25.45 


Tools and Equipment, 


103.50 


Printing and Postage, 


19.71 


Miscellaneous, 


63.50 




$5,618.34 



SOLDIER'S RELIEF 



Other Towns, 


$200.00 


SCHOOLS 




General Expense : 




Committee Salaries, 


$160.00 


District Supt., 


1,450.00 


Enforcement Officer, 


300.00 


Postage and Printing, 


16.69 


Telephone, 


101.23 


Traveling Expense, 


287.94 


Census, 


25.00 


Nurse, 


799.98 


Nurse Expenses, 


19.71 




$3 160 ^ 


Teacher's Salaries : 


<pO f lUu .OO 


High, 


$10,132.67 


Elementary, 


16,874.44 


Substitutes, 


160.00 


Vocational and Shop, 


353.30 


Americanization, 


99.00 


Music, 


661.76 

$28 981.17 



16 



Text Books and Supplies : 

High, Books, $494.11 

Elm, Books, 913.74 

High, Supplies, 518.26 

Elm, Supplies, 980.95 

Commercial, Books and Supplies, 56.18 

Commercial, Equipment, 159.36 



$3,122.60 



Transportation, $1,746.90 






Vocational : 

Postage and Printing, $8.91 

Transportation, 6.25 

Agricultural Supplies, 95.59 

Agricultural Books, 10.11 



Household Arts, Supplies, 73.46 



Janitors : 

High, $500.00 

Elm, 1,919.99 



Fuel and Light: 

High, $356.97 

Elm, 2,548.45 



$194.3: 



$2,419.99 



12,905.42 



Maintenance, Buildings and Grounds : 

Janitor, Supplies, High, $56.11 

Janitr, Supplies, Elm, 291.45 

Repairs, Elm, 1,066.77 

Miscellaneous, Elm, 32.28 



$1,446.61 



Graduation Exercises and Diplomas, $88.00 

Equipment, $387.47 



Total for Schools, $43,753.03 



17 

SMITH'S AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition, Hatfield Students, $1,050.00 

Eleven students attending Smith 
School, December 31, 1935. 







LIBRARY 






Salaries : 
Librarian, 
Assistants, 
Janitor, 
Books, 
Periodicals, 


Book Stacks, 

INSURANCE 


$330.33? 

93.30 

110.20 . 

516.90 

31.25 

30.16 

99.50 

9.85 

1.85 

21.70 

82.56 

10.00 


i *> 


Bindings, 

Fuel, 

Light, 

Postage, 

Supplies, 

Equipment, 

Repairs, 


$1,337.60 








^ 


Schools, 

Workmen's Compensation, 

Town Machinery, 


$1,712.48 
460.21 
244.75 


$2,417.44 



MEMORIAL DAY 

Band, $75.00 

Flags, 27.50 

Transportation, 15.50 



$118.00 







18 






UNCLASSIFIED 




Town Reports, 


printing, 




$140.00 


Town Reports. 


, Delivering, 




11.18 


Care of Town Clock, 




25.00 


Elector, 1934-< 


35, 




20.00 



$196.18 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Commissioner's Salaries, $150.00 



Collector's Salary and Labor, 


250.00 


Collector's Bond, 


5.00 


Postage, 


5.25 


Labor, 


301.20 


Pipe and Fittings, 


230.80 


Equipment, 


20.40 


Lumber, 


30.82 


Supplies, 


10.98 



$1,004.45 

CEMETERIES 

Labor : 

Main St. Cemetery, $44.00 

Hill Cemetery, 10.00 

W. Hatfield Cemetery, 15.00 

N. Hatfield Cemetery, 16.00 

Bradstreet Cemetery, 15.00 

$100.00 

INTEREST 
Town Hall Notes, $1,593.75 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Temporary Loans, 1934 Loan, $10,000.00 

Town Hall Notes, 5,000.00 

$15,000.00 



19 



AGENCY, TRUST AND INVESTMENT 



State Taxes, 


$4,100.00 


County Tax, 


7,351.42 


State Audit, 


238.54 


State Parks, 


45.02 


State Veteran's Exemption, 


16.24 


Interest, Library Bonds (Deposit), 


70.00 


P. C. Funds, H. W. Smith Fund, 




(Deposit), 


12.00 


P. C. Funds, Care of Lots, 


248.81 


P. C. Funds, Cleaning Stones, 


437.00 


State Tax, OAA Special, 


3.00 " 




$12,522.03 



REFUNDS 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes, 



$144.91 



Postage, 

Investigators Salary, 
Office Supplies and P 
Trucks and Teams, 
Stone and Gravel, 
Tools and Supplies, 
Sewing Project, 
Moth and Tree Work, 
Miscellaneous, 



Total Payments, 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1935, 



ERA— WPA 






$9.04 




566.50 


Lone, 


69.93 




2,195.25 




173.63 




313.38 




130.07 




307.51 




3,686.53 



$7,451.84 

$119,849.39 
24,294.50 

$144,143.89 



V. H. KELLER, 

Town Accountant. 



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25 



Treasurer's Report 



John R. McGrath, Treasurer, in account with 

TOWN OF HATFIELD 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1935, $20,641.04 

Receipts for the year, 123,502.85 

$144,143.89 

Payments for 1935 per Warrants, $119,849.39 
Balance December 31, 1935, 24,294.50 

: $144,143.89 

Cash in Office, Verified, $128.23 

Check book balance, 24,166.27 

$24,294.50 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 



26 



PERPETUAL CARE CEMETERY AND 
OTHER FUNDS 





Income 


Expense 


Balance 


Fund 


1935 


1935 


1935 


Hannah W. Smith, 


$15.16 


$60.00 


$103.95 


Augusta Wells, 


10.40 


75.00 


342.42 


Oliver Warner, 


1.61 


2.00 


53.05 


John H. Sanderson, 


3.28 


9.00 


105.44 


Luman M. Moore, 


6.53 


33.00 


214.68 


P. M. Wells, 


3.87 


3.00 


129.04 


Benjamin Waite, 


2.78 


4.00 


90.91 


Abby Dickinson, 


3.13 


3.50 


103.48 


Silas G. Hubbard, 


8.22 


34.00 


276.34 


Levi Graves, 


4.77 


24.00 


159.00 


Lucy L. Morton, 


9.17 


64.00 


309.00 


Charles Smith, 


3.42 


10.00 


110.01 


Lemuel B. Field, 


3.40 


10.00 


109.18 


Rufus H. Cowles, 


3.46 


10.00 


111.44 


Charles E. Hubbard, 


3.60 


14.00 


114.10 


Alpheus Cowels, 


3.32 


9.00 


107.18 


James Porter, 


3.31 


3.31 


109.51 


Daniel W. Allis, 


4.57 


4.00 


152.22 


J. H. Howard, 


3.26 


4.00 


107.48 


Fannie M. Burke, 


3.33 


3.33 


110.82 


Charles S. Shattuck, 


3.33 


3.33 


110.63 


Seth W. Kingsley, 


3.31 


3.31 


109.45 


E. S. Warner, 


5.12 


6.00 


205.43 


Reuben Belden, 


3.02 


3.02 


100.00 


Theodore Porter, 


3.20 


3.20 


106.18 


Charles L. Graves, 


3.20 


3.20 


106.22 


Roswell Hubbard, 


3.14 


4.00 


103.54 


Cooley D. Dickinson, 


3.93 


5.00 


129.63 


Elijah Bard well, 


11.99 


65.00 


374.43 


Joseph D. Billings, 


3.13 


4.00 


102.92 



27 



Edward C. Billings, 


27.27 


82.50 


580.03 


Augusta Beals, 


3.23 


3.23 


107.29 


Anthony Douglas, 


1.80 


1.80 


55.24 


J. E. Porter, 


3.08 


3.00 


102.43 


Jonathan Graves, 


3.15 


3.50 


104.12 


Hugh McLeod, 


3.09 


3.00 


102.92 


B. M. Warner, 


6.20 


31.20 


205.10 


Chester Hastings, 


3.11 


3.00 


103.14 


Lucius & Stearns Curtis, 


7.55 


10.00 


250.23 


Frary & Gardner, 


3.03 


3.00 


100.57 


Henry C. Batchellor, 


3.05 


3.05 


101.26 


T. F. Knight & Jno Porter, 


12.43 


• 8.00 


416.25 


H. W. Carl, 


3.07 


2.00 


102.73 


Scott & Herman Harris, 


5.00 


5.00 


200.00 


Thaddeus & Solomon Graves, 


6.08 


6.00 


201.91 


J. D. Brown, 


3.02 


3.02 


100.00 


Mary E. Hubbard, 


3.26 


3.26 


100.00 


Samuel H. Field, 


4.53 


4.00 


150.53 


Lewis S. Dyer, 


3.05 


3.05 


101.00 


Perpetual Care Funds Received, 






248.96 


Paid Out Care of Lots and Stones, 




660.81 


Hatfield Library Fund, Inter- 








est on Mortgage, 


78.73 


158.11 


162.46 



JOHN R. McGRATH, 

Treasurer. 



28 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed biuldings, 


$1,464,895.00 


Value of assessed land, 


926,365.00 


Value of assessed real estate, 


2,391,260.00 


Value of assessed personal estate, 


187,710.00 


Value of assessed real and personal estate, 


2,578,970.00 


Rate of tax per $1,000.00, 


26.50 


Number of polls assessed, 


706 


Number of horses assessed, 


233 


Number of cows assessed, 


245 


Number of neat cattle assessed, 


111 


Number of sheep assessed, 


425 


Number of fowl assessed, 


1,350 


Number of dwelling houses assessed, 


470 


Number of automobiles assessed, 


629 


Acres of land assessed, 


8,943 


Town appropriation, 


$90,578.20 


State tax, 


3,895.00 


State audit tax, 


238.54 


State parks tax, 


30.00 


Veterans' exemption, 


16.00 


County tax, 


7,667.75 


Overlayings, 


1,468.28 


ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 




Income tax, 


$10,518.99 


Corporation tax, 


916.77 


Race track distribution, 


205.00 


Excise tax, 


2,300.00 


Licenses, 


70.00 


Fines, 


200.00 



29 

Schools, 8,000.00 

General Government, 200.00 

Available Funds, 9,867.60 

All others, 1,859.40 

Additional assessment, Real Estate, 100.00 



VALUE OF PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Under Chapter 59, General Laws 

Church Property, $68,000.00 

Town Property, 363,055.00 

Holy Trinity Cemetery, 3,500.00 

Smith Academy, 32,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN R. McGRATH, 
JOSEPH D. DONNIS, 
JOHN J. FUSEK. 



30 



Town Clerk's Report 



VITAL STATISTICS, 1935 
BIRTHS TO HATFIELD PARENTS BY MONTHS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



Male 


Female 


1 


2 





2 





1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


2 





2 


1 


1 


1 





3 


1 









Total, 



11 



13 



BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 



United States, 
Poland, 
England, 
Nova Scotia, 



thers 


Mothers 


19 


20 


4 


2 





1 


1 


1 



Total, 24 



BIRTHS FOR FIVE PRECEDING YEARS 



24 



1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


40 


28 


31 


37 


29 



31 
MARRIAGES BY MONTHS— 1935 



January, 


1 


First marriage of both, 


15 


February, 


2 


Second of Groom, 




1 


March, 





Second of Bride, 






April, 


1 


Youngest Groom, 




19 


May, 





Oldest Groom, 




34 


June, 


1 


Youngest Bride, 




17 


July, 


4 


Oldest Bride, 




32 


August, 


2 


Birthplace 


Groom 


Bride 


September, 


2 


United States, 


16 


16 


October, 


2 








November, 


1 








December, 












Total, 16 

NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 

1935 

Joseph Raboin Amelia S. Burda 

Michalina Kosakoski Helen Kociela 

Sophie Malinoski Herbert D. Smith 

Patrick J. Boyle John A. Jackowski 

Dennis Whalen Edward A. Ryan 

John Holt Ercent E. Godin 

Helen M. Hoff Belden Anelia N. Pelc 

Edward Wesolowski Exilda C. Raboin 

Katarzine Jandzinski Wayne Mathieu 

Nellie Z. Palmisano Amelia M. Gowash 
Mary E. Frain 

DOG LICENSES 

1935 

Cash on hand, 12, 31, '34, $7.20 

Licenses issued 1935: 

Males, 108 at $2.00, $216.00 



32 

Females, 12 at $5.00, 60.00 

Spayed Females, 19 at $2.00, 38.00 



$321.20 

Fees retained 1935 : 

139 at $.20, $27.80 



$293.40 
Paid to Town Treasurer, $293.40 



SPORTING LICENSES 

Cash on hand, 12, 31, '34, $11.25 

Licenses issued 1935: 

Resident citizens fishing, 58 at $2.00, $116.00 

Resident citizens hunting, 92 at $2.00, 184.00 

Resident citizens sporting, 44 at $3.25, 143.00 
Resident citizens minor and females 

fishing, 23 at $1.25, 28.75 

Resident citizens trapping, 10 at $2.25, 22.50 

Non-reident citizen fishing, 1 at $5.25, 5.25 

Non-resident citizen hunting, 1 at $10.25, 10.25 

Special non-resident fishing, 1 at $1.50, 1.50 

Duplicate, 1 at $.50, 50 
Free licenses persons, 70 years and up, 5, 



Payments to Div. Fish and Games, $505.50 
Fees retained, 240 at $.25, 60.00 

Cash on hand, 12, 31, '35, 10.00 



$575.50 



$575.00 



V. H. KELLER, 

Town Clerk. 






Librarian's Report 



To the Trustees of the Public Library : 

At the beginning of the year Miss Carrie Cutter of 
West Hatfield and Mrs. Agnes Kacinski of Bradstreet, 
custodians of book loans, felt unable to take charge of the 
books and I could find no one to replace them. 

So, we opened the library on Tuesdays from 12 to 1 
to give the pupils of the outlying districts who attend 
school in the center an opportunity to borrow books. We 
feel well repaid for the extra work. 

In November, the people of Bradstreet obtained per- 
mission of the selectmen to open the hall in the school 
building on Tuesday evenings from 7 to 9 for reading pur- 
poses and circulation of books and magazines. It has 
proved a very popular place for the young people. 

The library continues to supply the best in non-fiction, 
and books in Polish, Slovak and German, borrowed from 
the Division of Public Libraries in Boston. 

The library contains over 8,000 volumes, 356 of them 
were purchased during the year. The circulation of non- 
fiction for 1935 was 1,240 — quite an increase over the 
year preceding. The entire circulation was 14,005. 

There were several gifts of books and a framed photo- 
graph of Clarence Hawkes presented by him for the chil- 
dren's room. 

I wish to express appreciation of the faithful work 
of my assistant, Miss Margaret Hayes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. MULLANY, 

Librarian. 



The trustees of the library regret to accept the resig- 
nation of Mrs. Margaret Mullany, who has ably and ef- 
ficiently served as librarian for the past five years. 

CATHERINE MULLANY, 

THERESA GODIN, 

FANNIE CARL. 






35 



Water Commissioners' Report 



We were very fortunate this year to obtain enough 
Federal money to complete the hook-up of our main on 
the State road, where we had to relay it to make way for 
the new bridge over Running Gutter Brook, and also to 
make extensive changes in our reservoir.. 

At the reservoir we have made a settling basin above 
the main pond, to take care of any wash from heavy rains. 

The water from this basin now enters the main res- 
ervoir over two dams, and should come to the consumer 
much purer than ever before, having been settled and 
aerated before entering the reservoir. 

The main basin has been greatly enlarged and 
deepened, giving us a larger storage. The banks have 
been ripraped with stone, and all trees except the ever- 
greens removed for a distance of about 200 feet on all 
sides. Removing these trees will give our young pines 
and spruce a better chance to grow, and will keep out the 
leaves that have bothered us so much in the past. 

With our present set up we have one of the best water 
systems for a town of its size in the State. Every family 
in Hatfield is served by the system. 

J. W. KILEY, 
L. A. DEINLEIN, 
R. G. BILLINGS, 
Board of Water Commissioners. 



36 



Tax Collector's Report 



TAXES, 1933 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, $11,309.76 

Payments to Treasurer, $9,566.69 

Abatements, 20.35 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, 1,667.26 

Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 55.46 



$11,309.76 



TAXES, 1934 



Outstanding January 1, 1935, $27,197.47 

Payments to Treasurer, $18,439.73 

Abatements, 19.45 

Transfer to Tax Titles, 179.42 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, 8,566.87 

Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 2.00 

$27,197.47 

TAXES, 1935 

Commitment per Warrant, $69,756.02 

Additional Commitment, 2.65 

Overpayment, Adjusted, .02 

_ $69,758.69 

Payments to Treasurer, $44,863.17 

Abatements, 385.43 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, 24,510.09 

$69,758.69 



o 



7 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES, 1933 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, $170.56 

Payments to Treasurer, $66.59 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, 103.97 

$170.56 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES, 1934 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, $920.89 

Payments to Treasurer, $597.90 

Abatements, -9.32 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, 313.67 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES, 1935 

Commitment per Warrants, $4,187.62 

Abatements after payment, refunded, 144.91 



Payments to Treasurer, 
Abatements, 


$3,177.50 
374.32 


yXytJtJt-I.VlS 


Warrant Adjustment, 

1934 refund entered as 1935, 


10.00 
1.85 




Outstanding December 31, 1935, 


768.86 


$4,332.53 



JAMES L. McGRATH, 

Tax Collector. 



38 



Police Report 



Hatfield, Mass. 
December 31, 1935. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The report of the Police Department for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1935 is herewith respectfully submitted. 



Total number of arrests 


in the Town of Hatfield, 


133 


Drunkness, 




17 


Driving while under the influence of liquor, 
Automobile Violations, 


9 
57 


Assault, 




6 


Larceny, 

Fish and Game, 




6 

1 


Vagrancy, 

Hawking and Peddling, 
Neglect of Family, 
Desertion of Family, 
Driving to Endanger, 
Malicious Mischief, 




7 
4 
2 
1 
11 
6 


Neglected Children, 




6 



133 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chief of Police. 



39 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE BOARD OF 
SELECTMEN FOR 1936 



John F. Batsold 
Robert Bieber, Jr. 
Michael W. Boyle 
Alfred E. Breor 
Alexander Celotka 
Carlton Crafts 
Joseph Donnis 
Rupert Englehardt 
David Fitzgerald 
Richard F. Fitzgerald 
Harry E. Graves 
Robert J. Graves 
Teofil Harubin 
Peter Malinowski 
John R. McGrath 
David Mullaney 
Harry W. Marsh 
John T. Shea 
John Osley, Jr. 
Alex T. Rogalewski 
Merril Strong 
Adolph Toczko 
Charles Slattery 
Raymond Labbee 
Charles W. Wade 
Nicholas Stazko 
Stanley Ziezulewicz 
Andrew Zawadzki, Elm St. 
Edward Zaskey 
Leonard Vollinger 
Leo Wilkes 

Lawrence A. Doppman 
William R. Cutter 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



School Committee 



FOR THE 



Town of Hatfield 



OF THE 



Year Ending December 31, J 935 



43 

School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Edward A. Breor, Chairman Term expires, 1937 

Harold J. Morse, Secretary Term expires, 1936 

Jos. F. Chandler Term expires, 1938 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

William E. Hebard, 72 Ridge wood Terrace, Northampton 
Telephone 1088 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D. 
R. C. Byrne, M. D. 

SCHOOL NURSE 

Marian Holmes, R. N., 82 Harrison Avenue, Northampton 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 
Chief Arthur R. Breor 

SCHOOL CENSUS 
As of October 1, 1935 





Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Between 5 and 7 


34 


30 


64 


Between 7 and 14 


171 


184 


355 


Between 14 and 16 


61 


53 


114 



Totals for 1935 266 267 533 



44 

A comparison with the four previous years shows a 
marked decrease: 

Census of 1931 recorded 373 357 730 

Census of 1932 recorded 356 325 681 

Census of 1933 recorded 313 320 633 

Census of 1934 recorded 282 291 573 

A decrease of 197 pupils, or almost 27 per cent in the 
four years. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR AND NOTES 

Winter Term — January 6 to February 21. 

Vacation of one week. 

* 
Spring* Term — March 2 to April 9. 

Vacation of ten days. 

Summer Term — April 21 to June 18. 
Summer vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall Term — September 8 to December 22. 
The next term to open January 4, 1937. 



Schools will not be in session on the following days: 

February 22 — April 10 (Good Friday). 
April 19 — September 7 (Labor Day) . 
October 12 — November 11. 
November 26 and 27. 

Schools will be in session all day on days preceding 
the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. A portion of 
each afternoon may be used for programs appropriate to 
the holiday. For that matter there is worth in appro- 
priate exercises preceding other holidays of national im- 
portance. 

September 8th will call for whole school day in all 
schools. 



45 



School Committee's Report 



To the Inhabitants of Hatfield : 

The reports of the Superintendent of Schools, the 
Principal of Smith Academy, the School Nurse and Super- 
visor of Music tell the activities of your schools and what 
may be done to maintain our schools for our best interests. 
We ask every voter to give them thoughtful attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD A. BREOR, 
HAROLD J. MORSE, 
JOSEPH F. CHANDLER. 



46 



Superintendent's Report 



To the School Committee and citizens of Hatfield : 

Herewith is the fifth annual report which it is my 
privilege to submit as superintendent of your schools. 



Personnel Changes 

Within the past fiscal year there have been four 
changes in teachers — two in Smith Academy and two in 
the elementary schools. Miss Ellen M. O'Hara accepted 
an appointment in her home town, Greenfield, after nine 
years service in the Bradstreet School. In the remaining 
three changes marriage caused cessation of school service. 
Miss Jean Belden resigned abruptly in January, and Mrs. 
Kalloch substituted in her former position until March. 
At that time Miss Frances V. Annis of Lynn, a graduate 
of Boston University who was teaching her third year in 
a Maine high school, was elected to that position. When 
Miss Mary Nolan resigned, Miss Elizabeth Baker was 
promoted to full time commercial teacher in the academy. 
Then Miss Margaret Stoddard of this town and a graduate 
of the McCarthy Business College was elected into the 
penmanship-commercial position. Peter G. Staszko, a 
local resident and a graduate of Boston College, was elect- 
ed to the Center School position from which Miss Kathleen 
Connelly resigned. Miss Helen F. Boyle of Hatfield and 
graduate of the four year degree course at North Adams 
received the appointment to the Bradstreet vacancy. 

During the summer the committee to my pleasure and 
other residents I know voted to restore the Household 
Arts courses into the curriculum at Smith Academy. 



47 

Miss Dorothy Allaire of Hatfield and a graduate of the 
Framing-ham Teachers College was the appointee. Where 
the courses had not been offered for two years many of 
the former pupils had left school but two groups of be- 
ginning pupils were enrolled. This coming September 
will see the courses functioning normally. 

With malice toward no one teacher intended but 
rather on the basis that all teachers' colleges and regular 
colleges now require four years of study before granting 
a degree, I believe that no less should be acceptable for 
future local teaching vacancies in Hatfield regardless of 
residence. I would even go more and prefer two years 
of similar or contribu table experience to the type of posi- 
tion to be filled. 

Pupil Placement 

For comparison and study I present the present mem- 
bership in the schools of the town and the elementary 
membership will be distributed by grades as well as build- 
ings. 





















Buildinj 




I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


VII 


VIII 


Totals 


N. Hatfield 


5 


8 


6 


5 


6 


7 


8 


6 


51 


Brad street 


2 


5 


9 


2 


11 


10 






39 


School Street 


19 


21 














40 


Center 






20 


27 


36 


47 


52 


47 


229 


Hill 


16 


11 


9 


11 










47 


Grade Totals 


42 


45 


44 


45 


53 


64 


60 


53 


406 


Smith Academy 


















145 



Present membership in all grades 551 

There has been a decrease in membership of thirty- 
four (34) since last year and a decrease of sixty-five (65) 
in two years. 

Look at the vital records of the town clerk and it ap- 
pears that there may be quite further decrease in pupils 
for Grade I for the coming September. Those pupils will 



" 48 

include the children born from April, 1930 to April, 1931, 
so far as the families still remain in town plus or minus 
family removals from town. 

Now if the necessity of economy demands there might 
be two solutions : Either, close the Primary Room at Brad- 
street and bring those pupils to the School Street building, 
or reassign the pupils who would usually go to School 
Street to the Hill School in part and have two grades in 
each of the lower grade rooms at the Center School. 
Neither of these solutions would be agreeable to teachers 
and parents who would have pupils, especially the younger 
ones, away all day. It would be no more disadvantageous 
to the pupils in the central area of the town than it now 
is with the two grades at the Hill School and three and 
four grades at Bradstreet and North Hatfield. It can be 
done, but frankly, is it necessary? 

When the enrollment lowers so that bus accommoda- 
tions would permit without duplication of trips it would 
not be a far step from the present departmental teaching 
in the Center School to a straight Junior High there which 
would enroll all the pupils of the town in grades VII and 
VIII, and perhaps IX, completely centralized on the upper 
floor of that same Center School. The academic subjects 
would be unified and the new recreation field would permit 
of a creditable physical education program. 

A Junior High program would permit of an inter- 
change of teachers with Smith Academy to a certain ex- 
tent, whereby teachers of a given subject from the Acad- 
emy would supervise if not teach that subject through the 
entire six grades. It would tend to obliterate that gap 
so-called between grade VIII and the Freshman program. 

Figuratively Speaking 

A discussion of income and outgo is just as necessary 
a function of school procedure as it ought to be of the 
home and public affairs. It may be that not enough real 



49 

thinking has been done along this line in all walks of life 
lately. However our real concern in this instance is school 
finances. 

The past year — 1935 — Hatfield expended for school 
privileges in town, $43,753.03 

As a result of some of these disburse- 
ments this year and some during the previous 
year the following amounts as specified came 
into the town treasury in 1935: 

General School Fund— Part I, $7,553.98 



General School Fund — Part II, 


4,547.18 


Acct. of Supt. of Schools, 


906.22 


Vocational Accts., 


2,019.04 


Federal Funds, 


342.62 


State Wards, 


98.28 


City Ward, 


59.52 




$15,526.84 



This means roughly 35 per cent came from sources 
other than local assessment. For the financial forecast 
hereafter presented I would expect a similar reimburse- 
ment. 

In accordance with the procedure resumed last year 
I shall give the expenditures of 1931 and similar costs for 
1935 and a financial forecast for 1936. From press items 
within the past year, it would appear reasonable to return 
a part of the salary reductions, and the salary and wages 
estimates herewith allow for a return of half the reduc- 
tion hitherto enacted. 





For Comparison 


Forecast 




1931 1935 


1936 


General Administration : 






Committee, 


$400.00* $160.00 


$176.00 


Supt. of Schools 


1,550.03 1,450.00 


1,510.00 



50 

School Nurse, 999.97 799.98 880.00 

Attendance Officer, 400.00 300.00 330.00 

Telephone, 161.76 100.23 120.00 
Traveling, Supt. and 

Voc.Acct., 320.62 287.94 300.00 

Census, 50.00* 25.00 25.00 
Printing", Postage and 

Stationery, 116.96 16.69 50.00 

Sundries, 3.00 9.00 



$4,002.34 $3,139.84 $3,400.00 



Instruction : 



High School, $11,709.69 $10,353.26 $8,675.00 

Grades, 23,416.07 17,315.61 19,050.00 

Substitutes, 543.50 160.00 

Voc. Shop and Inst. 1936, 3,075.00 



$35,859.26 $28,182.17 $30,800.00 

Books and Supplies : 

Higtti School Books, 

Supplies, 
Commercial Material, 
Vocational Material, 
Household Arts Sup., 
Grade School Books, 

Supplies, 
Health Material, 

$3,073.61 $3,336.63 $2,875.00 

Transportation, $1,435.95 $1,746.90 $1,725.00 

Janitor Service— High, $600.00 $500.00 $550.00 
Grades, 2,740.93 1,919.99 2,100.00 



$427.25 


$494.11 


$400.00 


892.85 


518.26 


600.00 


101.67 


215.54 


200.00 


Not divided 


120.86 


100.00 


308.64 


73.46 


250.00 


475.30 


913.74 


500.00 


867.90 


980.95 


800.00 




19.71 


25.00 



51 

Janitor Supplies— High 56.11 50.00 

Grades, 291.45 200.00 

$3,340.93 $2,767.55 $2,900.00 

Fuel, Light and Power: 

Academy, $986.75 $356.97 $500.00 

Grades, 3,194.54 2,548.45 - 2,600.00 

$4,181.29 $2,905.42 $3,100.00 

Maintenance and Repairs : 

Academy, $157.84 $ $100.00 

Grades, 662.00 1,066.77 650.00 

Sundries, 32.28 50.00 



$819.84 $1,099.05 $800.00 

Equipment, $387.47 $200.00 

Americanization Classes, 99.00 100.00 

Miscellaneous, 79.99 88.00 100.00 



Totals, $52,809.37 $43,753.03 $46,000.00 



*These salaries were for two years. 

At Random 

To give a picture of your superintendent's activities 
I give herewith notes jotted from my school diary for a 
single week which are typical of many weeks of the school 
year. 

Jan. 14 — A. M. Working on reports for both towns. 

P. M. Meeting with Hadley committee in Mr. 
Dwyer's office. Hadley reports and estimates accepted. 
During the evening telephone inquiry about available Hat- 
field substitutes. 



52 

Jan. 15 — A. M. In Hatfield — two house calls in 
Bradstreet. Dinner interrupted by two janitor supply 
salesmen. 

P. M. Typed the Hatfield report. Meanwhile inter- 
viewed candidate for Latin and French vacancy. How r 
news of this sort travels ! 

In the evening was in Hatfield again for a long com- 
mittee meeting. Annual report and finances discussed. 
Calendar adopted. Preference indicated for equivalent 
experience for position recently resigned for French and 
Latin teacher. 

Jan. 16 — Hatfield. Left school report at Town Office. 
Discussed athletic accounts with Mr. Burke. When com- 
mittee pay they want to know full particulars. 

P. M. In Hadley. Measured oil at Hopkins. Order- 
ed coal for Portable. Checked over paper towels. An- 
other salesman called at 4:30. Another candidate for 
Hatfield position without experience. 

Jan. 17 — All day in Hadley. Ate lunch at Russellville 
and was not bothered by salesman. Arranged for substi- 
tute. Placed order for Hopkins oil requirement. 

Jan. 18 — Hatfield in forenoon. Mrs. Kalloch can substi- 
tute until successor is appointed. 

P. M. Greenfield-Superintendents' luncheon followed 
by group discussion in preparation for the April confer- 
ence at Bridgewater. Supervision of Teaching is our as- 
signment and a large one. 

Jan. 19 — Yes, Saturday. 'Met with Hadley Finance 
Committee and our estimate seemed favorable. (It was 
voted.)" 

It may be that someone of the readers of this report 
tried to reach the superintendent meanwhile and wondered 
why he was not attending to business better. Not all 
weeks are as busy with administration matters and then 
I attend to the supervision part of the office. 

Frankly if it were possible to have some clerical as- 
sistance during the months of January, May, June and 



September the general supervision of the schools of this 
district would be more efficient. 

I am satisfied that each individual pupil has made 
progress — not necessarily equal — during the past year. 
The relations with the teachers and pupils have been 
cordial. The committee members have been genuinely 
interested in their schools. All is to the credit of favor- 
able education facilites in Hatfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. HEBARD, 
Superintendent of Schools, 

Hadley and Hatfield. 



54 



Principal of Smith Academy 



To the Superintendent of Schools and the School Commit- 
tee of Hatfield: 

I hereby submit my sixth annual report as Principal 
of Smith Academy. The opening registration was 146. 

The enrollment in Smith Academy at present is 136 — 
70 girls and 66 boys. Last year the opening registration 
was 145. 

The graduation class of 1935, numbered 29, the 
largest in the history of the school. 

The return of the Household Arts course in Septem- 
ber broadens the school curriculum sufficiently to care for 
the needs and capacities of the students. The Classical, 
Scientific, Commercial and Agricultural courses are func- 
tioning successfully. The General Course has been prac- 
tically eliminated as a course of study by the broader elec- 
tive system now enjoyed and made possible by the intro- 
duction of vocational and commercial subjects to the cur- 
riculum. 

The problem of student health is carefully guarded 
by school physician, Robert Byrne, M. D. and school nurse, 
Marion D. Holmes, R. N. Physical examination of every 
student is held at the opening of school in the fall and the 
results entered on the student's life history card. Boy 
and girl members of atheletic teams are again examined 
before the beginning of the basketball and baseball sea- 
sons. Results of these examinations are made known to 
the supervisors of student atheltics, with the result that 
no student is allowed to participate in atheltics, competi- 
tive or otherwise, without the sanction of our school medi- 
cal authorities. 



The faculty experienced several changes during the 
year. Miss Jean Belden, instructor in languages and di- 
rector of girls' athletics, resigned in December, upon her 
marriage to Mr. John Randolph of Washington, D. C. 
Although Miss Belden was with us only a few months, 
she established a broader program of girls' atheltics, and 
at the same time conducted her language classes in an 
efficient manner. No appointment was made to fill the 
vacancy until early in March. During this period, we 
were fortunate in securing the services of Mrs. John R. 
Kalloch, who had previously held this position. 

In March, Miss Frances Annis, graduate of Boston 
University, was elected to fill the vacancy. Previous to 
her coming to Smith Academy, Miss Annis had held for 
two and one-half years a similar position in Brookline, Me. 

In August, Miss Mary M. Nolan, head of the com- 
mercial department, resigned after five years of service. 
Miss Nolan, who was appointed when the commercial de- 
partment was installed, built up a course which continued 
efficient throughout a period of expansion which culmi- 
nated in the necessity for an assistant in that department. 
With her resignation the school lost not only an efficient 
teacher but one whose loyalty and sympathy made her a 
very valuable member of the faculty. Miss Nolan's mar- 
riage to Mr. Joseph G. Smith, a graduate of the school, 
took place on September 9, 1935. 

Miss Elizabeth Baker, who had acted as assistant, 
has been promoted and is now head of the commercial de- 
partment. The position of assistant was filled by the ap- 
pointment of Miss Margaret E. Stoddard, an alumna of 
this school and a graduate of McCarthy's Business College. 

With the reestablishment of the Household Arts de- 
partment, Miss Dorothy M. Allaire, an alumna of this 
school and graduate of Framinham Teachers' College, was 
appointed instructor. That this course really fills a need 
in the school is evident from the fact that twenty-seven 
girls are enrolled in the home-making classes. Miss Al- 



56 

laire is also conducting classes in sewing for the girls of 
the seventh and eighth grades of the Center School. 

In the athletic program carried on during the 1935 
season, Coach Kalloch and his teams enjoyed a successful 
year. The basketball team finished midway in the Hamp- 
shire League. No baseball schedule was attempted owing 
to the renovation of the athletic field as an ERA project. 
The girls' basketball team was coached by Miss Belden in 
the earlier part of the season. After her resignation., the 
coaching of the team was taken over by the vice principal, 
C. J. Larkin, with Miss Nolan as faculty attendant. The 
girls won the 1935 Hampshire League championship with- 
out losing a game in league competition. 

Since the opening of school in September, the athletic 
program is more comprehensive and satisfactory, from the 
standpoint of "Athletics For All," than in any recent year. 

The soccer season found many candidates out for 
practice and Coach Kalloch developed a light but fast team 
which suffered few losses and won from some of the best 
teams in the valley. Boys not members of varsity squads 
have an opportunity for supervised games under the di- 
rection of Coaches Kalloch and Larkin. 

Regular classes in physical education for girls have 
been oragnized by Miss Annis, director of girls' athletics, 
and her assistant, Miss Allaire. This program requires 
participation on the part of every girl in some form of 
organized activity. During the fall, volley ball, relay 
races, and other outdoor games made up the program. 
Intra-mural basketball and regular setting-up exercisees 
are held in the town hall during the winter season. In- 
terest in athletics for girls has led to the organization of 
classes in the junior high school, under the direction of 
Miss Allaire. 

I wish to express my appreciation of the generosity 
of the school committee in furnishing the school with the 
following equipment : radio, for the auditorium ; 103 steel 
lockers, 40 of which, equipped with combination locks, 



57 

have been installed in the boys' dressing room in the town 
hall ; resurfacing machine for use in renovating desk and 
table tops. Each of the additions meets a definite need 
and adds greatly to the physical equipment of the school. 

I wish to thank the faculty for their helpful attitude, 
ever-generous assistance, and good will in all activities 
connected with the school. 

Finally, may I express my appreciation of the loyal 
support and cooperation of the Superintendent, members 
of the School Committee, the Board of Trustees of Smith 
Academy, and the Board of Selectmen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD J. BURKE, 

Principal. 



58 



School Health Report 

HATFIELD, 1935 



To the Superintendent and 
Members of the School Committee, 
Hatfield, Massachusetts. 

Nearly a hundred years ago Horace Mann said "the 
Nature of Education must be explained, we cannot drive 
our people up a dark avenue even though it be the right 
one." This is especially true of any branch in health 
education, innate reserve and tradition hamper the older 
generaton and the complexities of modern livirg brings 
in many factors to confuse the young and the knowledge 
of how to deal with these complexities is in itself confus- 
ing. The problem is to classify and sift out what is worth 
while. 

The newest approach in education places more and 
more responsibility on the child. Children are learning, 
under guidance how to work together in groups for indi- 
vidual as well as for group welfare how to evaluate the 
pros and cons of many things never heard of many years 
later than when Horace Mann made that statement. 

The screen and radio influence the child's opinion 
sometimes wisely, sometimes not, anyone associating with 
children know this to be true. What to do about it is no 
minor responsibility but it seems practical to keep abreast 
or a leap ahead and help the child to make his or her own 
decision even to the extent of evaluating Pop-Eye and his 
Spinach. 

Much is being written and promoted through educa- 
tional and commercial channels relating to health and the 



59 

teaching of health may or may not be educational depend- 
ing- on whether or not the presentation conveys practical 
knowledge, wholesome interests and establishes worth 
while habits. The interest and preparation of the teacher 
enters into the presentation. The value of good physical 
and mental health must be explained and presented in a 
manner acceptable to the child's understanding. Spec- 
tacular demonstration is dramatic and has its place but 
the every day teaching and practice of cleanliness, safety, 
rest, etc., cannot help but have an effect. The new text 
books selected for the grammar grades carry out besides 
knowledge, practical ideas and colorful illustration of com- 
mon things relating to healthful living, the large type 
helping to conserve vision, the text phased in language 
pleasing and plain. 

The regular health program differs but slightly from 
the program of the previous year as the results of this 
program seem to be working well as shown by the added 
responsibility of the pupils in regard to their own health 
and safety. 

The program though interrelated may be divided in- 
to— 

1st — The actual classroom teaching by the teacher from 
graded text books on healthful living and by class 
inspection. 

2nd — The teaching of First Aid and Safety to groups in 
the 7th, 8th and 9th grades. This First Aid teach- 
ing qualifies the apt pupil for a Junior Red Cross 
certificate in First Aid and Scout Merit Badge in 
First Aid. During the year — 

32 boys and 21 girls had instruction in First Aid. 

65 received certificates. 
7 pupils from High School had instruction in Lif e- 

Saving. 
3 received Lan emLblem and badge. 



60 

3rd — The physical examination grades 1 to 12 inclusive. 
The examination of the High school students is de- 
tailed and thorough before the students are per- 
mitted to enter athletic contests. The report on the 
Primary grade pupils is encouraging, with few ex- 
ceptions the children entering school present an ex- 
cellent appearance. The credit for this health pic- 
ture belongs to the young parents who appreciate 
the advice and cooperate with their family physician. 

4th — The use of the audiometer for the hearing test in- 
cludes grades 1 to 12. Faulty hearing is sometimes 
difficult to detect, the child being classed as indiffer- 
ent or dull. Faulty hearing may be improved by 
the removal of diseased tonsils and obstructive ad- 
enoids and although the defect may not be complete- 
ly corrected by treatment, much help may be given 
the pupil by explaining the handicap and arranging 
for better position in the class room in regard to 
sound and through better concentration on the part 
of the pupil and above all removing from the mind 
the sense of inferiorty common to all persons hard 
of hearing. 

16 children had diseased or obstructive tonsils re- 
moved. 

5th — Vision test by the class room teacher and check up. 
It is not difficult to detect faulty vision and no one 
is in better position to observe the expression on the 
face of the child and manner of doing class work 
when not conscious of being watched than the class 
room teacher. The check up usually confirms her 
observation. 

9 children were fitted to corrective lens. 
7 children had lenses changed. 



61 

6th — The oral examination by the dentist and the follow- 
up dental clinic. Open to all students. 

235 children had dental work during the year, 
either by the clinic dentist or private dentist. 

7th — The physical education program needs no explana- 
tion, athletics, gymnastics, dancing, under the direc- 
tion of class room teachers in addition to their reg- 
ular work is a commendable service to the communi- 
ty as well as an excellent health measure. 



8th — The State Clinic operating 


under 


Dr. 


O'Brien ex 


amined — 








Von-Pirquet 






92 


Re-acting 






49 


X-rayed 






45 


Examined 






13 


Referred for follow-up 






4 



The Chadwick Clinic X-rayed and examined 12 chil- 
dren. - 

3 children discharged from the clinic. 
9 noted much improved. 

The State Clinic, under Dr. O'Brien will gradually 
take over the work begun by the Chadwick clinic and ex- 
amine each year, pupils in the 7th, 9th and 11th grades. 
The objective of this clinic is to detect symptoms of tuber- 
culosis and follow up any child showing a tendency to the 
disease. Tuberculosis is by no means conquered, it may 
be controlled and cured through intelligent cooperation if 
taken in time but not otherwise. It has been clearly dem- 
onstrated a chance check up is not dependable and all 
parents and teachers are earnestly requested to give as- 
sistance to this yearly clinic on behalf of the children. 

The Diphtheria Immunization clinic operating 
through the Local Board of Health treated — 
63 children, 44 under 6 years of age. 



62 

The new project of school lunch was a success and 
the school health department sincerely appreciates the 
help given through the local branch of the ERA. It was 
clearly demonstrated the lunch could be operated as a 
regular feature of the health program, providing a civic 
interest be directed toward that objective. The school 
lunch cannot be self supporting and achieve its purpose 
as the rising cost of food material would put even the small 
cost beyond the reach of some that need it, especially when 
several children from the same family attend school. 

The school health department extends appreciation 
to The State Dept. of Health, Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Co., Prudential Insurance Co., American Red Cross and the 
Hampshire County Public Health Association for helpful 
material on health education and the use of facilities under 
their control. 

Every one should keep in mind the value of the Hamp- 
shire County Public Health Association in giving an op- 
portunity for children to attend the Health Camp Hodg- 
kins for four weeks during the summer and that the sale 
of Christmas seals makes this opportunity possible. 

2 girls were admitted to the health camp during the 
summer and were benefited by the rest and care. The 
health of the school child is important and the price is 
eternal vigilance and cooperative interest. 

To al lmembers of the school department, teachers, 
pupils and parents this report of the health work in the 
schools is respectfully submitted. 

MARIAN HOLMES, R. N. 



63 



Report of Music Supervisor 



To the Members of the School Committee and 
Superintendent of Schools : 

Vocal music in our schools ought to sound like music 
at all times and it can if the children use their singing 
voices correctly. We emphasize singing above everything 
else. We do much individual singing in the lower grades 
to aid deficient pitch, and sing in concert to help some 
voices to keep in time with other voices which also trains 
the child to use his ears keenly. 

Aside from the cultivation of a pleasing singing tone 
our aim in music in the public schools may be summed up 
as follows : 

Music reading is simply a means which permits a wide 
experience in song singing which in turn is an incentive to 
musical growth which results in Music Appreciaton, the 
open door to greater opportunities in the field of music. 

We strive to build up a working knowledge of the 
fundamentals and application of the same through the 
grades so that all students are prepared in Smith Academy 
to continue the advanced work of the chorus and glee club. 

We know that the radio recently installed in the Acad- 
emy is and will continue to be of great value in our music 
course. We are enabled to have the advantages of the 
Damrosch Music Appreciation programs and there is a 
large enrollment in this class. 

I wish to express my very deep appreciation to the 
members of the School Committee, Mr. Hebard, principals 
and teachers, and pupils for their sincere cooperation and 
loyal support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



64 



TEACHER NOTES 



School 
Smith Academy 



Center School 



School Street 

Hill 

No. Hatfield 

Brads tree t 

Health Education 
and Nurse 
Music 
Penmanship 



Present 

Teacher Residence Salary 

E. J. Burke, Holyoke $2,400.00 

John H. Kalloch, Hatfield 1,520.00 

Clarence J. Larkin, Haydenville 1,440.00 

Mary E. Ryan, Hatfield 1,280.00 

Frances V. Annis, Lynn, 1,050.00 

Elizabeth F. Baker, Lynn 960.00 

Dorothy Allaire, Hatfield 900.00 

Margaret Stoddard, Hatfield 800.00 

Harold L. Ford, Northampton 1,152.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, Hatfield 960.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, Hatfield 960.00 

Grace W. Bardwell, Hatfield 960.00 

Mary F. Ahearn, Northampton 960.00 

Catherine T. Shea, Holyoke 960.00 

Katherine Hayes, Hatfield 960.00 

Vera M. Lynch, Holyoke 960.00 

Peter G. Staszko, Hatfield 800.00 

Anna Osley, Hatfield 960.00 

Marie A. Proulx, Hatfield 960.00 

Constance Mullany, Hatfield 960.00 

Eleanor Whalen, Hatfield 960.00 

Mary D. Donelson, Hatfield 960.00 

Susan Petcen, Hatfield 900.00 

Lena Fitzgerald, Hatfield 960.00 

Helen F. Boyle, Hatfield 800.00 

Marian Holmes, R. N., Northampton 800.00 

Maude E. Boyle, Hatfield 750.00 

Margaret Stoddard, Hatfield One-half time 

and salary as given above 



65 




HENRY F. LONG 
COMMISSIONER 



THEODORE N. WADDELL 
DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTS 



Department of (EnrporattottB an& Saxattfltt 
Htmaimt of Amntnts 

Bute Sputa?, Snstott 

January 22, 1936 



To the Board of Selectmen 

Mr. John W. Mullin,s Chairman 
Hatfield, Massachusetts 



Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books 
and accounts of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
December 31, 1935, made in accordance with the provis- 
ions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of 
a report made to me by Mr. Herman B. Dine, Assistant 
Director of Accounts. 



Very truly yours, 

Theodore N. Waddell, 

Director of Accounts. 



66 

Mr. Theodore N. Waddell 
Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 
State House, Boston 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions I have made an 
audit of the books and accounts of the town of Hatfield 
for the year ending December 31, 1935, and submit the 
following report thereon : 

The financial transactions as recorded on the books 
of the several departments collecting money for the town 
or committing bills for collection were examined, checked, 
and verified. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were 
examined and checked in detail. The recorded receipts 
were checked with the records of the departments collect- 
ing money for the town and with the treasurer's cash 
book, while the payments as recorded were compared with 
the treasury warrants and the treasurer's records. The 
appropriations voted by the town were listed from the 
town clerk's record of town meetings, being checked with 
the ledger appropriation accounts. The ledger accounts 
were analyzed, the necessary adjustments were made, a 
trial balance was taken off, and a balance sheet, which is 
appended to this report, was prepared showing the finan- 
cial condition of the town on December 31, 1935. 

The books and accounts of the town treasurer were 
examined and checked. The recorded receipts were 
checked with the records of the departments collecting 
money for the town or committing bills for collection and 
with the other sources from which money was paid into 
the town treasury, while the payments were compared 
with the selectmen's warrants authorizing them. The 
cash book additions were verified and the cash balance on 



67 

December 31, 1935, was proved by a reconciliation of the 
bank account with a statement received from the bank 
and by actual count of the cash in the office. 

The payments on account of debt and interest were 
checked with the amounts falling due and with the can- 
celled securities on file. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were ex- 
amined and checked in detail. /The taxes outstanding at 
the time of the previous examination were audited and 
proved, and the subsequent commitment lists of poll, prop- 
erty, and motor vehicle excise taxes were added and re- 
conciled with the warrants given by the assessors for their 
collection. The recorded collections were checked with 
the commitment lists, the payments to the treasurer were 
compared with the treasurer's record of receipts, the 
abatements were checked with the assessors' records of 
abatements granted, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved with the accountant's ledger. 

Verification of the outstanding accounts was made by 
mailing notices to a number of persons whose names ap- 
peared on the books as owing money to the town, the re- 
plies received thereto indicating that the accounts as listed 
are correct. 

The collector's cash on hand was verified by actual 
count. 

Since the previous audit, proof has been presented by 
a number of persons to the effect that their taxes, aggre- 
gating $227.33, had been paid to the former collector but 
had not been credited on the books of the town. The 
present collector, to whom the taxes in question were re- 
committed for collection, was credited with the amount of 
$227.33 and the cash shortage of the former collector was 
increased correspondingly, so that on December 31, 1935, 
it amounted to $3,080.01. During the process of the audit 



68 

the amount of this discrepancy was paid to the town by 
the bonding company. 

The financial transactions of the town clerk were ex- 
amined. The receipts for dog and sporting licenses were 
checked with the record of licenses issued. The payments 
to the State and to the town treasurer were verified and 
the cash on hand was counted. 

The surety bonds of the town clerk, treasurer, tax 
collector, and water collector were examined and found to 
be in proper form. 

The receipts for licenses granted by the board of se- 
lectmen were checked with the record of licenses granted 
and the payments to the treasurer wre verified. 

The receipts from town hall rents were checked with 
the records of rentals, and the payments to the treasurer 
were compared with the treasurer's cash book. 

The accounts of the sealer of weights and measures 
were examined. The recorded receipts were checked with 
the record of work done, and the payments to the treas- 
urer were proved by a comparison with the treasurer's 
records. 

The records of accounts receivable of the health, high- 
way, and public welfare departments were examined. The 
charges were listed and compared with the reported com- 
mitments, the recorded collections and disallowances were 
checked, and the outstanding accounts were listed and 
proved with the accountant's ledger. 

The recorded receipts of the librarian for fines, etc., 
were checked, the payments to the treasurer being veri- 
fied, and the cash on hand being proved by actual count. 

The books and accounts of the water department were 
examined and checked. The charges were added, the re- 
corded collections were checked with the commitment lists, 



69 

the payments to the treasurer were verified, the abate- 
ments were checked, and the outstanding accounts were 
listed and proved with the accountant's ledger. The water 
collector's cash on hand was proved by actual count. 

The securities, including the savings bank books, rep- 
resenting the investment of the trust funds in the custody 
of the treasurer were examined and listed, the income 
being proved and the withdrawals being compared with 
the treasurer's records. 

There are appended to this report, in addition to the 
balance sheet, tables showing a reconciliation of the treas- 
urer's cash, summaries of the tax and departmental ac- 
counts, together with tables showing the transactions and 
condition of the trust funds. 

For the cooperation extended by all the town officials 
during the course of the audit, I wish, on behalf of my as- 
sistants and for myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Herman B. Dine, 

Assistant Director of Accounts. 



70 

RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Balance January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $20,641.04 

Receipts 1935, 123,502.85 

$144,143.89 
Payments 1935, $119,849.39 

Balance December 31, 1935: 
First National Bank of 

Northampton, $24,166.27 

Cash in office, verified, 128.23 

$144,143.89 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF NORTHAMPTON 

Balance December 31, 1935, per 

statement, $25,529.86 

Balance December 31, 1935, 

per check book, $24,166.27 

Outstanding checks December 31, 

per list, 1,363.59 

$25,529.86 



TAXES— 1930 

Outstanding- January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $38.17 

Payments to treasurer, $23.64 

Abatements, 9.13 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 5.40 

1.17 



71 

TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $321.70 

Payments to treasurer, $161.75 

Abatements, 12.77 

Audit adjustment: 

Collections not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 117.49 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 



list, 


29.69 


$321.70 


TAXES— 1932 




Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 






previous audit, 




$606.81 


Payments to treasurer, 


$368.42 




Abatements, 


139.40 




Collections not credited, trans- 






ferred to discrepancy account 






of former collector, 


8.66 




Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 






list, 


88.33 




Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 






verified, 


2.00 




■ 




$606.81 


TAXES— 1933 




Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 






previous audit, 




$11,309.76 


Payments to treasurer, 


$9,566.69 




Abatements, 


20.35 





72 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 1,667.26 

Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 

verified, 55.46 

$11,309.76 



TAXES— 1934 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $27,197.46 

Overpayment to collector, adjusted, .01 

$27,197.47 
Payments to treasurer, $18,439.73 

Abatements, 19.45 

Transfer to tax titles, 179.42 
Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 8,556.87 
Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 

verified, 2.00 

$27,197.47 



TAXES— 1935 

Commitment per warrant, $69,756.02 

Additional commitment, 2.65 

Overpayment to treasurer, adjusted, .02 

$69,758.69 

Payments to treasurer. $44,863.17 

Abatements, 385.43 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

per list, 24,510.09 

$69,758.69 



73 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding January 1; 1935, per 

previous audit, $57.00 

Payments to treasurer, $36.00 

Abatements, 6.00 

Audit adjustment : 

Collections not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 6.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, . 9.00 

$57.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES^-1932 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $105.00 



Payments to treasurer, 


$64.00 


Abatements, 


11.00 


Audit adjustment : 




Collections not credited, trans- 




ferred to discrepancy account 




of former collector, 


4.00 


Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 




list, 


25.00 


Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 




verified, 


1.00 



$105.00 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE TAXES— 1933 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $64.00 



74 

Payments to treasurer, $20.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 43.00 

Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 

verified, 1.00 

$64.00 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1930 
Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 



previous audit, 


$62.12 




Error in abatements reported, 






adjusted, 


.33 


$62.45 


Payments to treasurer, 


$6.54 




Abatements, 


53.00 




Audit adjustment : 






Collections not credited, trans- 






ferred to discrepancy account 






of former collector, 


2.91 


$62.45 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1931 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $201.69 



Payments to treasurer, 


$69.13 




Abatements, 


58.91 




Audit adjustment: 






Collections not credited, trans- 






ferred to discrepancy account 






of former collector, 


34,06 




Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 






list, 


39.59 


$201.69 



75 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1932 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $476.49 

Payments to treasurer, $249.37 

Abatements, 58.56 

Audit adjustment: 

Collections not credited, trans- 
ferred to discrepancy account 
of former collector, 54.21 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 110.35 

Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 

verified, 4.00 

$476.49 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1933 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $170.56 

Payments to treasurer, $66.59 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 103.97 

$170.56 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1934 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $919.04 

Refund of motor vehicle excise taxes 

1934, entered as 1935, 1.85 

$920.89 

Payments to treasurer, $597.90 

Abatements, 9.32 



76 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 313.67 

$920.89 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES— 1935 



Commitment per warrants, $4,187.62 

Abatements after payment, refunded, 144.91 



$4,332.53 



Payments to treasurer, $3,177.50 




Abatements, 374.32 




Error in warrants, adjusted, 10.00 




Refunde of motor vehicle excise taxes 




1934, entered as 1935, 1.85 




Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 




list, 768.86 






$4,332.53 



INTEREST ON TAXES 


Collections 1935: 




Taxes : 




Levy of 1930, 


$6.29 


Levy of 1931, 


25.25 


Levy of 1932, 


35.57 


Levy of 1933, 


877.99 


Levy of 1934, 


577.51 


Levy of 1935, 


10.72 



$1,533.33 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
Levy of 1930, $1.52 

Levy of 1931, 10.97 

Levy of 1932, 32.18 

Levy of 1933, 7.53 



77 



Levy of 1934, 


29.18 




Levy of 1935, 


9.05 


90.43 

$1,623.76 


Payments to treasurer, 




$1,616.73 


Cash on hand December 31, 


1935, 




verified, 




7.03 



TOWN CLERK 

Dog Licenses 

Cash on hand December 31, 1934, 

per previous audit, $7.20 

Licenses issued 1935: 

Males, 108 at $2.00, $216.00 

Spayed females, 19 at 2.00, 38.00 
Females, 12 at 5.00, 60.00 

$314.00 

Payments to treasurer 1935, $293.40 

Fees retained 1935, 139 at 20 cents, 27.80 



Sporting Licenses 

Cash on hand January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $11.25 

Licenses issued 1935 : 
Resident citizens' 

fishing, 58 at $2.00, $116.00 

Resident citizens' 

hunting, 92 at 2.00, 184.00 



$1,623.76 



$321.20 



;321.20 



78 



Resident citizens' 

sporting, 44 at 3.25, 143.00 

Resident citizens' 

minors' and females' 



fishing, 


23 at 1.25, 


28.75 




Resident citizens' 






trapping, 


10 at 5.25, 


52.50 




Resident citizens' 






minors' trap- 








ping, 


10 at 2.25, 


22.50 




Non-resident 








citizens' 








fishing, 


lat 5.25, 


5.25 




Non-resident 








citizens' 




• 




hunting, 


lat 10.25, 


10.25 




Special non- 








resident's 








fishing, 


lat 1.50, 


1.50 




Duplicate, 


1 at .50, 


.50 

$564.25 










$575.50 


Payments to Division of Fisheries 




and Game, 




$500.50 




Fees retained, 240 at $.25, 


60.00 




Cash on hand December 31, 193£ 


>, 




verified, 




10.00 


$575.50 




COURT FINES 




Receipts 1935, 






$644.00 


Payments to treasurer 1935, 




$644.00 



79 

SELECTMEN'S LICENSES 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $25.50 



Licenses issued 1935 : 








Oil dealers', 


$2.00 






Common victuallers', 


5.00 






Gas station, 


9.00 






Junk, 


23.00 






Peddlers', 


8.00 






Slaughter, 


3.00 






Beauty parlor, 


1.00 






Milk, 


.50 






Oleomargarine, 


1.00 






Denatured alcohol, 


1.00 






Liquor, 


1,755.00 


$1,808.50 


$1,834.00 


Payments to treasurer 


1935, 


$1,833.50 




Abatements 1935, 




.50 










$1,834.00 



TOWN HALL RENTALS 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $103.00 

Charges, 151.00 



Payments to treasurer, $68.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 186.00 



$254.00 



$254.00 



80 
SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Cash on hand January 1, 
previous audit, 


1935, per 


$7.43 




Charges 1935 : 
Sealing, 
Adjusting, 






$80.30 

2.70 


$90.43 


Payments to treasurer, 
Fees for adjusting, retained, 


1935, 


$87.73 
2.70 


$90.43 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $31.14 

Audit adjustment: 

Health charges entered as public 

welfare, 123.57 

$154.71 
Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, $154.71 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 
Accounts Receivable 



Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 




previous audit, 


$5.43 


Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 




list, 


$5.43 



81 

PUBLIC WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Accounts Receivable 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, per 

previous audit, $358.70 

Charges, 1,215.00 

Audit adjustments: 

Charges not entered, 40.00 

Collections of old age assistance 

entered as public welfare, 481.89 

Payments to treasurer, $1,262.98 

Audit adjustments: 

Disallowances not entered, 73.30 

Health charges entered as 

public welfare, 123.57 

Old age assistance charges 

entered as public welfare, 472.57 

Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 163.17 



$2,095.59 



$2,095.59 



BUREAU OF OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Accounts Receivable 

Audit adjustments: 

Old age assistance charges entered 

as public welfare, $472.57 

Charges not entered, 126.66 

$599.23 

Audit adjustment: 

Collections of old age assistance 

entered as public welfare, $481.89 



82 



Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 117.34 



WATER RATES 

Outstanding January 1, 1935, $1,878.31 

Commitments, 6,100.72 

Additional charges, 61.30 
Overpayment to treasurer, to be 

adjusted by collector, 1.50 

Payments to treasurer, $5,445.56 

Abatements, 231.28 
Outstanding December 31, 1935, per 

list, 2,309.01 
Cash on hand December 31, 1935, 

verified, 51.78 

Cash variation December 31, 1935, 4.20 



$599.23 



LIBRARY 






Cash on hand January 1, 1935, 






per previous audit, 


$ .41 




Receipts 1935, 


33.25 


$33.66 


Payments to treasurer, 1935, 




$33.66 



1,041.83 



1,041.83 



83 
HATFIELD LIBRARY FUND 



Savings Securities 




Deposits Par Value 


Total 


On hand at beginning 




of year 1935, $241.84 $1,400.00 


$1,641.84 


On hand at end of year 




1935, $162.46 $1,400.00 


$1,562.46 


Receipts Payments 




Withdrawn from Added to savings 




savings deposits, $158.11 deposits, 


$78.73 


Income, 78.73 Transfer to town, 


158.11 


$236.84 


$236.84 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Savings Deposits 

In Custody In Custody 

of State of Town Securities 
Treasurer Treasurer Par Value Total 
On hand at be- 
ginning of 

year 1935, $300.00 $7,464.48 $500.00 $8,264.48 
On hand at end 

of year 1935, $300.00 $7,052.63 $500.00 $7,852.63 

Receipts Payments 

Withdrawn from Transfer to town, $660.81 

savings bank, $411.85 
Income, 248.96 



1660.81 $660.81 



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33 ° 12